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0

I had a problem with my wheels and the innertubes getting into the gaps, tried every thickness of rim tape, in the end got some velo plugs and then put electrical tape over each one to keep them in place. Veloplugs shouldn't need tape but the holes were odd. After that spokes keep breaking and I just decided the wheels were crap and sucked up the cost of new ...


6

Bald-ness isn't a problem on tires used on roads. In fact, it's favorable. I'd replace the tire once I start getting flats (or a bit before), or seeing canvas. The primary advantage of tubeless would let you run lower pressures (since you can't pinch flat a tube if it isn't there) which is useful for running big tires while mountain biking for more grip ...


2

If you purely have a puncture by a pin, small nail, or fragment of glass, and the hole in the tire is just a puncture and not a slit, then there is no need to do anything special with the tire -- just put in a fresh (new or repaired) tube and go. You do need to be concerned if the puncture somehow causes a cut in the tire, with a dimension of more than ...


3

The size of the puncture really dictates whether a new tire is in order... that being said, if you patch your tube and inflate the tire (the one with the puncture) you want to make sure the tube is not exposed through the puncture hole. If you need to ride and the tyre is questionable... an old trick is to put a dollar bill or power bar wrapper on the ...


9

While we don't do product reviews, note that puncture resistant doesn't mean puncture proof -- with any air based system, you're going to run the risk of cutting the tire and tube and getting a flat. Some tires are better than others in terms of puncture protection, using things like kevlar belts. The tires you bought trade off for some more the weight and ...



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