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24

I haven't tried them specifically with goatheads, but I've run through nails, staples, glass and just about anything else you could find in an urban environment on Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires. I have never had a flat over thousands of miles with their Marathon Supremes, either--and they're much lighter and better riding--but they're not as puncture-proof ...


22

Some years ago, Bicycling magazine did a shootout on available locks and the Kryptonite "New York Chain" came out on top. Unfortunately, it weighs more than many bikes and is not easy to carry either. Fine if you can leave it where you lock your bike. I'm with the police department at a major university, and we have a program through Kryptonite where we ...


21

I've had both. A really nice trailer and a child bike seat -- where the child sits between the rider and the handlebar (like the WeeRide Kangaroo Child Bike Seat). My daughter was ok with the trailer, but absolutely preferred the seat. I found with the seat in front of me, the weight didn't affect me almost at all, and if the bike was going to fall, I'd ...


20

Here I'll summarize everyone else's answers (because of all the Q+A scattered through in the comments), with some additional information that I got elsewhere from reading inspired by people's answers. Wheels+tires: 700 x (28 - 38, maybe ~30), tires; slicks or light treads, not knobbly. The larger wheel makes it faster (because of 'gearing') and the ride a ...


18

I'd go for the air-horn, for example the AirZound. It is my opinion that screaming and yelling (the primal scream) can cause a lot of unnecessary social distress, and is not a good alterntive for traffic communication and signalling under normal conditions. It ends up being more effective when you're in "panic" as said, which is barely a day-by-day ...


17

Lightweight polyester or microfiber materials do the job. Pearl Izumi is my favourite. Bike specific rain jackets are a must if you are looking for comfort. Generally they are very thin and have air vents in them. There is no reason to wear heavy rain jackets. Instead, layer up up with a base layer (often merino wool or synthetic thermals) + mid layer + the ...


16

I would never use anything but a trailer for safety reasons alone. The amount of force which can be applied to a small child's head from a fall from a bike seat can cause a severe injury. Even as an adult riding carefully on a bike path I've had an accident (dog running in front of me). With a trailer it is nearly impossible to flip or cause other blunt ...


15

Screaming is faster and much more effective: I suspect it's usually best. Or use an electric horn or air horn. About screaming: The BHSI writes as follows. We don't find that horns do much for safety on a bicycle. Your voice is faster to react and adapts better to different situations. The primal scream produces good adrenalin-based reactions in ...


14

For practical day to day commuting I would stay away from a fixie because: You are not a very experienced cyclist, riding a fixie in traffic is actually not that easy. No fenders, so dirty clothes/mud in the face on rainy days. No rear-rack, so for luggage you are forced to use a backpack. I also wouldn't go for the type of urban bike you link because: ...


14

Flat pedals are great for lots of reasons, but I won't get into the virtues or pitfalls of platforms versus toe clips versus clipless systems (though I am a big fan of plain old platform pedals.) I will try to give information pertaining to the different styles and a few examples rather than an exhaustive list of specific brands and prices. There are lots ...


13

I would defiantly not rush out and buy a new expensive bike. Here are the steps you should follow: 1) Try to make your bike faster. There are a few ways that you can do this but I am going to make two suggestions that will be cheap and easy. Get slick (smooth) tires. The should put you back around $60 but should give you a good idea of what a road ...


12

Just about any tire is going to be vulnerable to punctures especially as they age/wear. I've found the Continental Gatorskin tires to be effective and I match them with Mr. Tuffy tire inserts. As long as I check the tires for embedded thorns/glass every few weeks, I can go a few thousand road miles or more without a flat. The downside of using inserts and ...


12

50 miles per day is a fair amount of riding. 4 hours sounds about right when you take into account traffic stops, hills, etc. If you're not used to putting in this kind of distance -- not to mention a full day's work too -- then it's not surprising that you're tired. Before splurging on a new bike, try some of the modifications others have suggested. ...


12

We live in the country, and ride on gravel roads pretty much exclusively. We used a trailer for years and have kept it even though the kids outgrew it long ago. It remains useful years later when the kid(s) are riding solo. Our trailer is over 20 years old and we used it just last week, riding out to pick up our CSA veggies, which probably weighed more than ...


