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12

Your best bet is to find a good way of attaching it to the rear rack. Anything attached to the main triangle much larger than a bottle is likely to cause interference with your legs. One way you could attach it to the rear rack would be to buy some pannier hardware and make your own pannier for it. Or possibly attach the hardware (zip ties?) to one of the ...


9

I do the supermarket run every week by bicycle - have done for about 7 years Family of four so I more or less fill a full size shopping trolley every time. This is made possible by a Christiana Trailer which is pretty much equivalent in load capacity to a shopping trolley: I have a bike that is now dedicated to the role of towing this beastie (for the ...


9

I think the LBS is partially correct, that bikes with disc brakes aren't generally designed to hold a rack. That said, I think there's a few solutions (other than getting a bike built to have disc brakes and a rack): Get a seat-post (or similar) mounted rack. Downsides: very low weight limit, often not good at holding panniers, and probably prone to ...


8

Most racks have a platform about 3"-4" wide and about 12" long. Usually 20 pounds is well within the weight limits. This means that weight isn't an issue, but keeping the item steady is. Your package needs to be fairly stiff for this to have any hope of working, since the rack platform is so much smaller. A porteur-style large-platform front rack or a ...


7

You should look into getting a folding double kickstand. They're great for loaded bikes. Both legs fold off to the left side, but when you kick it down one leg supports each side so the bike stays perfectly upright.


7

I would recommend getting a second bike for commuting. The Specialized Roubaix is a racing machine. It would also be foolish to leave it locked outside a shop (in case you considered doing that). Most likely you will void the warranty by using clamps on seat stays. To get that low weight, carbon frames are strong only in certain directions and may be ...


6

The front mounting straps on standard luggage racks are meant to be bent as needed to fit the bike. It appears that bending them down just slightly and sliding them back in their slots should produce a nice alignment of the rack.


6

It shouldn't be too different to tapping out anything else, the added difficulty being that you would normally clamp the workpiece in a vice and you don't have that option. I'd take the wheel off and lie the bike down on a bench with scrapwood in place of the axle (try to clamp/screw it in place) to give you something to push against other than the frame. ...


5

Another option is Ortlieb l bought Office pannier which l can recommend give it is waterproof, robust and the way it attaches to the rack works. This is what l use for my company laptop in a padded bag. If you are looking for something tougher try Office 2 bag I did not go for this one based on price and weight, that said it looks like it would offer more ...


5

Your bike looks like it comes equipped with a full-suspension frame, and the suspension mechanism is located where one would usually attach the rack stays. This will make attaching a rear rack extremely difficult, and almost certainly less secure. I don't recommend attaching a rear rack to this bike, particularly not one that will be holding a child seat. ...


5

The Surly Pacer is a good choice. My first real bike was a one, and I used it for commuting, training rides, and a two-week tour in Europe. Even though it wasn't "ideal" for training rides or touring, it worked great for me until I was able to afford more specialized bikes. The Pacer doesn't come with as many rack bosses as you'll want (one advantage of the ...


5

The main issue is the load limits on those racks, and the second one is why those limits exist. The Thule Pack ’n Pedal Tour Rack is claimed to take 25kg, the Topeak seatpost mounted racks will take 9kg. Thule seem to be selling rebadged Freeload gear? I have seen a Thule rack fail with significantly less than 25kg on it, and while being ridden fairly ...


4

In these kind of situations I use the tips that a guru taught me when I was learning the ways of triathlon. In the transition area, where you leave your bike to collect at the end of the swim, you are quite often assigned a spot for your number (otherwise everyone clamours for the ends of rows). So it's about landmarks, "3rd row, lake-side, half way down, ...


4

Aside from the fact that your bike is the only one you'll be able to unlock, the best thing for you to do is park in the same location every day. That can be an invitation to have your bike stolen, however. You can either: Make your bike easily distinguishable from the crowd. Putting something brightly-colored on the bars might help, attaching a safety ...


4

This may not work, but it may not…. Can you can a section of plastic drain pipe. You can get screw on end and fixed ends for drain pipes. Then: Fix the drain pipe to the top of your rack and use a screw on end to keep the Tripod in. Or fit the drain pipe to the back strays and have the Tripod standing partly above your rack. Jubilee clips may be ...


4

Buy an electronic key finder. Attach the keyring part to your bike, when you want to find your bike you press the button on the remote and the keyring beeps and flashes. Range is 40 meters which should easily be enough.


4

Use your phone to take a photo of your bike location, being sure to get some easy to find landmarks in the photo as well. E.g. if you had just taken the photo above and your bike is the front centre one, those two trees should be fairly easy to find again when you come back. If it still takes a while to find (or the search area is very big) and your phone ...


4

stick it inside the pannier bag, protruding if needed. I've carried 4' long tubes of prints that way just fine.


4

Your best bet for weatherproof and crash worthiness is going to be a pelican case. They have a whole series of cases for laptops. http://www.pelican.ca/case_group_search.php?CaseGroup=Laptop I've personally taken a 'hardback' case on a paddling trip and it held up great. Many pelican products also have a warranty against failure as well so if the product ...


4

Since you don't hear the noise when the bike is up on the stand, the problem is probably linked to the load of your weight on the bike (trying to formulate this in a way that doesn't sound like I'm saying you're a problem or you're overweight but it's impossible! haha). Sit on the bike, swing on the saddle to simulate the effect of a bump and have someone ...


4

Based on what I saw on the Giant Bicycle site, it looks like that model has braze-ons for attaching a standard rack - so just about any rack will work. My personal favorite for light use (commuting and short tours) would be the Blackburn EX-1. If you need additional support for heavier loads there is a model with an extra support strut. For the panniers, ...


4

According to the user manual, the Blackburn rack is required. The seat snaps in to the rack, so the old Schwinn rack won't work.


4

The mounting arms are meant to be bent. Bend them as needed to fit your bike. If they can't be made to fit then likely a visit to a local hardware store (especially if staffed by some reasonably clever salesperson) will yield a solution. Or your local bike shop folks may find a suitable bracket in their junk parts box.


4

Assuming you have braze-ons for a rack on your frame, you should be abl to get a rack fairly easily. Racks are made with the basic characteristics of the bike in mind. You need to pay attention to: Wheel size Rack are often specific to either a 26 inch wheel, 700c wheel, or other. Determine which your bike has and purchase accordingly. Tire Clearance ...


4

I recently bought a new rack specifically because my old rack had no good spot to attach a light to. Well, that, and it has a broken weld causing it to rattle. The rack I bought is this one. I got the Bontrager Flare 2, which easily attached to the rack with a single bolt. The light has 3 modes, which are steady, strobe, and random. Random works well if ...


4

29" and 700c rims are the same diameter (iso 622mm). Primarily, the difference in width and length is to accommodate wider MTB frame stays and tires...I'd stick with the TA2026-B.


4

Topeak has a laptop bag called an MTX Office Bag that attaches to the MTX racks and lays flat. It is said to accept a 17" laptop so yours should fit in great and given how thin they are, you should have room for a change of clothes. You might be able to use a padded sleeve. I tried to put my older 15.6" Dell 131L in my Topeak DXP pannier and it fit, but ...



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