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38

Advantages: Fast - generally these fill up your tire much faster than you could with a pump Less effort - hook up, push button, no pumping Possibly less weight (but I haven't compared weight of smallest pumps to CO2) Lower initial investment - a valve and 2 cartridges generally seems to be cheaper than a good small pump. Disadvantages: Consumable ...


25

I'm surprised nobody else has mentioned this. Probably the most legitimate purpose of CO2 inflators for bicycles is for inflating tubeless tires. If you need to replace or repair a tubeless tire, chances are you will have zero luck inflating the tire if you try to use a hand pump. You either need to use an air compressor (good luck carrying that with you on ...


19

The answer, in short is: Can you? In some cases, yes. Should you? In most cases, no. The long answer: The reason you can sometimes use an automotive air-pump on a bicycle tire/tube is because they share an identical valve. (See: Schrader valve/Schrader tube in the Terminology Index). If you have this type, you will definitely be able to get air into your ...


15

If you're at home, use a floor pump. They are very easy to use and have a gauge so you can measure the pressure. When you're on the road, the quickest and easiest way to get you back on the road is to use CO2 cannisters. They are not that cheap though and the CO2 will leak out of the tube faster than air (mostly N2), requiring topping up over the next few ...


14

Disadvantage: Environmentally irresponsible. It seems to me that there is a lot of energy contained within, and required to make, that CO2 cartridge for a single tyre inflation. I do carry one for emergencies 'in case of pump failure' but I try my best to never use it out of laziness.


13

What I find helps, is: tap the valve post a bit to let out a small blast of air (after loosening the captive nut all the way, of course). That helps unstick things and lowers the pressure inside a bit to make it easier to start pumping air in. Just takes a quick tap. If you don't do that, you may need to pump slightly past the pressure of the tire to ...


13

It's a "dunlop" valve. Also called "woods". I used to see this years ago in BMX bikes. For best results we'd use to have a schrader adapter (google: dunlop to schrader adapter) so we could inflate with schrader pumps.


12

Bike shops advertise them because they're consumable items. Every time you use a cartridge the shop is likely to make another sale. Whereas a good pump should last through many, many flats and is less likely to get good placement in the shop. For advantages/disadvantages, see freiheit's answer.


12

Note: this calculation makes many assumptions, so it's only useful in an 'average use case', not some sort of exact measurement. If you find better information, please post it and I'll update the answer. How many pumps you would need to fill up a tire depends on many variables. First, the volume of your inner tube, which can be approximated as a torus ...


10

Yes, this is no problem, though I would suggest practicing once before you have to use it on a flat. The first couple of times I used an inflator I had trouble inflating my tire fully. No, but I've found that once I start a cartridge it will leak slowly, so it doesn't last forever. In my experience it doesn't last more than a few hours, certainly not more ...


10

That is a Presta Valve. Your pump, I am going to guess, is a Schrader Valve. You can buy a Presta pump from a shop or buy a $2 adapter.


10

Those valve stems are too short for those deep deep rims you've got on there. You can tell just from the photos that the valve stem isn't sticking out far enough from the rim for the pump to fit all the way on it. Hence, it's not contacting the valve enough for you to inflate your tires.


8

You press the chuck onto the valve, then pull the lever up to lock the chuck to the valve. Otherwise pressure could blow the chuck off on higher pressure tires.


8

Don't bother with an air compressor. Get a proper bike pump. They are cheaper, and will fill a tire to 60 psi with minimal effort. A good bike pump will also require less maintenance. Also it'll only take a couple pumps to top up your tires. Much less time than to drag out a big air compressor. Have you had problems with standard floor/track pumps? What ...


7

You can do this in a pinch if you're careful, but I don't recommend it. Your tires need to have Schraeder valves (similar to car tires) or you'll need an adapter for a Presta valve. Fill the tire in very short bursts, checking the pressure in between. Err on the side of underfilling your tires -- put too much air in and you may blow the tire off the rim, ...


