Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

24

I haven't tried them specifically with goatheads, but I've run through nails, staples, glass and just about anything else you could find in an urban environment on Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires. I have never had a flat over thousands of miles with their Marathon Supremes, either--and they're much lighter and better riding--but they're not as puncture-proof ...


21

The back wheel is the wheel bearing most of the weight and also the wheel providing the driving force. For these 2 reasons it is likely that the forces being exerted between the wheel and surface are much greater on the rear wheel than on the front. This makes it more likely that you will get punctures on the rear wheel than the front - all other things ...


17

Pinch flats are due to under-inflation of tires. On a road bike you should be inflating your tires to 120-130 lbs. Also, you need to check and re-inflate your tires every time you ride. I just keep my pump right next to my bike, and wind up adding air every 2nd or 3rd day. I see you added tire size - those are older bike tires, they don't inflate as high ...


16

There are a number of things you can do: Puncture resistant tires. These have kevlar/aramid belting in the tire, thicker rubber or other features that make them harder to puncture. Would need to know more specifics about your bike (especially wheel/rim size) to be able to suggest specific tires, but Specialized, Continental, Schwalbe, and pretty much ...


15

Though there no doubt are "puncture-resistant" tires that seek to accomplish that end by means of extra-thick rubber, for the past 15-20 years the standard for puncture resistance has been Kevlar belted tires, which look and ride like ordinary tires and weight essentially the same as ordinary tires (maybe a few grams more). The Kevlar belt under the tread ...


15

The object that pierced the tire and tube may have been left behind or it might be embedded in the tire but hidden in the rubber. This can happen with small pieces of glass, wire, or thorns, especially in thicker treaded tires such as those found on a mountain bike. When the rubber of the tire is compressed against the ground the offending object will stick ...


13

I would carry at least one unpatched, pristine tube as a spare. Put the patched ones on the bike or keep for repairs at home. The idea being that when you need it -- in the middle of nowhere, in the dark and pouring rain -- you're guaranteed that the old patches aren't peeling off or weakened and the tube should "just work". Then swap it for a patched ...


13

I believe what you're describing is the "Rim Tape". The rim tape covers up the holes in the rim (wheel) that the spokes attach through. Without that tape covering the holes, the innertube (air chamber) will be exposed to holes and sharp surfaces that are likely to cause another flat tire. If the rim tape is torn in one spot, but still covering all of those ...


12

Just about any tire is going to be vulnerable to punctures especially as they age/wear. I've found the Continental Gatorskin tires to be effective and I match them with Mr. Tuffy tire inserts. As long as I check the tires for embedded thorns/glass every few weeks, I can go a few thousand road miles or more without a flat. The downside of using inserts and ...


12

smaller hole in the rim is good (presta +) schrader has piece that inserts into the valve (screws in) with a spring mechanism to seal it - these parts sometimes fail (schrader -) presta uses tire pressure to seal it (presta +) rocks can lodge in uncapped schrader and cause leaks (schrader -) presta does not need a valve cap to keep rocks out (presta +) ...


12

Every once in a while it is just bad luck. Most of the time though, if you've fitted a new tube and it starts to leak within minutes, that means you have something on the inside of your tire that is causing the leak. A thorn, piece of glass or debris, etc. Usually you can find the culprit if you very very thoroughly run your fingers along the inside of the ...


11

Presta's main benefit is more about how the valve functions, in regards to getting pumped up to higher pressures. Because the stem of the valve needs pressure in the pump head to get high enough before it pushes the valve stem in, and start flowing air into the tire, when you try to get to 120 to 160 lbs of pressure it works better than a Schrader valve ...


11

Thin tires do get punctured more easily. They also require that you fill them up more often, as they have a smaller volume of air, and at a much higher pressure, and therefore more quickly drop to a non-optimal pressure. Also, narrow tires will not be able to absorb as much impact as a wider mountain bike style tire, and therefore potholes and other ...


11

Sometimes it can be hard to find a small hole. Sometimes it helps to mix water and dish soap together and either pour that over the partially inflated tire, scanning for leaks or submerging the tire in a bucket of soapy water. The soap will bubble and make holes more apparent. You also probably want to immerse the valve to see if the leak may be ...


