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23

Don't expect much until you know the guys that work at a bike shop. I bought my first road bike (a single speed) from my not-so-local LBS because it was on sale (45 miles from my house, with several bike shops in between). In the process, I discovered that I got along well with the guys that work there. In return for our growing relationship, they started ...


20

According to lifehacker end of January or February: http://lifehacker.com/5440376/the-best-times-to-buy-anything-all-year-round why? Bicycles and outdoor gear "If you want the newest stuff, the time to look is in February and March, when the season's models come out. The stores start replacing fall and winter stuff with spring and summer models, and ...


19

Probably not what you're looking for, but... if you live near a college campus and are willing to buy used, the end of May might be a good time to check Craigslist.


17

From someone who worked in retail for years: If you have to ask for a discount, you don't deserve one. Shops know what gear is worth and price it accordingly. Discounts are usually given to loyal customer (I'm talking years loyal) who the shop staff enjoy speaking to, dealing with and would like to keep them happy so they continue to shop there. ...


12

Things to consider are that when you buy a new bike it is a mix of different components, which are then packaged together and you receive a discount on the sum of the parts. This means that different manufacturers attempt to save money by using cheaper items for certain pieces of the overall puzzle. The major headline items are the frame, gear system, ...


12

Testing of helmets shows that there is little difference in impact protection. A better quality helmet, defined in this case as one that fits your head, is well ventilated, and looks good. A well ventilated helmet prevents you from overheating while riding, especially at high speeds. A helmet that fits stays put on your head during a crash. And one that is ...


11

They do. Connex (Wipperman) sells bulk chain, as shown by this link, and these people also buy it by the spool. This is likely what bike manufacturers do, and I've seen it in a bike shop or two. I'm sure you can also get it at some place like McMaster-Carr or Grainger if you ask for ANSI #40 roller chain with the appropriate width (possibly by special ...


10

There are many causes for price difference in bikes. There are others reasons than these listed below, but they tend to fall in line with one of these four categories. Brand Branding is always a premium. As in every industry I can think of, some brands have a reputation that to some extent justifies a premium price. This reputation is based off a multitude ...


9

I would be very careful with a deal that sounds too good to be true. Take a look at what happend to this carbon wheel in another question: Carbon Wheel Heat Bending I wouldn't buy from a company I've never heard of before and will never hear from again (like when the wheel deforms from the heat of braking and I'm trying to get a refund). Even the tagline ...


8

eBay is a good tool for determining value, search for your item selecting closed auctions and you often get a list of your item, bike in this case that has already sold (or not). The price of those transactions helps me determine relative value. Likewise craigslist shows you another view of what people are asking. If your target bike is being listed for ...


8

There are several issues that contribute to continuous rolls being less popular that pre packaged chains. Selection Economics: Even if a shop purchased 3 boxes of continuous chain (8, 9 and 10 speed), they still are only carrying one type of chain. Looking at how many component levels are available from any manufacturer, you can see how that would be a ...


7

The most critical thing is that it fits you well. You don't need to spend a lot of money -- in fact, I'd recommend against it for your first road bike. But a basic bike that fits you well will feel fun and will get used. And as you gain more experience with it, you'll know what to change/upgrade if you feel the need to buy a more expensive bike down the ...


7

Difficult to say without knowing more about the bike, but I'd trade it in for a better bike; Huffy has a rep for low-end, tank-like bikes. From your description, you'd need to replace the frame and front fork to see any significant weight savings. Something with an aluminum frame like a hybrid bike would probably be easier to carry up the stairs, even ...


6

Typically the cutoff point (I think) for a quality bike is in the $1000 - $1200 range. You're often looking at the same frame as on the $2000 model but with lower grade components. It's always seemed easier on my bank account to slowly upgrade components. Since I'm talking retail you may be able to find something in the $500 range on a site like Craigslist. ...


6

If you're buying from your LBS then I would think twice, yes they're making a profit on that shiny bike, but is a few quid/dollars/euros/pesos off the sticker worth endangering them? I frequent my LBS because the guys in there know me, they've sold me the last half dozen bikes I've bought, so when I come in, we chat, they fit my service and work in even ...


