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1

Yes the tube size should match the tire size. But a smaller tube will stretch. Too big a tube may fold. Max means max. If the the tire says 85 psi max then that is the max. If you weigh 180 then run the tire at or near the maximum. Do not put 116 PSI in that tire. Even if you have the wrong size tube pressure is still based on tire (not tube).


-1

put carnations condensed concentrated milk into your tube take out valve stem get a applicator bottle u need a hose that will either snug over stem or inner to fill up tube use half a can to a can per tube 3 fl oz should due. this id recommend if u are a green slime believer depending on thickness and type tires entry level regular tires no high end racing ...


0

Walmart was selling foam inserts that would replace the tube. This would eliminate any chance of a puncture. The disadvantage was weight. The one I handled was about 50% heavier then a convenrtional tire and tube.


1

A more puncture resistant tyre isn't going to necessarily help in this situation. If you've come out of work and you've got a flat, it seems like a slow leak. If you didn't find anything in the tyre the 2nd time, I would be checking how you've seated the tyre on the rim, have you accidentally pinched the tube a bit, are the valves in good working order, are ...


5

There are a few things to do. I'd start by reading this link from Sheldon Brown. First determine how the flats are occurring. Inspect the tube. Is the rim tape on the rim properly? (if not, you'll see a puncture on the wheel side) Is the tube being pinch flatted? (a snakebite flat, two very closely placed punctures - usually a sign of too low pressure) ...


1

1) Check and double check for objects in the tire again. Little shards may be completely embedded into the tire. I once had to go through 3 flats, searching every time, before finally finding the little bastard. Bending the tire inwards might help. 2) The Smart Sam exists in a "Plus" version with a 3 mm puncture guard. So if you like the Smart Sam, check ...


0

Two answers suggest tubeless but I am not aware of any tubeless fat rims or tubeless conversion kits. This is a good video on a DIY fat tubeless conversion Tubeless Fatbike Conversion Update And lots of sealant as you have a lot of rubber to cover Or Slimed tubes as I suggested in a comment. Unless you are riding sand and need the flotation I would ...


0

A large carcass under low pressure is flexible. Due to the unusually large contact patch, the pressure your weight applies to the ground is low Low contact pressure + flexible carcass => reduced risk of penetration. I don't know of any fatbikers running liners, but many do do tubeless to reduce rotating weight and lose the rolling resistance created by ...


0

Though not supported by specialized, your best option is to probably setup your wheels tubeless with tire sealant. Keep an extra bottle of sealant with you just in case you have trouble on the trail and need a refresh, but keep a tube handy if that fails as well. Some folks have had good luck by injecting some tube sealant (like slime) inside their inner ...


-2

By the term bursting "Inner tube bursting" is not caused by the tire but is caused by over inflating. Please get a good quality rubber tube(rubber doesn't change its color when tube is inflated ) Yeah and also a combination of a good tube and tires significantly reduces the risk of flats(especially on a road bike) -I have got a set of tire liners and an ...


2

Yes, better tires can help prevent punctures. It has already been mentioned that there are tires specifically made to enhance puncture resistance. One thing that has not been mentioned is that better tires also have stronger sidewalls to offer more tire support when going over bumps and thus better protect against pinch flats. (Once, I had a cheap tire with ...


3

Yes, absolutely. Spend an extra 20 dollars on good tires and you could save yourself 30 dollars worth of tubes. Plan on spending somewhere around 40 to 50 dollars a tire. Even if tubes were free, the money is worth saving the hours spent on the side of the road dealing with flats. Look for tires in the 'training' or 'commuting' category, for extra puncture ...


0

If the tube leaks out from under the wire bead it will burst. If you had a cheap tire with a stretched bead that can happen. If it is real easy to slide the tire on the rim that is a bad sign. If that was how the burst happened then a new tire would help. This can happen on even a good new tires if you over inflate too far. If it bursts again the you ...


3

Its extremely unlikely for an inner tube to just burst. It sounds like you are suffering from punctures. There are two types of puncture; the first is an object penetrating the tire and inner tube, and the second is a 'pinch' puncture where an impact causes the inner tube to be pinched between the tire and rim. Many bikes (even expensive ones) come with ...


-1

I had similar problem with a tube of super glue. My mother-in-law suggested that I put the tube in the freezer. I actually store the tube in a glass bottle and close the cap - to avoid contact with food. The glue never dries up. You can try the same with your glue.



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