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28

In my experience, a front rim is symmetrical, and it doesn't matter which direction it's in. Unlike the rear wheel, where there's a drivetrain side and a non-drivetrain side, the only place where the quick-release handle can be. However, there are some other considerations to keep in mind: Tires will sometimes have a tread direction. This is usually marked ...


14

Depends on the fork and the brake type used. With disc brakes, don't do it. A disc can generate enough force to pull a wheel. That's why most, if not all new mtb forks come with a bruly, deep recession for the QR and the droupouts face forward. With the caliper on the back of the leg, it wants to drive the hub downward when the brakes are on. If the ...


11

I had a similar problem on my Pugsley, though it was under braking (discs) that I was kicking the wheel around in the dropouts. After talking with the guys at my LBS, I learned that I wasn't putting enough force into the quick release. They said that a good, tight, clamp should leave an imprint of the lever on your palm when you close it. It will be ...


10

Generally the QR lever on the rear tire is on the left, so as to not interfere with the derailer. It makes (a little) sense to put the QR lever of the front tire on the same side (at least if you have any OCD tendencies). But it basically doesn't matter, so long as the tire has no preferred rotation direction (and you don't have something like disk brakes ...


9

I'm not sure if you intend to replace the axles themselves, but AFAIK, most nutted axles are not hollow, which means they can't accommodate QR skewers. If this is true in your case, you will need to replace the axles outright in order to use QR skewers. QR axles for modern hubs do come in a few "standard" sizes, but you will nevertheless want to measure the ...


8

Actually, there can be difference, if you are using disc brakes. For practical reasons, you should put the release on opposite side to the brake rotor to avoid accidentaly touching it. First, it may be still hot from braking, when you need to swap the tire, second, your hands can have oil (or your body oil mixed with sweat) on them and that can be bad for ...


7

If you use a U-lock, you can use Sheldon Brown's lock strategy to lock at least your rear wheel along with the frame. This is the approach I use. Remember: the shorter the U-lock, the safer you are. For your front wheel, you can bring along a second U-lock, a cable, or use pitlocks. For the saddle, simply switch away from a quick-release skewer to an ...


5

There are two types of rear dropout, ones that are vertical and ones that are horizontal. With vertical dropouts you put the gears in top at the back and low at the front. Then you put the wheel in. Then you put some weight on the seat and fold the quick release lever over, applying whatever adjustment needed to get the quick-release tensioned correctly. ...


5

Are the skewers internal-cam or external-cam? Internal-cam QR skewers have more mechanical advantage and allow for more clamping force. They're also less affected by dirt and crud. If you don't have internal-cam skewers, get some. All you ever wanted to know about skewers, courtesy of Sheldon Brown.


5

I have seen this a few times where the axle is just a tad too long. No matter how tight you clamp your QR, it won't be snug enough. Did you buy the frame and build it up yourself? If it is the axle, you can pop the wheel out, remove the QR and take a file to one end or the other. Another possibility is the the wheel was built incorrectly and the axle ...


5

Unless you really care how the bike looks and about extra 50 grams on the bike... Find a piece of old chain. Wash and clean it. Find a piece of old tube, best would be road bike tube. Measure the distance between saddle rails and top chains - double it and you'll need that much of tube and chain. Cut the tube and chain to the measures. Pull the chain ...


4

You should be able to thread a fairly standard cable lock through the rails of the saddle and the rear wheel to secure them to the frame. Use another lock to secure the front wheel to the frame and something immovable - preferably a fixed bike rack. Make sure the cables are thick enough to deter your local class of bike thief. I agree with you about quick ...


3

Pick the bike up so the problem wheel is off the ground. Grasp the tire and push it back and forth (left/right relative to the frame). If you can get any perceptible motion then the bearings are loose and need adjustment. While the wheel is off the ground, spin it and watch the space between the rim and the brake block (assuming you don't have disk ...


3

If I understand the question, I am pretty sure that bicycle tires are heteroflexible, and their orientation, which side, same side, opposite side, does not really matter. However, I have been told it's best to mount them so that the lever itself points to the back of the bicycle, so it does not get trapped in anything and pop open.


3

It depends on the bike. On some bikes simply having the axle all the way seated in the dropouts is sufficient to center the wheel, but in others (generally ones with a bolt-on derailer hanger) the wheel is not self-centering. For this latter case (or if you're a perfectionist with the other type) you look at the spacing between the tire and the frame, ...