7

It is for adjusting the suspension on a medium to high-end mountain bike (fork), hence the lack of 'Presta' option. Since you will be returning it, to keep the shop happy and get what you really need, consider getting: A track pump with gauge and aluminium body. Look for one with a well engineered head that does Presta and Shrader valves. The easiest ones ...


7

There are two main standards: Schrader and Presta. Schrader is the standard auto tire valve, while Presta is thinner and has a little knurled knob on top. Schader is relatively straight-forward to use while Presta requires a little finesse. Most newer "floor pump" valves are "agnostic" and will fit either style without conversion, but some require ...


7

Can I calculate (approximately) how much air pressure is lost by measuring the hose length and diameter? No, you cannot tell how much pressure is lost based on the size of the hose. This is not because there is not enough information to tell but because the hose is irrelevant. You seem to be under the impression that there is some total amount of ...


6

I used to skin my knuckles every time I took the chuck off the valve. Then I figured it out (pain is a learning curve accelerator). Position the wheel so the presta valve is closest to you and pointed away from you. Use your thumbs on either side of the wheel to push the chuck straight off (toward the hub of the wheel). This prevents the presta stem from ...


6

I have had such experiences even at much lower pressures, (I ride diverse disciplines of mountain bike, so I use my tires around 40 PSI, but still...). I have found three main causes for inflation difficulty: I will discard air leaks as this one is pretty obvoius. 1) Faulty valve: Some valves get somewow obstructed, and won't get air in as easily as it ...


5

The CO2 inflater is, for me, only an emergency option. It lives in my saddle bag to get me home after a flat. I haven't rigorously investigated it, but anecdotally I think that tyres inflated with CO2 deflate by themselves more quickly than air-inflated tyres do. Fortunately I haven't punctured too much recently, but the last couple of roadside fixes with ...


5

The liters/minute capacity of a compressor says nothing about it's max pressure. Most compressors intended for air tool use are good to about 100psi, maybe 120, but you need to make sure before you spend your money -- the compressor needs to do maybe 30% higher pressure than your "target" pressure, or you'll be forever waiting for the tires to fill. But as ...


5

I figured out what was wrong and managed to fix it. It was a minor enough issue that I'm not going to return the pump. As shown in the image above, the pressure gauge is protected by a plastic cover. It's pretty easy to slide this cover up the shaft of the pump and out of the way. Once this is out of the way, the pressure gauge can be removed by ...


5

A shock pump is designed to fill a very small volume of space with very high air pressures. A tire pump is designed to fill a large volume of air, to relatively low pressures, pretty quickly. You can technically fill a schrader valve tube using a shock pump, but because the volume of air for each repetition of the pump will be so low, it might take a week ...


5

A seat post pump would offer a type of convenience that may not be applicable to a wide range of riders. High-end seat posts are made out of carbon fiber. Even many mid-range aluminum bikes have carbon-fiber seat posts. Using an aluminum seat post pump would negate the benefits of carbon seat posts. CO2 canister pumps offer more convenience than a seat ...


5

A longer frame pump is advantageous - a lot of them can be mounted along the length of your top tube and work a lot faster/easier than mini pumps. Mini pumps (and frame pumps in general) always take forever (at least, it feels like forever, though some are better than others due to chamber size and if they can inflate on the push and pull stroke of the ...


4

The main benefit that I get from using a CO2 inflater over using a pump is time savings. The CO2 will fill your tire with air faster than a pump. I always carry a pump in addition to a CO2 inflater because the pump provides unlimited air. It's a good idea to be prepared to handle at least 2 flats so the pump is a nice backup. I would consider just ...


4

My advice: Get a floor pump with a pressure gauge and an easy way to switch between shraeder and presta. and get one that is servicable. I have the topeak Joe Blow. Take a look at the dual nozzle. Also get a portable pump. There are several kinds that unfold and remove the pain of portable pumps (I could never get a good pressure in those because they ...


4

I think there are 3 main factors when reviewing a pump. Valve connection method, clamp/screw. Valve support (not every pump supports both types of bike valve, but most do) How high a pressure tire do you need? (some road bikes need really high, > 100 psi). A lot of modern pumps use a clamp to secure to the valve. These tend to be awkward when you're ...



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