10

The Schwalbe Marathon Plus (not just the Marathon) is widely regarded as the most flat-proof tire out there. It's also heavy and expensive, but if your priority is avoiding punctures, I don't think it can be beaten. ISTR reading about a round-the-world rider completing 50,000 miles on a pair without a flat. Specialized Armadillos are not, in my experience, ...


10

Inflate your tires to a higher pressure. Use a pump with a pressure gauge instead of going by "feel". Check the pressure more often. The max pressure listed on the sidewall is a good starting point, but if you're already inflating to max psi, you may want to exceed it a bit. It's likely you have a slow leak, and you're at a low inflation pressure by the ...


9

I find the bigger problem is not the number of patches, but rather the age of the patches. There is a correlation though, in that by the time you have patched a tube for the third time, I find that the first patch is starting to get a little suspect. In my student days I would patch a tube four or five times, but I often had patches eventually fail. ...


9

It depends on where you are and the conditions. My little tip is: Have the tube slightly inflated before putting the tyre around it. Have the tyre completely off the rim. Put the ...


9

They are for old "Dunlop" or "Woods" valves, that were halfway in size between a presta & schrader valve. Just inside the cap (that you could screw off) was the rubber tube that acted as the valve. If it split or broke (usually when the rubber perished) you could replace it and be on your way again. We have Dunlop valves described in the Terminology ...


9

It is the Dunlop valve, it was used a lot in Holland, UK, etc. You can see it in action here: But currently it is replace by the Blitz:


9

How about recycling them yourself? Here are some ideas posted on the brilliant BikeHacks website. Shoelaces, wallet, yarn, handlebar tape, top tube passenger seat, dog lead, Maglite handlebar attachment, rack, key chain bling, bike bell, repaired bike seat...


9

In my experience: You only need to apply a drop of glue a bit larger than a pea (about 7mm diameter) per patch; Glue inside eventually dries. If you only have a puncture once a year, most probably the glue remaining from the last puncture would be dry "no matter what". Also, there is an expiration date of around two years, but I think it's two years if you ...


9

When you remove all the thorns very carefully you could keep using the tire. Unfortunately this might be some hassle with 30+ thorns and you can not be a 100% sure that you really have removed all of them. Also some may have broken off in a way that you see the remains from neither inside nor outside but the remains may be pushed further inside after some ...


8

You are trading in 'road feel' and perhaps increasing your rolling resistance for durability. For example, a set of Vittoria Open Corsa tyres have 320 tpi (threads per inch) and are quite supple. They will, to some people, give the perception of a smoother ride with less rolling resistance. The same could be said for many of the higher end race tyres. By ...


8

Check inside the rim at the point where the punctures occur. Is the rim tape intact? Does a spoke push through when weight is placed on the bike? One of my friends had a problem like this, and it turned out that when he sat on the bike his weight caused the end of a spoke to push through the rim and puncture his tyre.


8

Could be a faulty valve that only leaks under high pressure. You won't be able to find this kind of thing by putting it under water because there's no way you'll get the tube up to 100 psi while it isn't on the rim with the tire on. It could also be due to very very small holes in the tube, again which don't make any difference until the tire is at very ...


8

Are the holes always on the tread side of the tube? Do you often go over curbs or other large bumps with the bike? The possibilities are: you're damaging the tube when you change/patch it you're running over a lot of thorns/tacks you're getting "snakebite" flats from running the pressure too low someone has it in for you and is "helping" the tire go flat ...


8

If you can't find anything, and you've been cycling off-road or up and down curbs, then it could be a pinch flat. They occur when you hit something and the tyre compresses so much that the inner tube gets squashed between the rim of your bike and the object you hit. This can cause a hole in the tyre. More often though, this kind of puncture looks like a ...


8

From personal experience, I'd say a larger-than-usual hole in the tire could have these undesireable side-effects: The tube might get a bit exposed, and the day-to-day rolling over the hole might wear it down until the tire eventually flats out. Chemical aggresion from road grime or mud could also be involved. The fabric of the tire might get damaged to ...


8

Basically the same deal as the question about mounting a tire. Make sure all the air is out of the tube If possible, pop just one side of the bead all the way around the wheel. Popping one side only will give the bead more room in the well in the middle of the rim, and thus give you more bead to pull over the top of the rim on the opposite side Begin to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible