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11

The way you asked the question, it sounds like you think the following is happening: first, the derailleur hanger wears out/weakens, then it snaps, and this causes the derailleur to go into the spokes. It is much more likely that the chain of events is the following: the derailleur is mis-adjusted, when you shift to the largest cog on the rear, the ...


10

I would say that this won't have any effect. Flipping the chainring on a single speed makes sense as you use the other side of the teeth on the chainring which have not been used before. But with the chain it's a different story: The stretch is independent of directions so reversing its direction won't change anything. Also on the small "rolls" in the chain ...


9

One proven way to retain the "new" feeling of a bike is to keep adding new parts to it. It's a well known (I would say proven but can't find the article) fact that people experience a noticeable performance boost when riding a new bike or upgrading gear. This expectation of better performance actually does lead to a small performance increase. The same ...


9

Aesthetically, it's just a case of keeping it clean. Use a toothbrush to clear accumulated dirt out of the little nooks and crannies, like the joints between tubes (especially around the bottom bracket). Waxing the frame can help keep that brand-new lustre. The back of the chainring and spider, sprockets, rear hub, and dropouts, can get grotty pretty ...


8

This can be a fairly common occurrence with a fixed wheel bike. It may depend on a few different things, ie what sort of nuts you are using, how tight they are, what style of dropouts, and what the dropouts are made of. A different sort of nuts may help. eg something with serrated nuts or washers could grip better. Also you may be able to tighten the nuts ...


7

You can cut an aluminum soda can into a small strip and wrap that around and fold it like a tiny burrito into the end. Crimp with pliers. Picture lovingly misappropriated from http://billgrady.com/wp/2002/11/14/how-to-wrap-a-burrito/


6

Where possible, replace with stainless fasteners. Things like water bottle bracket bolts are readily available in stainless at a good hardware store. But most fasteners on a good quality bike are stainless to begin with, so it may be that you're not seeing "rust" per se but rather a sort of corrosion that can form on stainless.


6

After cleaning I give the bolts a small squirt of WD40 followed by a good rub down. This leaves a very fine film of oil that won't hold dirt but is just enough to stave off the rust if done regularly. The spray also displaces (WD, water displacement, geddit?) any water left from cleaning in any little gaps.


5

No, pedaling while standing will not cause a properly installed pedal to come off. However, if a pedal comes off, it not particularly desirable to be standing. As far as weight distribution, putting all your weight on one pedal for extended periods will not hurt you bike or cause things to go wrong with the bike.


5

Usually when you take a bike out of the box, it's disassembled. I'm guessing that this isn't what you are referring to :P. If you want your bike just like when you got it from the bike shop, there's a few easy things you can do. Keep your tires inflated to the proper pressure. If you get a decent pump, it should be easy to keep the tires inflated. ...


5

Since the actual tire has burst, I think the most likely cause is that over the course of the 4000km you have ridden, the tire has suffered a cut or other damage that you did not previously notice. While sitting in your room, the pressure of the tube has gradually stretched the damaged area, and then burst. Inspect the other tire to check for cuts or ...


5

Use fenders with good coverage! They will keep most of the dirty spray water off your bike. You'll be surprised how much less oiling your chain needs with proper fenders. Proper fenders means: a front fender with a mud flap that reaches within a few centimeters of the road a rear fender that starts some centimeters below the chain stays, so that water ...


4

No, it wouldn't work as long as the frame is not hermetically sealed to keep water from entering (I don't know why manufacturers don't do that). The silica gel can only absorb a tiny quantity of water, a drop or so per packet, then it becomes ineffective. It is only effective to absorb water vapor. You can bake it in the oven to regenerate it. If you want ...


4

I usually use an old spoke nipple. Slide it over the end and crimp with an electrical (stake-on/solderless connector) crimper.


4

I love ATF (Automatic Transmission Fluid) for freewheel (not free hub) lube. What I do is lift the bike-- if someone can help you with this, it's a bit easier-- so that you can rotate the pedals (and make the back wheel spin). Ideally, the bike should be tilted to the non-drive side about 45-60 degrees. With the back wheel rotating, you can see where to ...


4

I have no way of knowing if this will work with Slime but I have done something similar in industrial applications. You will need a "T" fitting and two shutoff valves. Install the valves on to the "T",one on the bottom port of the "T" and the other to a side port. Install the side port valve on the Slime hose as close to the pump as possible. Connect the ...


3

I generally wipe whatever greasy or oily rag I have lying around at the shop on any uncoated steer tubes as a habit. We're in a fairly dry area so it's not of great importance. If I was in a wet area I'd use a product called FrameSaver. There is no concern with slippage if the steer tube is greasy.


3

How many days do you have for the tour? Just about anyone (including my polio self) can do 60 miles (100 km) in a day, so long as there aren't too many hills and there isn't a bad headwind. Rain will slow you down (and can make the ride miserable) but won't stop you unless it's very heavy or the weather is especially cold. (Hail, on the other hand, can ...


3

Little bits of rust shouldn't hurt anything, but if you're getting lots of rust or it just drives you crazy you might consider spraying them down with a wax based lubricant or dry lube. Finish Line's Teflon dry lube might be a good option because it has a tendency to build up on chains, which means it goes on thick and may act as a barrier to oxidation. ...


3

I have actually used these options: Epoxy glue: let it dry a little before applying. It is too liquid just after mixed, so let it dry and use it like if it were modeling putty. Thin cooper wire from a telephone cord. Wounded it around the end of the cable. It would look like a bass guitar string. Solder wire applied cold, wound a couple of turns and crimp ...


3

The problem that will affect your bike is not directly heat, but UV radiation from sunlight, and that does not only happens when the sun shines directly on the bike, scattered light from the sky and nearby objects will also have an effect. UV radiation degrades polymers, plastics, rubber, and similar, sort of toasting them, making them dull, less flexible. ...


3

Metallic marker would probably work with periodic reapplication. I'd also suspect spray paint would work as well (even on the outside). For car tires, they sell tire paint pens (such as these) which I think would work on a bicycle as well. Alternatively, you could just hang tags (like repair tags) on the tires and attach/detach them when you want to use ...


3

To check your headset, sit on the bike, lock the front brakes, and push forward/backward with your feet. If you can see any looseness in the headset it needs to be tightened. Since it's so easy to check one should check a few times a year. But no real "schedule" is needed. I've seen headsets that were remarkably loose. Though looseness affects handling to ...


3

A couple of tips I learned when winter commuting in Calgary: Depending on how much salt gets used on the roads where you live, using a good quality car wax on the frame will go a long way towards rust prevention. A squirt of WD-40 on your chain, cable pivot points, etc. will displace any water that's collected there. Keep your chain well lubed with a good ...


3

Store your bike in a dry place if possible. This is probably the most important thing - even if you ride every day, your bike spends more time parked than it does on the road. Clean and oil the chain regularly. If it's squeaking or showing rust, you're not doing it often enough. If you have loose bearings anywhere on your bike (hubs, pedals, bottom bracket, ...


3

The most common way is to use a "Chain Wear Indicator Gauge" tool. (google for product pages). If you don't have access to (or don't want to buy) one, you can use a ruler: http://sheldonbrown.com/brandt/chain-care.html


2

Wrap it tightly with electrical/gaffa tape?


2

What the other Dan said, plus if you drop the stuff into your seat tube it will end up in the bottom bracket housing and muck up your BB bearings. It is quite unusual for frames to rust through anyway (I've only seen it on frames that have been left in the weather for years, if not decades), and if you're that concerned you can remove the BB and headset ...


2

Good answers above. I would add:: new bar tape wash and service your bike weekly buy yourself new gloves or jersey occasionally - this one is about the bike/human relationship :-) These things keep the bike running at it's optimum. And yes, allow the bike to mature. It gains character. If you look after your bike, it's not the bike that changes but ...


2

The empty ink-tube of a ballpoint pen makes good cable ends. The metal ones may be squeezed into place. If you have a plastic one cut off 1 cm, put over the cable end and heat with a flame.



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