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10

I would say that this won't have any effect. Flipping the chainring on a single speed makes sense as you use the other side of the teeth on the chainring which have not been used before. But with the chain it's a different story: The stretch is independent of directions so reversing its direction won't change anything. Also on the small "rolls" in the chain ...


8

This can be a fairly common occurrence with a fixed wheel bike. It may depend on a few different things, ie what sort of nuts you are using, how tight they are, what style of dropouts, and what the dropouts are made of. A different sort of nuts may help. eg something with serrated nuts or washers could grip better. Also you may be able to tighten the nuts ...


6

Where possible, replace with stainless fasteners. Things like water bottle bracket bolts are readily available in stainless at a good hardware store. But most fasteners on a good quality bike are stainless to begin with, so it may be that you're not seeing "rust" per se but rather a sort of corrosion that can form on stainless.


6

After cleaning I give the bolts a small squirt of WD40 followed by a good rub down. This leaves a very fine film of oil that won't hold dirt but is just enough to stave off the rust if done regularly. The spray also displaces (WD, water displacement, geddit?) any water left from cleaning in any little gaps.


5

Since the actual tire has burst, I think the most likely cause is that over the course of the 4000km you have ridden, the tire has suffered a cut or other damage that you did not previously notice. While sitting in your room, the pressure of the tube has gradually stretched the damaged area, and then burst. Inspect the other tire to check for cuts or ...


5

No, pedaling while standing will not cause a properly installed pedal to come off. However, if a pedal comes off, it not particularly desirable to be standing. As far as weight distribution, putting all your weight on one pedal for extended periods will not hurt you bike or cause things to go wrong with the bike.


4

I have no way of knowing if this will work with Slime but I have done something similar in industrial applications. You will need a "T" fitting and two shutoff valves. Install the valves on to the "T",one on the bottom port of the "T" and the other to a side port. Install the side port valve on the Slime hose as close to the pump as possible. Connect the ...


4

I love ATF (Automatic Transmission Fluid) for freewheel (not free hub) lube. What I do is lift the bike-- if someone can help you with this, it's a bit easier-- so that you can rotate the pedals (and make the back wheel spin). Ideally, the bike should be tilted to the non-drive side about 45-60 degrees. With the back wheel rotating, you can see where to ...


4

No, it wouldn't work as long as the frame is not hermetically sealed to keep water from entering (I don't know why manufacturers don't do that). The silica gel can only absorb a tiny quantity of water, a drop or so per packet, then it becomes ineffective. It is only effective to absorb water vapor. You can bake it in the oven to regenerate it. If you want ...


3

Metallic marker would probably work with periodic reapplication. I'd also suspect spray paint would work as well (even on the outside). For car tires, they sell tire paint pens (such as these) which I think would work on a bicycle as well. Alternatively, you could just hang tags (like repair tags) on the tires and attach/detach them when you want to use ...


3

How many days do you have for the tour? Just about anyone (including my polio self) can do 60 miles (100 km) in a day, so long as there aren't too many hills and there isn't a bad headwind. Rain will slow you down (and can make the ride miserable) but won't stop you unless it's very heavy or the weather is especially cold. (Hail, on the other hand, can ...


3

I generally wipe whatever greasy or oily rag I have lying around at the shop on any uncoated steer tubes as a habit. We're in a fairly dry area so it's not of great importance. If I was in a wet area I'd use a product called FrameSaver. There is no concern with slippage if the steer tube is greasy.


3

Little bits of rust shouldn't hurt anything, but if you're getting lots of rust or it just drives you crazy you might consider spraying them down with a wax based lubricant or dry lube. Finish Line's Teflon dry lube might be a good option because it has a tendency to build up on chains, which means it goes on thick and may act as a barrier to oxidation. ...


2

You may have to do some searching to find the right sizes but you could go with stainless steel hardware. Buying them in small quantities can be expensive. I have had issues with some hardware that is countersunk. Conventional allenheads won't fit in the hole. Maybe that is why they call the brand "Specialized".


2

What the other Dan said, plus if you drop the stuff into your seat tube it will end up in the bottom bracket housing and muck up your BB bearings. It is quite unusual for frames to rust through anyway (I've only seen it on frames that have been left in the weather for years, if not decades), and if you're that concerned you can remove the BB and headset ...


