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29

Talked to a guy who had a velomobile at a local charity ride. He said the thing cost $5000. Recumbents, while not as expensive as velomobiles are also quite expensive. Usually over $2000. That could be part of the reason. Sure, with economies of scale, they could be made cheaper, but that's kind of a chicken and an egg problem. Also, even though recumbents ...


25

I switched to a recumbent about 10 years ago, when I was 48. I rented one for a ride and was so impressed with the comfort and speed that I eventually changed over. My current rig has a full fairing and full-length spandex wrap. Arguments: 1 - Cost. I waited over 2 years to buy due to the cost, then started out with a $900 bike (which I soon traded in ...


22

All other things being equal (which admittedly, they never are), a recumbent trike will be slower. It has more frontal area, more rolling resistance, and more weight. I don't have a recumbent bike, but I do have a conventional racing bike and a recumbent trike (a very low-slung tadpole, not a delta). On a frequently-ridden 37-mile loop, my average speed on ...


15

My regular (commuting) bike is an old Cannondale mountain bike with road slicks. It's great for city riding, but it murders my back, crotch, hands, feet, etc. on long trips. So, a couple years ago I bought a Bacchetta Giro 26 recumbent bike specifically for a 2000+ mile ride. I've used it since for rides of longer than a day. So here's my two cents: ...


11

Getting a high safety flag is common on recumbents (and trailers), at least in the US. Photo credit


10

World human powered bike speed records are indeed on recumbent bicycles. But they are very long, flat roads where a rider can move through 60 gears (30 speed chain, and a 3 speed internal hub). They also have larger wind screens. I have ridden both, and just flat cruising the recumbent will be faster, but hills, corners, and stops are the great equalizer. ...


10

If your car doesn't have a trailer hitch on it, you can have one installed and purchase a "trike and bike" rack that mounts in the trailer hitch receiver: Hitch Rider Trike-N-Bikeā„¢ hitch mounted racks transport a trike and bike at the same time. Wheel holder and bike support arm styles are available for the bike carrier position. The rack fits both 1 1/4"...


10

Most are set up with one lever that works two brakes at the same time. There are lots of different styles, such as this one for example. You can see that it has 2 ferrules instead of 1, most commonly used on dual disc brakes. There are other models that differ somewhat visually but the idea is the same. Many Trike levers also have a push button locking ...


9

You could get some Pitlocks or other secured skewers, and then use a standard U-Lock/Folding lock on your rear stays. I'm not sure if Pitlocks fit a recumbant properly or if you want to trust your entire bike to them (rather than just the wheels) but it would probably be OK. Also, you could use a U-Lock between the seat and the front fork (possibly with ...


8

I've commuted in the pacific northwest for two winters, and have equiped my bicycles with snow tires, mudflap extensions, and sewn bright yellow waterproof blankets to cover up my Xtracycle deck. A lot of my inspiration has come from the Winter Riding forum on bikeforums.net. I cannot provide model information, but possibly these some areas to consider: ...


7

Recumbents can be faster. As was previously mentioned, all of the land speed records for human powered vehicles were set with fully faired recumbents (velomobiles). But what will really make the difference is the rider. Consider this rider you've never heard of, Andy Wilkinson. In 1990 he broke the record for fastest bicycle trip from Lands End to John O'...


7

I'm not a pro rider and have never used clips on any bike. Even on your upright bike you train your legs and feet to stay where they're supposed to... if they just relaxed they'd fall off the pedals no matter which bike you're on. I've been riding my recumbent for almost 3 years now and have little interest in riding anything else, though it did take a ...


7

I suspect the biggest reason is that they're very expensive niche machines that, for most people, do not offer enough clear advantages over regular bicycles. A big reason you don't see more recumbents is safety in traffic. If you're on a "normal" bicycle, you're (theoretically) going to be relatively more visible to motor vehicles than if you're lying close ...


7

Have you tried one of these? http://www.treefortbikes.com/product/333222381361/144/Abus-Bordo-85cm-Granit-X.html?gclid=COPRr6H2prQCFQtxQgodRSYA5g Feed it through the wheel, through the chain, and back over your frame. No self respecting thief would take the time to try and untangle it without being caught.


