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22

Details depend on the ride, but usually organized rides provide things that you'd have to provide yourself. This one appears to provide a lot. This is covered by the catchall term "support", as in a supported ride. The support that everyone enjoys is the food and drink along the way ("The Best Rest Stops") - scroll down on the page you linked, and you'll ...


9

The main hindrance will be actually getting going from a standstill. This kind of thing has been done quite a bit and is called motor-pacing and involves riding a very highly geared (usually fixed-gear) bike behind a fast car with some kind of fairing to reduce wind resistance on the bike. Speeds of well over 100mph have been reached. This kind of bike is ...


9

I haven't done one of those big organized rides yet, but signed up for a local one in May (and a multi-day fundraising ride in September) and have volunteered helping out with some of that kind of ride before. Most basically, those events usually make it easier and let you concentrate on riding. "Heavy bicycle traffic" is also probably a good chance to ...


7

The other answers given here are correct in that there are physical limitations to the size of a single chainring; however, you can get around that limitation by building a "double reduction" gearing system where you sequentially link, say, a 4-to-1 gear ratio with another 4-to-1 gear ratio to get a final ratio of 16-to-1. As noted above, Fred Rompelberg set ...


7

Nothing - you're not missing anything; going out and riding 100 miles on your own is fine, but going out on an organised ride is a different experience. Maybe it's about the camaraderie, following someone else's route, not having to think about the route - just follow the signs or the provided GPX, the provided rest stops, mechanical support, accurate ...


7

I think you answered your own question when you stated "I don't race." I know many in our club who enjoy the Roubaix. I personally prefer riding my steel Soma ES over my carbon race bike for most things, including fast club rides. Don't get me wrong, a twitchy race bike is great in a crit, but the other non-race bikes have had their design optimized for ...


7

This will run in python (only 3.X, not 2.7), a free to install programming language. Simply save the following as a file ending .py - e.g. timetrials.py. Then open IDLE3 (start menu), and open the file (Ctrl+O). Finally, press F5 to start it. import datetime from operator import itemgetter def get_int_input(prompt, min_=0, max_=None): """Get a valid ...


6

Yes, unless they say no. The "Spirit of Enduro" is to include all riders, of all abilities, on all bikes. Since there are guys who can ride crazy fast on a hardtail down a downhill trail, you can certainly ride yours in an Enduro race. However, you might be putting yourself at a disadvantage compared to the pro's or if you are looking to be competitive. ...


6

Yes, no*, yes. Enduro racing is a hybrid sport, but the timed aspects of it are almost all downhill. As such, you're going to want a bike that can handle that the best, which would most likely be a full suspension frame. There aren't any specific rules (yet) against hard tails, although a few events may dictate no hardtails for their race specifically. One ...


6

Don't make any major mechanical changes to your bike the day before the race. If it ain't broke, don't fix it- at least not at the last minute. You will end up kicking yourself for it. Make sure you've had plenty of riding time on your bike's current configuration. Bring tools and tubes, but pack light. Bring a small/medium sized multi tool, a tube, ...


5

Don't enter a category that's too advanced. Eat a lot, but not too much the night before. Get some sleep, this one's hard. Stay out of the way of anyone in a higher category if they're starting after you or lapping you. Don't drink too much during the race, you'll feel sick. But don't skimp either. Expect to get elbowed out of the way a lot for the first ...


5

Welcome from a fellow Kiwi - love that area of the country. It should be a great ride - nearly all down hill and relatively flat, however keep in mind the short winter days make it difficult sticking to training schedules...... Between now an November you have heaps of time to get fit enough for the event. It's 160km for the full event - more than big ...


5

Many first time cross racers use a mountain bike. It makes perfect sense, don't go out and spend $1500+ before you even know whether cyclocross is your cup of tea. Most all races allow mountain bikes, the only type of equipment that's usually forbidden is a fixed gear. A full suspension mountain bike will do just fine as an introductory race vehicle. Your ...