3

If you have horizontal drop-outs, you might also have threaded holes for "drop-out adjustment screws". These are M3 screws held in place with firm springs that allow you to finely adjust exactly where in the drop-out the rear axle rests. If you have adjustment screws set-up right, you can be assured that the rear wheel is straight by merely yanking it ...


3

I have this problem myself. Take it as a compliment from your bike--it means you're capable of putting a lot of torque/power through the rear wheel! For me, the solution was to do what you've been doing--clamp down and take your wheel off sparingly. A better solution would be to purchase a quick release skewer with a rougher interface with the dropout. It ...


3

The axles need to be hollow QR axles; if they're solid you obviously can't put the skewer through it. You can replace the axles as well, but that starts raising the complexity level. Otherwise, skewers are basically standard. You'll need to get them in the correct lengths for front and rear. For new, the Shimano ones are quite nice.


2

I don't know if they are still available, but it used to be you could buy a rather simple device... Likely not hard to make one. Essentially, a "star-fangled nut" was inserted into the bottom of the seatpost, and an eyebolt screwed into that. Then, a short length of steel cable ending in a plug that was a bit smaller than the seat-tube diameter. Finally, ...


2

The question is better than I first thought. I will explain. If the rear wheel is not centered it is a much more serious business than the front wheel; I mean a millimeter or two. The reason is that the former horizontal position of the cog-set has been used to adjust both the upper and lower derailleur limits and the cable tensioning barrel adjuster ...


2

Buy another lock - the wise advice is to use two anyway: one to secure your bike to something immovable (and one wheel), the other to secure the other wheel. And, given you're not going to be using the quick release so much now, as @mathew recommends, buy some non-QR axles (although that's one more tool to carry around in the event of a puncture). QR are ...


2

http://surlybikes.com/parts/hubs_v1 says "This is a common size so it’s easy to find replacements should the need arise or to swap axles if, for instance, you have a QR axle and want to go solid", so it should be easy enough. Based on the photos, you might want some cone wrenches even though with cartridge bearings there aren't actually cones as such. As the ...


2

If your bearing cones are loose, you should be able to feel it if you have the wheel off the bike, and wiggle the axle (not the quick release 'skewer' that slides through, but the hollow tube that the quick release skewer slides through). With the wheel on the bike, you would also be able to feel it by wiggling the rim side to side (perpendicular to the bike ...


2

Simply for your two points: For a front wheel you can buy or machine a part that will allow you to run a smaller axle on the front than the hub is equipped with. This an adapter to run a 15mm TA hub in 9mm drop outs. The rear is more difficult as hub sizes get wider with larger diameter thru axles. You couldn't make a 12x142 thru axle hub fit in a ...


1

If you're missing a spring from your QR Skewer, you'll be fine. I only have one spring at the moment also and haven't had any issues. As for tightening the nut before locking the QR down, it should be tight, but not too tight so that you don't bend the QR lever. You shouldn't have to break a sweat to close the lever.


1

Your description sounds more like a buckle in the rim. Loose cones can be felt by holding the rim and trying to waggle the wheel side to side. If it does, you have loose cones. The once a rotation comment sounds more like a ding though. Once you've checked your cones aren't loose, try spinning the wheel and see if the rim appears to wobble in relation ...


1

I live in DC, which has a bike theft problem, so I've been through the ringer and can share my experience. As far as the saddle goes, I never had anything particularly desirable, but you need to go the extra mile to be sure you keep your standard gear here. I purchased a short, lightweight cable with a loop at both ends, looped it through the frame, through ...


1

Well, your first defense is to not have anything that looks like it's worth stealing. (Simply a matter of riding the bike enough.) Beyond that, you can have a hardware store make up a lightweight cable about 3-4 feet long with loops crimped on both ends. This can be looped around the front wheel, through the seat frame, and then locked with your regular ...


1

I have a folding bike that, in order to fold completely, needs to have a quick-release seatpost. Unfortunately, in order for it to be comfortable, it also needs to have a fairly nice saddle (Brooks B67). In order to protect my saddle, I use a two-foot-long piece of 1'4" nylon-sheathed steel cable. On one end, I have it permanently fixed into a loop ...



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