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11

There are bicycles with a crankshaft that runs through the rear axle. The "Tur Meccanica Bi Bici" is such a bicycle: I can't tell from your picture if it's the same bike or not, but it certainly could be.


6

They aren't necessary, but they are a great help to properly aligning your wheel in the dropouts in an efficient manner. If these screws are adjusted correctly, you'll be able to just put your wheel in, pull it all the way back and tighten your axle nuts and your wheel will be arrow straight in the frame. If not, You'll need to manually align your wheel each ...


5

I guess the derailleur hanger or the bit of frame it connects to must be bent. These can be bent back. Of course Sheldon Brown has some advice, but I'd be afraid to do this myself and instead take it to the LBS who will have the tools.


3

To follow up on Tha Riddla's answer: If your freewheel is freewheeling in both directions, in all likelihood it is gummed up inside and the pawls are stuck open. (As a small note: the freewheel is separate from the hub and contains bearings, pawls, springs, and some lubricant.) You can either try to overhaul the freewheel or purchase a new one (they range ...


3

1) It's hard to say what's normal - what sort of riding have you been doing on it, as in, have you been going over a lot of curbs and potholes? The more you bounce on it, the more strain it'll have. Have you hit one particular pothole hard recently? How heavy are you? The heavier you are, the more likely you are to damage the wheel. 2) You should take it ...


2

It's really up to you how often to check your adjustments, but I'd say it's not an "every ride" kind of check, unless you're giving your drivetrain a workout! If there's any damage to the derailleur, hanger, or rear wheel, you may want to start there as well. To specifically address your questions: You should check your limits any time you have a ...


2

I don't think you'll have a problem. Aero spokes are no less strong than regular double butted spokes. I use them for downhill riding and whenever one breaks (due to bad handling, loose spokes or extreme impacts) it is never on the bladed flat area. They'll either break close to the nipple or close to the spoke head. Also note that usually spokes break one ...


2

Most of times the axle is broken when not accurately jumping with bike (the same is with obstacles on road like holes and speed bumps). Wheels with freewheel are more exposed to this because their bearings (i.e. the place where wheel touching the axle) far from the place where the bike touch the wheel, therefor it have more moment to brake the axle. To the ...


2

Wheels eventually do simply wear out, but we're usually talking tens of thousands of kilometers or at least several years for the average user. If it's been less than a year, you shouldn't expect to have to dish out any money for this repair. I believe those wheels typically have a two year warranty. If you bought the wheels at a shop, the shop should ...


1

You've probably permanently deformed the rim by riding it with loose and broken spokes for so long. When you get a wheel, you should check the wheel and make sure the spoke tension is set evenly and the wheel is true. Did you buy the wheels at a bike shop? If so, they should have taken the wheels out of the box (if not custom built) and checked the spoke ...


1

As @ Daniel R Hicks has suggested you need the proper hardware. From the photo it appears you have conventional/automotive nuts. You need flanged nuts or oversized washers with a serrated face or both. The oversized washers are thicker and have a larger overall diameter but the correct size hole for the axle.The dropout is the slotted section of the frame ...


1

Add a spacer and re-dish. Or move some spacers from the non drive side over the the drive side (if they exist) if you don't want to open up the frame (that will require opening up the hub likely). 1mm is not a big deal. You will also have to fiddle with the limits on your derailleur and adjust shifting accordingly. Or get a different cogset with something ...


1

I don't believe these would move without external force but worth checking at every service. No, the upper limit screw should prevent this from happening. Cable tension can be adjusted (most shifters and some RD have barrel adjusters) to optimize shifting between gears. Outer limits are fixed. 3 I can think of: derailleur alignment, is the hanger bent is ...


1

The video indicates the wheel is out of true. It can be a real hassle trying to true the wheel yourself if you don't have proper equipment and the experience to perform the job. I suggest a trip to the local bike shop and allow an expert to save you some frustration. It shouldn't be that expensive because your wheel isn't all that bad. At least it turns and ...


1

It's almost certainly a bent rear axle. I'm willing to guess that you have a freewheel design, where your rear chainrings have the freewheel mechanism integrated. The assembly then screws onto the rear wheel. This design was universally used from the mid-80s back, and is still used on low-end bikes. The design works ok for single-speed bikes, but as you ...


1

In my experience, that sound is caused, not by the hub, but because the tire is rubbing against the brake pads. This can happen if the tire is slightly out of alignment or isn't properly trued, or if the brakes got accidentally bumped while riding (depending on your type of brakes). Try spinning your tire and watching it move between the brake pads, and you ...


1

If you can find nuts with the correct thread (both diameter and thread pitch) but a smaller wrench size, you can replace the ones that are there. But note that the existing nuts probably have a built-in washer, and any replacement should have the built-in washer not too much smaller than what you have. In a pinch you can use regular washerless nuts and a ...


1

As a "home solution" for a lockring wrench, I've seen photos of people taking a large pair of waterpump pliars, ( buy a cheap pair with the proper jaw width ), and then grinding out a "slot" just back of the tips of the jaws so the tips would fit down into the "U" shaped cutouts and serve as a lockring tool to remove the outer ring from the cog.


1

Your body position may be an issue. When the terrein is loose, you need more weight on top of the bike. So as you lean and carve into the corner, you may need to lean the bike, and your body at different angles. Essentially leaning your body less, and shifting weight to still provide downward pressure vs all lateral pressure relying too much on grip and ...


1

I'll take a guess that you didn't keep the bike upright during the flat change, which led to the chain coming off inside the chain case. I had the same thing happen to me on a bakfiets, which also has a fully enclosed chain and an internal rear hub, I have detailed instructions how I recommend removing the wheel of a bakfiets, but I think the "trick" you ...



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