Hot answers tagged

47

Yes you can ride home with a broken spoke. I'd probably unscrew the spoke from the nipple before doing so, so that it doesn't wobble around and get caught in other bits of the bike. Bike wheels are wonderful things that can easily put up with having a few spokes missing.


33

What could be simpler than remembering that the left-hand pedal has left-hand thread?


32

The above video shows how to fit a tight tire / rim combination. Although it shows the Marathon Plus tire, it applies to any tire. The crucial point he makes on the video is that the tire bead doesn't stretch and is the limiting factor in getting the tire on. Thus you need to push the bead into the well of the rim on the ...


27

As a number of other posts have pointed out, your best option is to get yourself a proper repair stand. They are not that expensive, and you will find that you and your friends all get good use out of it. But, if you are determined to do it on the cheap, here are a couple of techniques that worked for me before getting a workstand: Turning the bike upside ...


25

They're designed to take the impact of the fall, once they've done the job they can't be used again and you must buy another. It's not safe to attempt to repair a helmet with glue.


22

I can tell you from experience that your best option is to buy a repair stand. I worked in a shop for a number of years and thought there was no way I could use a consumer grade stand when I left. I purchased park tool PRS-4W at cost before I left the shop and built my own stand from it. The consumer price is now $200 for that so that is obviously not ...


20

I've done a bit of work on old, neglected bikes at our local community bike shop. It's rewarding to bring a forgotten bike back to life. There are usually a lot of things that can be improved, so it's important that you prioritize carefully. Fix the most important things, get riding, and then fix the rest as you go along. You haven't told us much about your ...


20

Minimally, you want to be able to tighten all of the bolts on your bike (likely a few hex keys will do this) and an appropriate screwdriver for adjusting derailer & brake pulls. Separate from a multi-tool, a pair of tire levers are the other tool you should carry with you. I would add a chain tool to the above list after being left in a state where I ...


19

I volunteer at a community bike shop. We take old donated bikes and fix them up for sale, so I have a lot of experience with this exact dilemma. Here are a few reasons why I will stop working on a bike I am refurbishing: Frame has worse than just surface rust: i.e. extensive pitting and / or holes. Seized parts, especially if they need replacing. Sometimes ...


16

In my experience: You only need to apply a drop of glue a bit larger than a pea (about 7mm diameter) per patch; Glue inside eventually dries. If you only have a puncture once a year, most probably the glue remaining from the last puncture would be dry "no matter what". Also, there is an expiration date of around two years, but I think it's two years if you ...


16

The exact model is Start Shosse from Kharkiv Bicycle factory (ХВЗ Старт-шоссе) Wikipedia link about factory. This particular bike was a dream of many soviet youngsters, but in reality it is not anything special, as Soviet Olympic team rode on Colnago bikes. It is quite popular trend here (in Latvia, ex USSR member country) to make a fixed gear bike from ...


16

I'd recommend not taking a chance you'll miss something and take it by your local bike shop. They have a tool that can correctly re-align a bent hanger...this is much more likely then the derailleur being bent. Also, the mechanics have looked at tons of bikes up close and will notice little things that you might miss. Many LBSs will do a post crash check for ...


16

It's doable although it doesn't make sense from a cost perspective. Only do it if you have an emotional investment in the bike or want a fun project that will teach you a lot about bike mechanics. To give you an idea, I bought a 1975 Peugeot UO18 Mixte (a woman's road bike, perhaps similar to your mom's) that had been stored in a barn and turned it into my ...


15

Some things to check and I'm assuming you're running V-brakes: My first guess is that the brake cable inside the brake cable housing is sticking. Some light oil on the cable could help. (WD40 is a solvent, do not use it on cabling or chains and do not use it where you want to maintain lubrication on parts. Look for some light oil like TriFlow, or whatever ...


15

A lot of bicycle repair shops I've been in have metal double hooks hanging on a rope or a light chain from the ceiling such as these: One hook goes under your saddle and the other on your handlebars on either side of the steering support. If you attach them a bit farther apart on the ceiling than the distance between your saddle and handlebars it makes ...


