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27

Bicycle helmets contain crushable foam that works to extend the duration of impact by about 6 ms (milliseconds). This doesn't make the impact force disappear, instead it extends the duration of force experienced by the brain. By extending the duration, you reduce the peak force. The brain can withstand impacts to some degree, however if the impact is too ...


11

While you can certainly wear BMX armour, or possibly even use motorbike armour and wear full face helmets, I would put much more emphasis on changing the way you cycle to reduce the risk from cars. You say cars turn without seeing cyclists- well, you have two options: become more visible. It isn't high fashion, but wear colours and lights, flashing and ...


11

There's not much more to say than: tuck your head, protect your face with your arms, relax, and wait for it to be over. Realistically, though, you're not going to remember the contents of this post the next time shit hits the fan and you find yourself tumbling on the asphalt. But if you can manage any of these things, you'll hopefully minimize the chance of ...


11

I suggest following a short course in some martial arts class where you can learn to fall correctly (Judo would be my suggestion) there is nothing you can read that will prepare you for a fall and that will suppress the reflex to stick out your arm to catch yourself (and possibly break it); only practice will have you instead tuck in that arm provide a ...


9

Im not an expert, but i would say probably not safe. Things that are good at deflecting small fast moving objects arent always good at absorbing crushing force. Bike helmets are designed to absorb most of the force from the impact as to protect your dome from it. I am not sure how well an army helmet will do in this regard. A good analogy might be using a ...


8

In my experience, things happen so fast it is practically impossible to react with some kind of plan. I have fallen over when I couldn't unclip fast enough (in other words, when the bike was stopped at a light or similar), and those were the only times where I knew I was falling and could actually spend a fraction of a second looking for something to grab, ...


7

To some extent, you can actually "learn" to fall. The problem is that the learning has to be "motor learning" and not just thinking about it. In other words, you have to train your nervous system to do it through practice. Some of the best bike handling I've ever seen has been from people who ride single track (mountain biking). This type of riding ...


6

How do downhill riders cope with this? With a front fender or with a mud guard such as this. With goggles which use disposable tear off lenses or the ones with a reel of fresh len material which is pulled via a string or via bluetooth or something. Does the full-face helmet protect the mask in some way? Probably not. Do they apply anti-water ...


6

You can get explicit cycling knee warmers - I have a pair of these which see a lot of use (and sometimes go under jeans, very comfortably, if I'm out of an evening too). They are great for the morning commutes where it is cold but likely to be warmer by the time of the return journey, but also for the longer rides where you start colder than you'll finish ...


5

I'm going to assume you're a bright Stanford kid, and that your brain will remember this. Work = F * d Work = Force * distance Try punching your arch nemesis for an instant. Just hit him for a second and as soon as you touch him, pull your hand back. Nothing happens. Now when you punch, punch behind him. Keep pushing, all the way through, pushing pushing ...


4

Frankly, what you want is impossible. A good bicycle helmet provides substantial protection from head-impacts-pavement and head-impacts-vehicle events, but basically only those where the velocities involved are small. The helmet functions by slowing the skull down slowly, avoiding the skull-brain impact which often does the most damage. But, where the ...


4

I ride a motorcycle on the freeway (interstate for those back east) and you have to live with the fact that if you are hit by a car there is really nothing you can wear to protect you the way you would like. A helmet will protect your head from the impact of you falling 6 feet to the ground going 20 MPH, but I have yet to see one that will fully protect you ...


4

I use helicopter tape. You can find it on Amazon or from most any race car supply shop. It's a little pricey but well worth it. It's very sticky and thick enough to absorb impacts from rocks. I use it on the bottom side of my downtube, on the drive side chain stay, and anywhere a cable is close to the frame.


3

You could try soccer socks, with or without shin guards. They cover the part of legs usually affected by vegetation, and are somewhat sports-oriented. At least since soccer players usually get covered with sweat on hot days, I guess these equipment are design to handle that. The shin guards are usually worn inside the socks, but if the vegetation damages ...


2

I have used shin guards since the 1980s, growing up in Hawaii and now riding in Utah (both get pretty hot) and I found that wearing knee high socks help with the "heat" factor, but even then, as long as I am wearing shorts, I dont even think about my legs being warm. I have been using the LizardSkin shinguards (http://bit.ly/L188ZV) for about 15 years now ...


2

You could use a pair of these stickers. As far as I know most road cleats are plastic cleats and are not going to do significant damage to the shoe (being plastic and large rather than metal and small) so no protection is needed. (There are some road cleats which are metal, as described in comments.)


2

As an ex BMX rider I feel quite confident to fall (you crash alot when you try things). But that's not the case for commuting/road bike, in fact you can't do anything, maybe beside falling on mats (and still it sounds weird to practise it). What really could be good is building muscles that will hold your bones in place, when you flip over. Anyway, the best ...


2

I would look for evidential based information regarding brain stem injuries these helmets could/would have prevented, preferably published in medical journals, that a standard helmet would not. I think you find it fairly thin on the ground. (If anyone has such evidence, I am happy to retract this answer) The reason I say this is if you look at a ...


1

Fortunately I haven't had much practical experience with falling, but I'd always been told to stay clipped in, hold on to the handlebars and land on your side. In my single bike accident I did this and came out mostly unscathed, with a few minor scrapes. If I were willing to put in the practice and teach my body to fall, there are probably more effective ...


1

Ride a mountain bike and fall a bunch. Usually less chance of getting hurt on trails and it does train you to fall right without thinking about it. Probably not practical if you don't own or care to own a mountain bike, or you have no trails nearby. That said, if you go down on pavement at speed your going to get hurt at least a little, and sometimes it ...


1

Yes, martial arts is the way to go and I am talking from experience. I am a black belt in ju jutsu and I have my brain "fully programmed" for falling correctly. Once I had a frontal collision with another biker and was uninjured because I fell correctly. But all this is easily said than done. Start here: http://judoinfo.com/ukemi.htm The first one, the ...


1

I wear MEC Roubaix Tights down to about -10c and haven't had any problems with my legs or knees getting cold. The front and backs are made of different materials so the front of your legs stay warm because they stop the wind, and you legs stay cool (not sweating hot) because the backs are breathable and let the heat generated by your muscles out. I'm on my ...


1

A protective covering is useful on the chainstay if it is prone to frequent chainslap. Other than that, I'd say that it is worse to try to protect your frame with tape than to just allow it to get an occasional nick and scuff. On a practical note, if you do get some paint chip on a steel frame it is a good idea to dab a little clear nail polish on it to ...



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