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24

They're fine. I live outside of Vancouver so I'm already riding in wet a few days a week some weeks. Just this morning I was coming down the backside of a climb at 70km and they were totally secure. Since the tires are so narrow they don't suffer from hydroplaning. The biggest thing to worry about is painted lines and manhole covers (or other metal covers ...


17

Lightweight polyester or microfiber materials do the job. Pearl Izumi is my favourite. Bike specific rain jackets are a must if you are looking for comfort. Generally they are very thin and have air vents in them. There is no reason to wear heavy rain jackets. Instead, layer up up with a base layer (often merino wool or synthetic thermals) + mid layer + the ...


14

Since autumn is coming here (northern hemisphere), fallen leaves are very slippery.


12

3 great answers here already, but I'll just add: ride more cautiously. You can ride safely in the rain, but you have to remember that the road will be a bit slicker and your brakes will likely be much less effective. Don't corner too hard and brake earlier than normal. When I know a stop is coming up, I usually give the brakes a light squeeze early on to ...


12

Being aware of your weight distribution can help a lot. You want to make sure you are not leaning forward and taking pressure off of the rear tire. You can also help keep your rear tire planted by giving a slight downward twist on the handlebars with your wrists. Kind of the opposite of a bunny hop. As far as braking technique goes, try to be ...


10

I bicycle year round in the Pacific Northwest and follow the mantra: there is no inappropriate weather, only inappropriate clothing. (Well, snow and ice may be inappropriate weather for bicycling) Despite commuting daily, I only purchased dedicated cycling rain gear yesterday -- and only did that for better visibility and more convenient pocket locations. ...


10

It's (almost) completely safe, but you can help yourself: Avoid manhole covers, you'll often wheel spin if you're not careful be wary of coloured road surfaces and lines, London has just ludicrous amounts of painted tarmac (and the new 'cycle superhighways' are some of the worst) take a wee bit of speed off, you'll still get there, but give yourself a ...


9

Rainclothes designed for cycling, preferably in a material that "breathes" (Goretex being the best known, I think). You will still get wet from the inside if you go too fast, but this type of material is way better than "non-breathing" varieties. I have a Gore Bike Wear Path jacket and pants that I am pretty happy with. Rainclothes for biking is essential ...


9

You are getting some good advice here on rain jackets, but the part of the accessory for cycling in rain that I find critical are a good quality overshoes - especially for commuting. There is nothing more annoying for me that arriving to work and have the shoes and socks wet, there is no chance for them to dry completely before the journey back home so you ...


8

No. It absolutely isn't. You know what happens when an umbrella catches the wind. Imagine that on an unstable device doing 30 mph. Even without wind the rain will be blowing in your face most of the time so you'd have to place the umbrella right in front of you for it to offer any kind of effective shielding from the rain. How are you supposed to ...


7

The only way that I've found to get them to stop squeaking is to burn the water off. Big steep hill and stop at the bottom. As for performance, I don't notice any difference in the feel of my BB7's in the wet vs. the dry after a couple seconds of use. Even in rain puddles up to the bottom bracket.


7

From my experience the biggest loss in grip between MTB tires and slicks is on the sand (especially sand on tarmac), mud and snow. On ice there is no grip in either case. On wet surface the slicks are actually better and this makes the border conditions thinner, you either grip well or skid completely.


7

I agree with Daniel R Hicks, my bell also gets a lot dampened in the rain, and this will happen with any bell. But even so, some bell properties might influence: Steel is denser than aluminum, so a similar-sized steel bell could have more mass and ring longer; Bigger rings might also ring longer, because of the relation among size, mass, wall-thickness, ...


7

You can try one of these. I got one at an antique junk shop for 5 bucks. You'll definitely get people's attention.


7

No. Cycling while holding something in your hand is inherently dangerous. You have much less control over the bike and you can only operate one of the brakes. You can buy various contraptions for attaching an umbrella to a bicycle. There's also the Uberhood: However, this got a poor review in The Guardian Bike Blog: once open atop the bike it ...