3

Most cyclocross tires are 33-35mm and with tubulars (glued to the rim) many will run very low pressures (20-22 psi). I run 35mm clinchers and get to each race early to pre-ride a lap or two to dial in my pressure, typically will run 28-34 psi depending on how rocky the course is, I don't want to pinch flat, but really like the lower pressure as each lap it ...


3

One option is RaceSplitter. This is an iOS app, costs $35. You will need a suitable iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch to run it on. You can enter a start list in advance. Then during the race, you just have to enter the rider number as they cross the finish line, and it will record their time. You can then publish the results on the website, and export to Excel ...


3

There are a couple of obvious problems: You'll never ever be able to pedal 100:1 with normal wheel sizes, even with a fully-faired bicycle Smallest cogs are eleven teeth iirc, so you'd have to have a 1100-teeth chainring, which is approximately twenty times the size of a 55-teeth chainring, so you'll have clearance problems getting the 1100-teeth chainring ...


3

I once went for a recognition ride on a race track for a competition just a day before the actual event. The track was exactly the same, it was already marked and it did not cross any fence or busy street (it was a pure mountain biking race). Of course, I went to the competition the next day. The biggest difference was purely psychological, but big enough ...


2

Ask yourself a question...if you end up getting a Roubaix, for example, will you buy it and still be hankering after a carbon frame? If that's the case then perhaps it would be better to get the carbon frame now rather than to get a bike, be not entirely satisfied with it, and end up buying a carbon bike anyway in a year or so. I just mention this ...


2

It leaves at lap 5-1/2 laps at the Olympics, but it's more tied to distance. Speed plays a factor in that at the point the pacer leaves the track, they should be going 50 km/hour (or some set speed for the particular race). The pacer will always leave the track after the same distance and for a 400M velodrome, that's 5-1/2 laps. EDIT: looking around the ...


2

Organized rides are great. You get a lot of support in terms of rest stops, mechanical help, and medical assistance. A subset of this is charity rides. These are particularly nice because there are often people along the route cheering for you at various points along the way. On the other hand, riding solo is more challenging and you get the choose your ...


2

The main problem is that the gear ratios of a transmission multiply or divide torque. A 100:1 transmission means that the torque you are generating is being divided by 100. If the resulting torque is less than what is needed to move the bike, then you won't be able to turn the pedals. If you are on a smooth, level road, with well inflated tires, and no ...


2

CX is a blast! It is also a 30 to 55 minute sufferfest of intense aerobic effort where your heart will be exploding out of your chest, your lungs will sear and your legs will be screaming at you. Given this is your first race ever, if this is a USAC sanctioned race and they have a pure category '5' race that is the one you want to ride in as it will just be ...


1

We've used an app for android phones made by Liuto. It was great, easy to learn/use and cheap --only $1.11. Basically, when each rider goes off by start number, you tap their corresponding number on their return and the calculation of their time versus overall elapsed time is complete. Snap!


1

Go and have fun and experience it all, you wont win, you most likely will be lapped and that is ok, they only pull people off course in the pro/elite ranks and even then not always, you'll just finish a lap down. In the races I do, when lapped, I'll end up with a finish time that is shorter than the winner, but I only did 5 laps to their 6. The ...


1

Just a note about tire width, UCI use to allow 35mm width tires, they recently (in the last few years) decreased that to 33mm. Odds are this won't have any influence on the races you are doing, but 34mm use to be a very popular cross size for racing. Now there are leftover 34mm cross tires on sale lots of places because they can't be used in UCI races.


1

I have found a site with a user who appears to have gone to considerable effort to plot and upload many stages of many tours, including Tour De France 2013 and Giro D'Italia 2013 and many others. You can view his list here: http://www.gpsies.com/trackList.do?username=Daniano From my sampling, they appear to be pretty accurate, but, they are not official.



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