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42

Yes you can ride home with a broken spoke. I'd probably unscrew the spoke from the nipple before doing so, so that it doesn't wobble around and get caught in other bits of the bike. Bike wheels are wonderful things that can easily put up with having a few spokes missing.


27

What could be simpler than remembering that the left-hand pedal has left-hand thread?


25

As a number of other posts have pointed out, your best option is to get yourself a proper repair stand. They are not that expensive, and you will find that you and your friends all get good use out of it. But, if you are determined to do it on the cheap, here are a couple of techniques that worked for me before getting a workstand: Turning the bike upside ...


24

They're designed to take the impact of the fall, once they've done the job they can't be used again and you must buy another. It's not safe to attempt to repair a helmet with glue.


20

I can tell you from experience that your best option is to buy a repair stand. I worked in a shop for a number of years and thought there was no way I could use a consumer grade stand when I left. I purchased park tool PRS-4W at cost before I left the shop and built my own stand from it. The consumer price is now $200 for that so that is obviously not ...


19

I've done a bit of work on old, neglected bikes at our local community bike shop. It's rewarding to bring a forgotten bike back to life. There are usually a lot of things that can be improved, so it's important that you prioritize carefully. Fix the most important things, get riding, and then fix the rest as you go along. You haven't told us much about your ...


19

I volunteer at a community bike shop. We take old donated bikes and fix them up for sale, so I have a lot of experience with this exact dilemma. Here are a few reasons why I will stop working on a bike I am refurbishing: Frame has worse than just surface rust: i.e. extensive pitting and / or holes. Seized parts, especially if they need replacing. Sometimes ...


16

This video shows how to fit a tight tire / rim combination. Although it shows the Marathon Plus tire, it applies to any tire. The crucial point he makes on the video is that the tire ...


16

I'd recommend not taking a chance you'll miss something and take it by your local bike shop. They have a tool that can correctly re-align a bent hanger...this is much more likely then the derailleur being bent. Also, the mechanics have looked at tons of bikes up close and will notice little things that you might miss. Many LBSs will do a post crash check for ...


16

Minimally, you want to be able to tighten all of the bolts on your bike (likely a few hex keys will do this) and an appropriate screwdriver for adjusting derailer & brake pulls. Separate from a multi-tool, a pair of tire levers are the other tool you should carry with you. I would add a chain tool to the above list after being left in a state where I ...


15

A mobile phone. These days, irrespective of where you're riding, what you're riding and over what terrain or distance, there's no excuse for being deliberately out of contact. We can't guarantee being in an area of reception, but if you haven't got a phone you'll never know. Additionally, a huge benefit of smart phones are the apps that can do more than ...


14

You have asked two questions. Is it feasible? Yes. Yes it is. As has already been said, many people rebuild old frames like this with newer parts to create unique rides. I don't know much about xUSSR bicycles, but I would guess that a lot of the parts are copies or near-copies of popular nonUSSR components. To my eye, this looks like a knock-off of ...


14

The exact model is Start Shosse from Kharkiv Bicycle factory (ХВЗ Старт-шоссе) Wikipedia link about factory. This particular bike was a dream of many soviet youngsters, but in reality it is not anything special, as Soviet Olympic team rode on Colnago bikes. It is quite popular trend here (in Latvia, ex USSR member country) to make a fixed gear bike from ...


13

A lot of bicycle repair shops I've been in have metal double hooks hanging on a rope or a light chain from the ceiling such as these: One hook goes under your saddle and the other on your handlebars on either side of the steering support. If you attach them a bit farther apart on the ceiling than the distance between your saddle and handlebars it makes ...


13

I would carry at least one unpatched, pristine tube as a spare. Put the patched ones on the bike or keep for repairs at home. The idea being that when you need it -- in the middle of nowhere, in the dark and pouring rain -- you're guaranteed that the old patches aren't peeling off or weakened and the tube should "just work". Then swap it for a patched ...


12

They work ok - if you are just riding around town, they would probably be fine. If you are on a ride out in the middle of nowhere, I wouldn't count on these. The ones with glue work significantly better, to the point where I wouldn't by the glue-less ones.


12

You will need one special tool: a spoke wrench that fits the size of spokes you have. While a truing stand is great, you can do some basic truing of a bike with rim brake by simply putting the bike on a stand. Spin the wheel slowly and watch the space between the rim and the brake pad. When you have found the center of a an area that is listing to one ...


12

You should also have a survival bag, mobile phone, whistle, torch and small first aid kit as well as a map and compass. Remember it may be you that is broken not your bike!


12

There are four main possibilities, depending on the quality and age of bike. The most likely scenario is that the wheel is a traditional kid's coaster brake wheel - one gear forward, pedal backwards to brake. In that case it's likely that the clutch is slipping inside the hub. A replacement wheel is probably an easy find, even more so than replacement ...


12

Summary: Did you crash it? Replace immediately. Did you drop it hard enough to crack the foam? Replace. Is it from the 1970's? Replace. Is the outside just foam or cloth instead of plastic? Replace. Does it lack a CPSC, ASTM or Snell sticker inside? Replace. Can you not adjust it to fit correctly? Replace!! (source: Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute)


12

Like Daniel Hicks says, they are threaded opposite to each other. This ensures the act of you pedaling is constantly tightening them both. If they were both the usual right hand threads then the left pedal would eventually unscrew and fall off. So, if you're like me and use the right hand rule to constantly assess which direction you should be turning ...


12

Note: this calculation makes many assumptions, so it's only useful in an 'average use case', not some sort of exact measurement. If you find better information, please post it and I'll update the answer. How many pumps you would need to fill up a tire depends on many variables. First, the volume of your inner tube, which can be approximated as a torus ...


11

Here's what I normally bring: Spare tube Tire levers (for changing the tube) Pump (or CO2 inflator) 4, 5, and 6mm allen wrenches (for adjusting/tightening the saddle or seat post during the ride, but also to tighten many other things on the bike that could come loose) To me, for the long rides that I do, everything beyond this basic equipment provides ...


11

Helmet manufacturers recommend replacing helmets after the crash, even if there are no visible cracks, just to be sure. If you see a crack, the helmet cannot do its purpose anymore. You might want to replace the helmet if it is getting old (a few years or so) even if there has been no crash. Remember, most of us are making money with our brain, so we need ...


11

Some things to check and I'm assuming you're running V-brakes: My first guess is that the brake cable inside the brake cable housing is sticking. Some light oil on the cable could help. (WD40 is a solvent, do not use it on cabling or chains and do not use it where you want to maintain lubrication on parts. Look for some light oil like TriFlow, or whatever ...


11

Your best bet is to use mechanical advantage to your benefit. What you want to do is line the wrench up with the opposite crank, so that your hands are as close together as possible, now straddle the frame and force the two apart. Here's an image from Park's description of how to remove a pedal that illustrates it well: The worst position for the wrench ...


11

In the near term it's reasonably safe -- the dent is not sufficiently deep to seriously weaken the tube (though one does need to be concerned about the integrity of the welds on the rest of the bike, given it's been in an accident). In the far term (10s of thousands of miles) there's danger that the tube will fatigue and become weakened at the dent. (The ...


11

There are a lot of question so I will settle on the one in the title. How many years will an current aluminum frame last of a touring bike? Depends: Don't know what aluminum frame Construction is a larger factor than material Don't know the use Use is a larger factor than material Don't know how you are going to care for the bike Care/maintenance is ...


10

A storage stand can make a pretty good repair stand, anything that lets the wheels and pedals rotate. A car rack will also work well.



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