11

Things to consider are that when you buy a new bike it is a mix of different components, which are then packaged together and you receive a discount on the sum of the parts. This means that different manufacturers attempt to save money by using cheaper items for certain pieces of the overall puzzle. The major headline items are the frame, gear system, ...


11

I'll not speak for the trailer, so much as against the rear child bike seat. My sister, was at 2 years old, riding in a high quality, bike shop sold and properly mounted bike seat. She was strapped in, and all was well. My dad was the captain of the vessel, and they were having a grand time. My dad hit a broken bottle on the road. Never saw it, he said. ...


11

Firstly, 11 or 12 mph isn't that slow, especially if you're still working on improving your fitness. Try measuring speed in kph instead of mph, as it feels better. You can laugh, but we all do it! The main thing you should look for in a new bike, IMO is that it fits you. This will improve your comfort. If you're comfortable you'll be able to go faster. Drop ...


10

I bicycle year round in the Pacific Northwest and follow the mantra: there is no inappropriate weather, only inappropriate clothing. (Well, snow and ice may be inappropriate weather for bicycling) Despite commuting daily, I only purchased dedicated cycling rain gear yesterday -- and only did that for better visibility and more convenient pocket locations. ...


10

I wear a pair of Austin Pedal shoes by Keen to work at my government office every day. They're a fine shoe—they look decent and accept SPD's. They aren't anything special. There is no gore-tex liner (I think it'd be overkill for my commute most days). There is no reflective tab, though that would be nice. There is no carbon-reinforced toe-box—also ...


10

I've been using Shimano A530 pedals for that purpose. Mountain SPD-compatible clip on one side, with a nice wide flat platform on the other. I've also used the old Shimano M324 pedals, but prefer the slightly lighter weight and lower profile of the A530s. Note that other foot retention systems, such as PowerGrips and the like, will work with all shoes ...


10

If you don't want to spend lots of money you can still get the most relevant characteristics in a pair of safety glasses. You can find these at just about any hardware store and they: wrap around, are impact resistant, block UV, don't look half bad come in clear and tinted (and are cheap enough to get one of each usually)


9

Rainclothes designed for cycling, preferably in a material that "breathes" (Goretex being the best known, I think). You will still get wet from the inside if you go too fast, but this type of material is way better than "non-breathing" varieties. I have a Gore Bike Wear Path jacket and pants that I am pretty happy with. Rainclothes for biking is essential ...


9

You are getting some good advice here on rain jackets, but the part of the accessory for cycling in rain that I find critical are a good quality overshoes - especially for commuting. There is nothing more annoying for me that arriving to work and have the shoes and socks wet, there is no chance for them to dry completely before the journey back home so you ...


9

As with any other equipment, it depends on how much you would like to spend... The main difference between a cheap and a better bike is the quality of the materials and the comfort/performance they provide! I have several cheap bikes and two "better" bikes, the differences between these are: better derailleur system, both the front and back, it makes a ...


8

I'm going to take a stab at answering the question, with the added spin of my comment above. What you need at this point is enough information so you can go into a shop and try a few bikes, so the shop doesn't try to sell you the bike they have, rather than the bike you need: I bike suited for commuting bikes and a bike you'd ride on the weekends aren't ...


8

Hybrid bikes are good for urban riding, they will often come with fatter tires that will provide a better ride on rough pavement. These tires also don't easily slide into grooves like street car tracks, storm sewer grates, etc, which can cause falls. You'll also have the flexibility to take shortcuts through parks etc if you want to. I would have a look ...


8

I am going to second @freiheit suggestion that you reconsider the drop bars. You commute is going to be roughly 90+ minutes each way in an urban setting and you will want the extra had positions. You can still get a geometry that is relaxed and gives you a more upright position. When my commute got longer (15+ miles one way) I switched from a converted ...


8

Another option is to have a rack on your car to transport your bike, then. You drive to the outside of the town where you work and park before you hit the traffic jams then get the bike of the car and cycle past all the traffic jams And/Or Day 1 am – you drive to work Day 1 pm – you leave your car at work and cycle home Day 2 am – you cycle to work ...


8

As well as getting a powerful set of front lights on your bike, get yourself a good head torch (or helmet light). You wish to light what you are trying to look at that may not be in the same direction your front wheel is pointing. Combining two front lights so you have a wide beam and a long beam can work well. By using two lights you have a backup when ...



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