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-1

My experience with brake type in the rain is that they are in the following order: Axle brakes (you can have two of them instead of one), no dirt can get to them Reverse axle brakes (you can have only one of them), no dirt can get to them Rim Brakes I have never driven with disc brakes on a bike, but I would suppose they sit between number one and two, ...


4

I've done my motorcycle test and know all about defensive riding techniques - and you apply it no matter what bike you are riding. I ride both rim and disc brake bicycles on my winter training and on my commuter bike. On the winter bike I have swapped out the pads to a softer compound for better braking performance (but not so good for longevity). Even with ...


7

Disc brakes are generally more effective in the rain than rim brakes, but using rim brakes properly in the rain has served people well for many years. You need to feather the brakes to remove the water+crud from the rims. Softer brake pad compounds can also help you brake more easily. Also, having good quality brakes that are well adjusted is always a good ...


3

The delay period you normally experience with caliper brakes is much less noticeable with disc brakes, especially a good quality pair. Even more noticeable is that on much steeper inclines and especially in damp conditions caliper brakes, as I'm sure you've noticed, tend to have an all or nothing attitude when it comes to applying pressure. Disc brakes on ...


1

Yes disc brakes are more effective in rain (and dry). If you should spend the money for a disc brake commuter bike is something for you to decide. In the rain I ride more defensibly.


0

Painted lines aren't always the biggest problem in the wet. The part of the road the cars drive over the most will be all shiny and smooth and filled with smeared otu rubber. These areas will have the least grip in the wet. If you can ride on the rough looking bit you will have a little more grip. Obviously it's a no brainer to avoid man hole covers and ...


0

I ride daily on whatever tyres are fitted to my bike. Rather than worrying whether it's a slick or not your should worry how hard the tyre is especially in the wet. A knackered old (age wise not wear wise) tyre that hasn't been used for ages will be rock had and won't work well in the wet. Some tyres are just a lot softer rubber than others when new. ...


2

Note that riding in the wet is generally more risky than riding in the dry since things are indeed slipperier than in the dry. Relatively innocuous things in the dry become hazardous in the wet regardless of your tire type (such as wet leaves). Wet also is accompanied by oil in many cases on the road, especially if rain hasn't washed the oil from the cars ...


-4

Slicks are unsafe period. Urban environments throw up too many variables, manhole covers, white lines (made from small beads of glass for Pete's sake) copper commemoration plaques, drains, silky smooth concrete ramps/flats that a ground worker has forgotten to etch into and of course tarmac itself. The list probably goes on because it doesn't even have to ...



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