6

If the model numbers are the same, they will be the same parts built to the same specs. Of course, there are production line variations. If there are slight variations in the model numbers, they may be the same or they may be slightly different (typically slightly cheaper) to prevent exact comparison to the regular part as Daniel R. Hicks said in a ...


6

If you know the model and exact year Bicycle Blue Book is a good place to start. This is a link to all the models for Peugeot: http://www.bicyclebluebook.com/BicycleDatabase.aspx?make=718


5

In many countries all helmets legally sold meet a certain minimum standard. So there is no "too cheap" option, as the cheapest helmet you can buy will be considered safe enough. In this case spending more gets you a lighter, better looking (subjectively) and more comfortable helmet. The USA also has a mandatory standard. For information about the standards ...


5

I've worked retail at an LBS and at various other outdoor stores. Even if you come in politely and ask for a discount the fact is that the other 2 guys that did it that day were rude and pushy about it so it's unlikely that we're in any good mood at this point. We're happy to give discounts to the people that are nice bring donuts by, just come and talk in ...


5

I would definetly negotiate for a lower price. In these hard times it should be expected. That does not mean you are a "weasel" or a "thief"...Are you kidding me? Pay top dollar if you choose (car dealers must love you). A company needs to earn my business. That said I do my research as others have mentioned above. Whilst shopping for a bike I would ...


5

At the beginning of the summer I just bought an old Norco bike. I have a had tons of fun on it. I watched Kijiji (similar to craigslist) every day for a month and eventually this bike came up. It had never been ridden (there was not even a scratch on it) and the price was only $75 Canadian. Comparing my Norco, to a friends $3000 Trek, here is what I ...


5

From my experience, your best bet is to just build a very good relationship with your LBS. Once they know you well enough, they're likely to just make you a good offer to begin with. Note: This isn't advocating building the relationship for the discounts, but they are a nice side effect.


5

Material: The material of which the chain is made of affects the price greatly. Titanium chains, while not common, are ridiculous in terms of price. Often, in terms of material, it is the 'finish' of the chain that can affect its (claimed) performance and thus its price. For example a DA 7700 chain is nickel plated, DA 7800 has a zinc alloy etc etc. These ...


5

Where I am in NY, all of the dealers tend to have big sales in Feb-March to make room for the new stock. I bought my bike @30% off, which is a pretty big savings.


5

I would be in favor of waiting until you move. There is the possible problem of needing service work under warranty and the nearest dealer being some distance away. You must also factor in the shipping cost along with the expense of disassembly and reassembly if you can't do it yourself. There is also no better way to start a good relationship with your ...


4

The factories that make these bikes are mostly in China and Taiwan, I've been told (by my boss when I worked in a bicycle shop). If you're going there, maybe you can find a nearby retail outlet.


4

A quick Google brought up This article. It shows a list of prices for bike sharing rates in 10 cities around the world. It shows prices for various lengths of time that you can rent/borrow the bike for. In most places, the first 30 minutes (sometimes 45 minutes) are free, if you pay for a small yearly membership.


4

I agree with the other answers with regard to LBS. Many of them are doing their best to provide bicycle services and aren't making a mint doing it. It isn't a filthy-rich business and it doesn't make sense for most of them to sell used bikes. If THAT's what you'r looking for... If you are looking at a bike from a garage sale, Ebay or Craigslist seller, ...


4

Brompton is certainly a well known name in the bike industry. As such, I have faith in their ability to produce a quality folder. The £129.99 bike uses a design which is sub-optimal for a folder, since a single failure point has the option for the bike to collapse into the folded or partly folded position. Which is not to say it will fail, only that it ...


4

That bike is much older than 10 years. Probably somewhere in the '80s The bike pictured below is quite similar to yours, and was built in 1985. [Source: Peugeot 1985 product folder] Note however that these frames are generally of good quality, and if not terribly rusty can be used for many more years (and of course are very cool and retro looking). ...



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