6

The other answers covered this quite well, but I ca speak from recent personal experience. I got a Bike Friday Tikit with skinny, treadless Kojak tires earlier this year, and I had the same concerns you do -- should I ride in the rain or not? As you can see in the picture, I do ride this bike in the rain and it grips wet pavement as well as the tires on ...


6

Maybe you could strap one of these to your helmet. Then at least your hands are free and it's always pointed in the right direction. It'd probably get torn away in super high wind (hopefully not with your head). I couldn't find a picture but you could even try it with one of those deep, shoulder width, clear umbrellas too. Then your shoulders would be ...


6

Short answer: you won't stay dry. Your best option is to maintain comfortable body temperature. Longer answer: What to wear depends how cold it is, how hard it's raining, and whether your bike is equipped with fenders. In the Pacific Northwe't, we have a lot of light rain and a moderate temperature band. I keep the fenders on year-round (which makes me ...


5

Biking raingear is always a compromise. Do you want to get wet from the rain or from sweat, or a little bit of both? I use a Foxwear jacket and pants, and I stay dry if I go slowly and don't work up a sweat. The material is warm but somewhat wicking and water resistant. In the summer I'll be more likely to change into lycra for the ride and just get wet, ...


5

Here's some technique: Slow down. Allow extra distance to come to a stop. Hang your back end over the saddle, to shift weight toward the rear of your bike. Brake harder on the rear wheel than the front wheel; doing this reduces the risk that your front wheel will lock and cause you to fall.


5

Bike tires are treaded to grab on customers rather than the road. Obviously, different tread patterns will perform differently off road, that is: on earth, mud, gravel, sand, roots.. BUT - contrary to popular belief - on the road, whether it is concrete, tarmac or asphalt, treads will do nothing except offer a slightly slower ride and at the same time, less ...


5

http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/radar/index_e.html Use the moisture radar, it's your best tool to see when the rain is coming and when it's going with great detail. If you take the time to familiarize yourself with it you'll start to get a feel for how different types of rain look on the radar and where it's going to hit.


4

In addition to all of the suggestions already, and slightly off-topic, if you're riding your bike in heavy rain and you're on skinny wheels and tyres be very careful when riding through puddles. Even apparently shallow puddles can conceal fairly deep potholes and a buckled wheel or being thrown off your bike into the path of oncoming traffic could put a ...


4

As you ride in the wet, try to plan your trip around all of the slippery surfaces already mentioned. When you cannot, try to stop turning and braking until clear of the bad stuff, then get back on it. I wanted to comment on surfaces others have mentioned, with "that's the worst" or "this is even worse than that!"...but anything besides clean pavement can ...


4

Slick tires are better in the wet than treaded tires. The best explanation I've seen is here: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html Car tires have tread to stop them aquaplaning in the wet, bike don't get fast enough for their contact foot print for that to matter. As I sometime ride my cross bike with knobby tires on wet road I can assure you they're much ...


3

Recently introduced by 'Altura' (the poor British man's 'Endura') is the 'Pocket Rocket': This jacket is distributed by Zyro and widely available in British bike shops. Visit a stockist and try for size wearing what you expect to be wearing underneath, i.e. more than a T-Shirt. Remember that when buying from the LBS you may pay RRP rather than 'online ...


3

I double bag them (with heavy plastic bags) and then stick them in my supposedly (but not very) waterproof backpack. As long as I don't go swimming like that, they stay dry. :-)


3

The main compartment of most handlebar bags waterproof when closed. Better models have pockets to keep passports dry. There are also plenty of models on the market that have padding for cameras and lenses. The brand most synonymous with waterproofing is Ortlieb. They make handlebar bags and camera kit inserts for them. There are plenty of other makes on the ...


3

In my personal experience, anything you wear while riding that is even moderately water proof will trap heat and sweat and for me, I will end up just as wet if I had ridden with or without the jacket. GoreTex and the like are just riding an edge of being helpful. Short rides, cool temps, perfect. Long rides, doesn't matter, you are going to get wet. From ...



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