2

Carbon is incredibly strong in the direction for which is has been designed to withstand stress and pressure, but can be susceptible to damage that might seem innocuous if received on say an Alloy bike. Your frame for example is incredibly rigid and strong for impact travelling vertically up through your wheels, into your forks and stays, and through the ...


2

Whilst carbon fibre is fantastic for bike frames; it is light and strong and can be formed into interesting shapes - one of the problems is that if the surface is damaged then it can affect the structural rigidity of the component, e.g. frame. Wear and Tear So, it is vitally important to protect the frame as much as you can - especially if you live in a wet ...


2

Always - Always! Follow the instructions regarding torque - otherwise you could snap your frame/post etc.. As for everything else, I think it's the same, I treat my carbon roadie as I would my aluminium. Clean it etc, but with carbon, if you have a crash or such, it would be an idea to check for cracks, and get them looked at!


2

What I'd do: remove the pedal thoroughly clean the pedal threads thoroughly clean the crank threads let both dry apply 2 drops of thread locker on the pedal threads (e.g loctite blue) fasten pedal on the crank well (e.g 40 Nm) If it comes loose after that I'd temporarily try another left pedal just to find out whether the pedal or the crank arm is ...


2

Pay attention when buying brake pads. For me, salmon Kool Stops have worked for winter commuting. The things to look for are some kind of plow-like design that directs mud away instead of packing it between pad and rim and rubber compound that does not embed debris easily. The latter is hard to find by just looking :)


2

Option 1: Mid-race bike change Many cyclocross riders switch bikes mid-race due to build-up of mud and debris and the dirt emulsion which accumulates on braking surfaces. Ideally you would have an assistant to supervise your belongings in the pit/service area and rinse the bike you've returned to prepare it for another bike change later in the race. Option ...


2

On the bike you have, just keep the chain oiled and the brakes tight. There is no point in bothering to service anything else, as regardless of what you do it will just drop off one fine day. In any case, single speed commuters don't need much maintenance. The bike has really poor build quality. Go to your bike shop to get stuff fixed when you have real ...


2

You use a reusable zip tie instead of marking the tire itself. Write the details on that, and put it on the bike frame or brake cable etc when the tire is on the bike and around the tire when its in storage. I would suggest a simple numbering or letter system and a notebook for details would mean fewer letters and less chance of them being unreadable, ...


2

I think the maintenance periods for MTB are the hardest to predict, because conditions vary greatly. If you ride in wet, muddy conditions you'll have to replace your drivetrain and brake components far more frequently than if you ride mostly in dry conditions. You seem to be mostly concerned about bearing systems so I'm guessing you're riding in the slop a ...


2

Bearings and races are made of very hard steel. So long as they are properly maintained (lubricated and adjusted to the correct tightness; visit Free Ride in Pittsburgh for help lubing/adjusting your bike if it's feeling worn and you don't want to pay a shop to do it for you), they should hold up with no problem. More info: ...


1

I'll second that this was probably just not your lucky day and you probably couldn't have done anything reasonable to prevent it (assuming the wheel, tube itself is in good condition and the tire was properly inflated to begin with). In the case of the ferry that PeteH mentions, the ambient temperature may have been much higher than the outside ...


1

You should definitely check the gear shifting regularly. I'd say monthly, or whenever you notice that it's not as easy or definite as you'd like. That means popping the outers off the frame, sliding them along the cables and making sure there's no grit or fraying. Then lube them. Doing that will kill the fine adjustment of the gears, so you need to get the ...


1

I suggest that you recheck the torque at regular intervals. If the torque is less than it should be then the nut is working loose somehow. This could be due to vibration, dropout material expanding/contracting with heat/cold, meddlesome kids, etc. One solution might be to use a threadlocker - a weak glue to stop parts from vibrating loose. The recommended ...


1

Another potential cause of your problem might be your axle being wider than your frame. I had that with an old steel framed road bike and a new wheel and it was subtle enough that I didn't notice, but my LBS pointed it out when I complained of a similar phenomenon. If that's the case you may be able to cut the axle down to fit. I actually avoided that ...


1

In my experience it is normal to cover about 150-200 km in a day (provided you are well trained and equipped). The speed you can maintain is dependent on many factors like your training, type of bike (hybrid/mtbs are slower than road/touring with drop bars) and also the nature of terrain, weather, etc. Spare tubes, tire levers, pump, patch kit, tools like ...



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