15

The "cement" used in tire tube patch kits vulcanizes the rubber in the patch and of the tube. Which is a chemical process, usually using sulfur, where the rubbers bond and form a stronger bond than just an adhesive would do. Rubber cement is just a gooey adhesive. Usually latex with acetone and other chemicals to make it more pliant. You wouldn't want to ...


14

Here's what I normally bring: Spare tube Tire levers (for changing the tube) Pump (or CO2 inflator) 4, 5, and 6mm allen wrenches (for adjusting/tightening the saddle or seat post during the ride, but also to tighten many other things on the bike that could come loose) To me, for the long rides that I do, everything beyond this basic equipment provides ...


14

You have asked two questions. Is it feasible? Yes. Yes it is. As has already been said, many people rebuild old frames like this with newer parts to create unique rides. I don't know much about xUSSR bicycles, but I would guess that a lot of the parts are copies or near-copies of popular nonUSSR components. To my eye, this looks like a knock-off of ...


14

A mobile phone. These days, irrespective of where you're riding, what you're riding and over what terrain or distance, there's no excuse for being deliberately out of contact. We can't guarantee being in an area of reception, but if you haven't got a phone you'll never know. Additionally, a huge benefit of smart phones are the apps that can do more than ...


13

This type of problem has 5 likely causes, listed in order of elimination. Bent dérailleur hanger, or Bent derailleur cage. (Your derailleur hanger looks straight, but the cage appears slightly twisted in the upper photo. Could be the angle of the shot, though.) Edit: This turned out to be the correct answer, after all. Bent, twisted, or sticky chain link. ...


13

They work ok - if you are just riding around town, they would probably be fine. If you are on a ride out in the middle of nowhere, I wouldn't count on these. The ones with glue work significantly better, to the point where I wouldn't buy the glue-less ones.


13

I would carry at least one unpatched, pristine tube as a spare. Put the patched ones on the bike or keep for repairs at home. The idea being that when you need it -- in the middle of nowhere, in the dark and pouring rain -- you're guaranteed that the old patches aren't peeling off or weakened and the tube should "just work". Then swap it for a patched ...


13

That's a very hard area to patch properly (if its even possible), and I'd recommend putting a new tube in instead of trying to patch it. . I'd also check that the rim tape on the rim is intact and in good condition, cause otherwise if its busted, you're going to get another cut. Also, as pointed out by ChrisH in the comments, rough edges on the rim hole ...


12

In the near term it's reasonably safe -- the dent is not sufficiently deep to seriously weaken the tube (though one does need to be concerned about the integrity of the welds on the rest of the bike, given it's been in an accident). In the far term (10s of thousands of miles) there's danger that the tube will fatigue and become weakened at the dent. (The ...


12

Your best bet is to use mechanical advantage to your benefit. What you want to do is line the wrench up with the opposite crank, so that your hands are as close together as possible, now straddle the frame and force the two apart. Here's an image from Park's description of how to remove a pedal that illustrates it well: The worst position for the wrench ...


12

Lengthening the wrench is your best bet. You don't need anything fancy, find a bit of pipe at your local hardware shop that fits over the wrench. Watch your fingers. While trying to remove a tricky pedal, it gave suddenly and my knuckles hit the teeth of the chain ring. It was a daft and bloody mistake.


12

You will need one special tool: a spoke wrench that fits the size of spokes you have. While a truing stand is great, you can do some basic truing of a bike with rim brake by simply putting the bike on a stand. Spin the wheel slowly and watch the space between the rim and the brake pad. When you have found the center of a an area that is listing to one ...


12

You should also have a survival bag, mobile phone, whistle, torch and small first aid kit as well as a map and compass. Remember it may be you that is broken not your bike!


12

I think that it is definitely worthwhile to patch a tube for many reasons: five patches go for about $5, lower than the price of a single tube (~$7). a patch kit can be taped under the seat whereas a tube must be carried in a bag or pocket (and if in a pocket, remembered). Given the ability to avoid flats almost entirely (e.g. using puncture-resistant ...



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