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11

There are bicycles with a crankshaft that runs through the rear axle. The "Tur Meccanica Bi Bici" is such a bicycle: I can't tell from your picture if it's the same bike or not, but it certainly could be.


7

If both bikes have a frame which is set up for it, with the long drop-out on the Thorn pictured below and the EX Box below it, then it would be the work of 5 minutes. Just unscrew (possibly by hand) that big nut on the ex-box, remove the wheel and put it onto the other bike. The only issue to remember is to always shift to the same gear (say, the lowest) ...


7

It sounds like the rear wheel shifted in the frame. Look closely at the axle where it connects to the frame at the dropouts, you may be able to see that it shifted. If you have the tools, loosen the nuts holding the rear wheel in place and you'll be able to recenter the wheel in the frame. As you recenter the wheel also pull back on it to keep tension on ...


6

The outer ring looks like a lock ring. This should help you get it off:


6

They aren't necessary, but they are a great help to properly aligning your wheel in the dropouts in an efficient manner. If these screws are adjusted correctly, you'll be able to just put your wheel in, pull it all the way back and tighten your axle nuts and your wheel will be arrow straight in the frame. If not, You'll need to manually align your wheel each ...


6

First off, the number one cause of broken spokes is not enough tension. When spokes aren't tight enough they load and unload with each revolution of the wheel – basically they are getting bent back and forth each time they go around. Over time they break, just like bending a paperclip. The most likely place for the spokes to break are at the bend at the hub. ...


5

I guess the derailleur hanger or the bit of frame it connects to must be bent. These can be bent back. Of course Sheldon Brown has some advice, but I'd be afraid to do this myself and instead take it to the LBS who will have the tools.


5

Looks like an attaching point for some kind of trailer, maybe a single wheel trailer.


5

Summary: buying just the dust-cap is unlikely, normally you buy new cones and often a new axle, but that's because new cones are cheap. You'd only buy a new hub if something else is damaged (rare). You won't be able to fit sealed bearings. I the picture below from the Park site is the bearing cone and cap. I assume that's the cap you're talking about? ...


4

By far the most likely reason is that you've over tightened the bearings. Did you feel as if you needed 3 hands to get it back together? If not, you did it wrong. :) As usual Sheldon has a pretty good writeup on this, but the basics are easy enough. Put one side back together, tighten it up as best you can. Set the cone on the other side to the correct ...


4

What I'm guessing is happening is that your reaction arm (the thing on the left of the diagram) is not fixed in place. When you brake the shoes of the brake are pushed out from the axle into the shell of the wheel hub. The idea being that the axle is fixed in place and the shoes drag against the shell. If the reaction arm was undone, the friction of the ...


3

1) It's hard to say what's normal - what sort of riding have you been doing on it, as in, have you been going over a lot of curbs and potholes? The more you bounce on it, the more strain it'll have. Have you hit one particular pothole hard recently? How heavy are you? The heavier you are, the more likely you are to damage the wheel. 2) You should take it ...


3

Having converted two 70-something Motobecans, take to your best local shop to figure out what fits your bottom bracket. As Mikes asked Is the issue the French bottom bracket? Or reverse threads? As a last resort, Velo Orange has a bracket that will work. DO get rid go the cottered cranks!


3

Most of times the axle is broken when not accurately jumping with bike (the same is with obstacles on road like holes and speed bumps). Wheels with freewheel are more exposed to this because their bearings (i.e. the place where wheel touching the axle) far from the place where the bike touch the wheel, therefor it have more moment to brake the axle. To the ...


3

Try adjusting the tire pressure you may be to high or to low. If it is low the sidewall can squirm inturns making handling inconsistant, too high and the tire can be so hard it bounces off the surface when hitting any imperfection.


3

To follow up on Tha Riddla's answer: If your freewheel is freewheeling in both directions, in all likelihood it is gummed up inside and the pawls are stuck open. (As a small note: the freewheel is separate from the hub and contains bearings, pawls, springs, and some lubricant.) You can either try to overhaul the freewheel or purchase a new one (they range ...