6

Although this should be a given, ride the bike before you buy it. Not for 5 minutes in a parking lot, but for a real, decent ride. Any shop specializing in 'bents will understand that if you are making your first recumbent purchase, it's a leap of faith, and will be accommodating. That is also a reason to buy your recumbent from a specialty shop. Credit for ...


6

I commuted in all weathers for about a year on a recumbent trike in the early '90s. From what I remember: It was a 2 front wheel model with underseat steering. It was very stable, but the only time I did manage to come out of it was in the winter, trying to avoid a van downhill on packed snow. Being only a few inches off the ground it wasn't much of a ...


6

Greenspeed GT3 (Australia), HP Velotechnik Scorpion FX and ICE(UK) make folding tadpole recumbent trikes, which can fit in the back of a reasonably sized car. TriSled (Australia) make one with a break in the frame that serves the same purpose.


6

Right or wrong, I think a lot of people just see recumbents as "dorky". I think its more a perception bias than efficiency.


6

Reason I do not ride a recumbent (based on my uneducated knowledge of them, which is probably ignorant and wrong, but typical.... ): I don't imagine they are very good off road (single track MTBing) Too low to be seen in traffic (Squash factor high) Not agile enough when the traffic does not see you (Increases squash factor) Dorky - (more increases in ...


5

I own a Catrike 700 and also owned a high end upright road bicycle with CF tubular rims, etc. and a Powertap wheel. The Powertap wheel can be mounted on the trike to capture heart rate, wattage, speed, etc. I've ridden the trike over 200 miles and focused on fitting for half that distance (crank length, Q factor, seating position, arm placement, etc.) to ...


5

I've never had a car not see me, who would have seen a bicycle. That said, it's crucial to bike safely and to stay where the cars are looking: in the street, not the gutter or sidewalk. I also use a flag and reflectors. I particularly like reflectors on my body and helmet, since we perceive body motion more easily than machine (straight line) motion. ...


5

Get a really high and visible safety flag. Remember that as a recumbent rider you'll quickly grow a large stomach and beard to cushion you from car impacts.


5

Where abouts in the UK are you? You might want to check out the following places: London Recumbants - http://www.londonrecumbents.co.uk/bikes_we_hire.html DTek - don't have a web site but can be emailed on dtekhpvs@btopenworld.com FutureCycles - futurecycles.co.uk Hope you get sorted.


5

I've had good luck strapping my TerraTrike to the top of a Matrix. We have a roof rack, which makes it easier. But before that I just fed the straps through the doors. The trickiest part is that at highway speeds, there's a lot of stuff that can fly off. (I lost a fender that way.) So my procedure is Put the seat back as far down as possible, to ...


5

Firstly I've seen a variety of trikes on the roof of a fairly wide variety of cars - hmm, I've carried one on the roof of mine along with two recumbent bikes, so its perfectly possible to carry a trike on a car. The challenge - as it has always been with recumbents - is that you may not be able to do so with a single standard piece of kit. From memory wheels ...


5

Comfortable is very subjective. I hate to use a car metaphor, but someone in a trike might find it more like steering a station wagon than a bike when it comes to tight turning. So in one concern, you're replaced an uncomfortable upright posture with a possibly stressful steering style. I would search for recumbent videos and see how many you can find that ...


5

References: Bikehub - Cycling and the Law, Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 1994, Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations 1989 A velomobile or recumbent bike is covered by the same law as regular bicycles: "pedal cycle" means a unicycle, bicycle, tricycle, or cycle having four or more wheels, not being in any case mechanically propelled ...


4

My personal recommendation is to think about wheel base and where you want the steering. I hear that long wheel base is more stable and faster, but I chose short wheel base so I could load it on the bus rack sometimes. Above-seat steering is more common, and I think it's easier to learn, but I chose below-seat steering because it seemed like a more relaxed ...


4

Not really. I would not ride a recumbent for much distance without my feet being clipped in. The obvious way to do this would be with cleats, but there are also special pedal design for recumbents that includes a sling that runs under the heel. Nice thing about a trike is that you never need to clip out. There's the bigger issue that it takes a while to get ...



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