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Get a power meter and see what output you are getting at various rpm / loads. There is a big difference of 120rpm at 200w or 600w. This relationship will most likely not be linear. 150 rpm seems much too high, but everyone is different. I personally find great power at 105-120. Timing yourself or using HR can be a measure as well, but power is the only ...


2

Through personal experience, I have found that the higher cadence method will always get me ahead of the group of commuters at the lights. I sometimes see the standing grinders but by the first downstroke of their crank arm, I am already gaining much more acceleration. The grinders are also wobbling all over the place because their centre of mass is much ...


0

I found a discussion of Peter Sagan's SRM data from an early stage in the 2012 Tour De France. Also an article which discusses normal power output for various effort durations. What matters for sprinting isn't their FTP, rather it's their power output over 5 seconds, 1 minute, 2 minutes... For the last 5 seconds a top sprinter will be pushing 22-25 W/kg, ...


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The only way to be sure is to measure. You can use an app such as Strava during the ride, then look at it's analysis later. It will show you how fast you were going at each point, and also gives an approximation of your power output. We don't know what algorithm or assumptions it uses to calculate the power, but since it uses just one algorithm you can ...


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While it's true that a larger chainring will have slightly less friction and thus slightly more efficiently, it's an extremely negligible amount, that you wouldn't be able to feel. More importantly, are your crankarm lengths different on the new crankset than the old? That makes a much bigger difference. For example, if you've went from 175's to 170's, that ...


5

Treating "competitive cyclists" as this single unified group (with three subgrouping) belies some prejudices. Like all walks of life there are a diversity of people, all with different motivations, morals and life experiences. As such there is no single correct answer your various questions. For example: are people in pelotons generally friendly, ...


2

Replace "cycling" in this question with any competitive sport. How should we know if it's right for you? How should we know what the community of cyclists near you is like, or whether or not you'll get along with them? Enter a race. Did you have fun? Enter another one. Or don't. Your call.


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The larger chainring reduces drive chain friction - so is more efficient. This article from cyclingtips lists a study which demonstrated this You can see the effects of this in the peleton where riders like Froome are favouring assymetric rings to give them periods of greater efficiency and reduced torque during pedalling


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Talking about science, there are two factors here: moment of inertia - smaller and lighter cogs in a compact crankset mean smaller moment of inertia, which in turn means that you need smaller force to obtain the same acceleration. In this aspect a compact crankset gives a slight advantage. Note: this parameter is practically insignificant when it comes to ...


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The motor doesn’t have to contribute to upper limit riding. Click the motor on and spend the first half of the race freewheeling at 200W and save your legs. Throw in a change of bike then you can save weight for when you need it. The focus seems to be on GC riders using this technology for direct benefit, but the GC rider could benefit from having a ...


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As far as assisting at race pace - a cadence of 90 or 100 is not a limit for an electric motor designed for it. With the dollars involved in cycling generally, and at elite sports specifically, I do not see any barrier from an electromechanical perspective. Most importantly for an elite rider, the motor can be optimised for a cadence between 85-95 - a very ...



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