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1

Your solutions have all pretty much been said, it seems to be a problem with the rim. However, instead of just checking the rim tape, check the whole inner rim to make sure there are no metal shards or other pokey things embedded in the bottom or inner walls. This happens a lot with v-brakes especially, so be aware. Speaking of brakes, I also wanted to ...


4

I agree with your diagnosis: it must be related to the rim tape. Take it off and inspect it and the rim below. If you don't find anything obvious, buy new, good quality rim tapes, check there are no sharp edges, and reinstall.


0

Okay, im sitting stranded outside a 711, just popped my FRONT tube this time. But, i think i finally figured out my issue!! So I've been getting a ton of flats, all mainly in the back tire, since i started riding Almost a year ago. For that year ive been goin to the same bike shop, and buying the same CST tubes. Again, they say they can take 65 psi, but ...


0

I have had the same baffling issue lately, and I still don't have a positive identification of the cause for the puncture: I just got the second puncture on the inside (toward the spokes) of the tube. I have adhesive-backed cloth rim tape, so I'm sure that's not moving; I installed the tube by hand, and I'm certain it wasn't kinked or nicked by a ...


2

Wow this is the flat tire question that just keeps on rolling In review: Installed a cheap 26 X 1.25 Problems from day one Patched tire with tire and even more problems exactly where the tire patch was Installed another cheap 26 X 1.25 and put in preemptive complete tire patch using the last 1.25 and nothing but problems Stop using: Cheap ...


0

Currently I weight around 300 lbs, ride bicycle daily 10-20km, and did not have flat for months. Yes you need decent tires, and you have to inflate them properly. Search the web for the puncture resistant tires, and choose one that has best reputation. They cost much more than bargain tires, but when you factor in how much it cost to change inner tubes ...


1

They say they take 65 psi, but I've had them pop at 55-60, so I keep them at 45psi, 50 if I can get away with it, and sometimes 35-40 if I'm using my little hand pump Well, there's your problem. 40 PSI is just not enough pressure for a 1.25" tire, especially if it's carrying a lot of weight. You're probably getting pinch flats from hitting potholes and ...


1

I'm not sure weight is the main issue. There are several questions on this site from people weighing more than you, and the general advice seems to be that it should be fine. Sure, more weight puts bike under more stress, but bikes are generally fairly sturdy. But make sure that there are no missing spokes, and check regularly if there are cracks in the rim ...


3

Firstly, you are one impressively persistent woman! Yes, of course weight is a factor. You just need equipment that will deal with it. In addition to the points made by jqning, I'm thinking that several things can help you Larger and better tires would help. I checked out the Electra website, but couldn't be sure which bike you have. Some do have bigger ...


-1

@andy256 First let me say, this is my first time using this site so im still trying to figure things out, lol....still not sure if I am using this correctly. But thanks for editing my comment. Its a lot harder to make sure you capitalize every "I" and add the correct punctuaction and whatnot on a phone. 😊 @jqning Thank you for your answer! However i am ...


4

I typed this whole answer and then decided to cut to the chase, which I doing here. IF you do not have a tiny splinter hidden in the tire I think you are pinching the tube between the tire and the rim during installation. This explains the flats at 50-60 lbs. Losing weight is not the problem. It might be part of the problem - that is to say that someone who ...


0

Rim strips are not expensive, so if you have doubts, get a fresh rim strip. What they call "rim tape" in this "how to install a rim strip" video is actually what most refer to as a rim strip; rim tape is different. In any case, since you've had two tubes fail in the same location, I'd suggest that you not see if a third one will do the same. Regarding a ...


2

One way to get tears around the valve stem is by not supporting the pump head and stem while you're pumping up the tire with a frame pump (the kind where you are pushing on the stem as you pump up the tire, like in the photo below). Notice the way the person's left hand is holding the pump and the rim. The idea is to stabilize the head of the pump so that ...


1

Learn how to bunny hop. When you're heading over a pothole you don't have to jump it, but apply the same idea of shifting your weight to be nice to the tires. When you approach a curb, you lift the front wheel as best you can (I can't actually do a bunny hop) and then shift your weight to it before the back wheel hits.


1

Stans No Tubes and other tubeless systems with sealant will provide you much greater resistance to both "puncture" flats from glass, nails etc, AND from "pinch flats" or "snakebites". The sealant will seal holes from quite large nails or other debris and the tubeless tyre can't really get a pinch flat because there is no tube inside it to pinch. Having ...


4

I know there are a few answers here but they don't address the tonus solid or tubless. Here is you problem: I don't know exactly the amount of pressure, but always that I inflate the tires, are really "tight" you could say. "Tight" is not good enough. Check pressure without a gauge. Get a real pressure gauge. They are not expensive and inflate ...


3

I would try buying a set of 28mm tires (or larger). You can run them at a lower pressure than a 23mm or 25mm and doing so won't likely cause the bite puncture you are experiencing b/c the air chamber is much larger and thus has more area to compress before it nips at the tube. An upside is that the ride quality is far superior to say, a 23mm. Also, make ...


11

You are correct that the type of puncture you're getting is caused by the rim "pinching" the inner tube. The root cause here is one of the following: pressure too low (most likely) You're not avoiding potholes carefully enough Weight is too high for the tires/terrain. This has nothing to do with fixies except perhaps that people on fixies tend to ...


4

You are asking about converting inner tubes to tubeless. As far as I know, tubeless system isn't 100% puncture proof, if you get a nail on the road, it's impossible to fix right away and you need to call a taxi. For me, inner tubes are still the best options for bike commuting. I can think of several ways: Purchase a bike pump with psi gause, so you can ...


2

I ride a fixie for city commuting in a city full bad of roads and the advice I can give is Buy a good pair of tires. I use Maxxis Re-Fuse and can't complain at all, they are pretty strong and not expensive (they aren't cheap though), I've ride them literally over broken bottle shards and survived. Some friends of mine have Black Mamba tires and they seem ...


0

What type of flats do you suffer from ? Punctures ? How much do you ride ? How often do you have flats ? How much pressure do you have in your tire ? If it's too low it might be the cause of your flats. Tires will lose pressure over time so you need to re-inflate them periodically. How old are your tires ? If they are too thin they will be prone to flats, ...



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