3

You'll need a freewheel removal tool like the Park FR-6 http://www.parktool.com/product/freewheel-remover-FR-6 You can attach that to the freewheel and then use a wrench to remove the freewheel.


3

Either your cones are coming loose, or the bearings are absolutely fried. I had this same thing happen to me when I was first getting into bikes. The hub was loose, I tightened it, I went for a ride, the hub was loose again. I finally got up the nerve to take the hub apart (yeah, I was pretty n00b back then). The cones and cups were damaged unbelievably. ...


3

super-reliable not too heavy low maintenance not super expensive Any Shimano XT hub M76X - M77X. Also confider the newer T7XX "touring XT" models. Shimano hubs are exclusively (afaik) loose-bearing rather than cartridge hubs, so they're easily serviceable and the balls are available almost everywhere. The XT range should also have decent seals, durable ...


3

Not something I do often enough to worry about, but certainly a 'problem' I also have.... One solutiojn that comes to mind is write "Install" and "Remove" in the side of the handle you can see when installing and removing (My luck would be I would get it wrong way round).


3

By "cosset" you probably mean "cassette". It's a type of rear hub construction and is the norm for modern bikes. Freewheels were used in older bikes. Wheel spacing is the distance between rear dropouts, ie the width of the hub that fit in the rear fork. If you can manage it, the easiest way to answer all the questions by bike shops is to take the frame ...


3

The wheel that finally worked for me is a Mavic A719 with Sapim Strong spokes and a spoke freeze as well as the thickest Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyre they could fit on the wheel. It was built by Mamachari Bikes in Dalston, London. I've been having no problems with it since a few months now.


2

It's really up to you how often to check your adjustments, but I'd say it's not an "every ride" kind of check, unless you're giving your drivetrain a workout! If there's any damage to the derailleur, hanger, or rear wheel, you may want to start there as well. To specifically address your questions: You should check your limits any time you have a ...


2

I don't think you'll have a problem. Aero spokes are no less strong than regular double butted spokes. I use them for downhill riding and whenever one breaks (due to bad handling, loose spokes or extreme impacts) it is never on the bladed flat area. They'll either break close to the nipple or close to the spoke head. Also note that usually spokes break one ...


2

Wheels eventually do simply wear out, but we're usually talking tens of thousands of kilometers or at least several years for the average user. If it's been less than a year, you shouldn't expect to have to dish out any money for this repair. I believe those wheels typically have a two year warranty. If you bought the wheels at a shop, the shop should ...


2

I have replaced probably three or four axles like yours in the last few months. It is fairly easy; the only special tools that you need are usually cone wrenches (very skinny wrenches to hold the cone-nuts in your hub). The axles are cheap (maybe 10 bucks or so online). You will also need a regular 17 or 16mm box wrench. Is your axle a quick release (it is ...


2

Yes. It's possible. Newly laced wheels often have "flat spots" where the rim is out of round. Generally you round and dish the wheel before you start trueing it. It's possible that the wheel has a flat spot that you are feeling. However, there are another possibilities to include bad tyre mounting, improperly secured wheel (axle), bad tyre and ...


2

If it happened in a week, you should take the bike back to the shop you bought the bike from and get them to give you a new wheel (or at least fix the one you have) for free [generally, they should have you take the bike in for a service after ~30 days / 50 miles, whichever comes first, for free]. Any competent bike shop should be able to replace a few ...


2

A warped frame will not cause wobble when the wheel is moved by hand. A warped frame can cause wobble when riding at speeds since the wheel is not straight. However, if the wheel has play (moves side to side without rotating) in the frame, then the hub is not properly adjusted or is damaged. The noise issues could be from any number places and should ...


2

It should be easy to replace your wheel. The wheel is a 26" (this is a standard mountain bike size wheel), and you will also need to match it to the right cassette. from looking at your bike, its likely a 7 or 8 speed cassette. Your local bike shop should be able to tell what size cassette you need based on your rear deraileur, which wasn't stolen. With ...



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