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1

If the "noodle" doesn't clip in right and seems like it is sliding through the "noodle holder" when you apply the brakes, then you might have messed up the noodle holder when messing about with the boot. There should only be a small gap in the top, just wide enough for the cable to go through. If there is a larger gap, you can try squeezing it either with ...


0

When you release the brake the noodle is probably sliding back a bit because you don't have the rubber boot to hold it in place. So then there is a gap and it clicks when you apply the brake again. Does the noodle slide back when you release the brake? You might be able to fix it by lubing the cable/noodle. I suspect you can go to a bike shop and get a ...


1

The 'black thing' is just a boot to keep dust and dirt out. Cutting it off will not have caused any problems with the brake. Is the noodle (The tube the cable goes though) sitting correctly in the hole on the brake caliper?


2

Pull the tire. Don't just clear it of substantial debris - clear it of all debris. If there is something in there it will work though the cords. If you are into the cord then still do not give up as that is a decent tire. From the inside if you can see damage to the cord then time to get a new tire. While you have it off pull the front and rotate. ...


1

You don't need to be too worried about it. From my own preference in the past, if the tire plies are not exposed, tires with mere surface damages can still last a very long time. Rubber is sturdier than what most people think. I ride a CX on MTB trails and get tires scuffed all the time. Especially if you are not doing anything intense (I assume because ...


5

It does not look to me like the cords are damaged, which means the tire will still have its strength to hold the air pressure of the tube. You have three easy options. Personally I would take the last: Ignore it. It will probably last until the tire has no tread left. The cut itself will bulge a little, so this will be the point of failure of the tire. ...


0

HarryG's answer was spot on, get a custom wheel built up. However, the trend now is to get a wider rim, yes, wider has proven to be more aero dynamic in wind tunnel tests. The real advantage is that with a wider contact patch, the wheel corners better, has less deflection/deformation and handles better. In fact many riders say that wide clinchers mimic ...


1

A propperly applied patch should resist inflating the tube up to 1.5-2 times the nominal diameter. This is useful for testing the quality of the patching work but also to find the tiniest holes that sometimes are harder to spot. As other say, the definitive way to test is to inflate and submerge in water or to inflate and let overnight to see if it holds. ...


1

You should inflate the tube to 1.5 to 2 times the "normal" diameter, in order to develop a modicum of pressure. (Wait until after the patch has "cured" overnight to do this, however.) Then either test in a tub/sink or let it sit overnight again to see if it loses air. (Getting the tube to fold up nicely is not a problem, if it's a Presta. Just squeegee ...


1

My experience is that you can't fully test a patch until you take it up to full pressure. I had a patch that was fine for months at low pressure on the bike. I took the 2.10 up to full pressure to ride on the road and the patch failed. Even if you put it on the bike to test the problem is getting the fresh tube you used back in the seat bag. I only use ...


2

You have the right idea. Inflate the tube to roughly the side it is in the tyre, which will be a much lower pressure than it would be if it was in a tyre. My floor pump doesn't register the pressure of a tube pumped up like this, so I expect it's less than 10psi/1 bar.


6

I do like you do when riding, and I usually save up my tubes with holes and patch a bunch of them all at once. That way I can use a tub of water to both find the holes, and can go back through them after patching and test to see if they are holding air. If I have any doubt after patching a tube, I give it a little time to cure and then I pump it up and hang ...


0

The screw that you are missing there is the B Tension screw. This screw rests on your derailleur hanger on your frame and sets the angle of the derailleur body. Usually, when you put a new derailleur on a bike you use this screw to adjust the distance of the upper pulley (Jockey pulley) on your derailleur up or down from the teeth on your cassette. You want ...


1

There are three possible things that could be causing this: Too little mineral oil remaining in the system, did you top up the brakes after shortening them?. This would create a vacuum in the system and would prevent the lever from returning fully. *--EDIT on reflection I think this is unlikely with a Shimano brake as after oil falls below a certain level ...


0

Since it is a TriCross and will take some pretty large tires it would be nice to keep the option to go to larger diameter so I would not go with a smaller rim. Lots of nice wheelsets out there. An upgraded wheelset does a lot for a bike in my opinion. Do you want to spend $200, $300, $400, ...? There are cyclocoss wheelsets but since you are running ...


1

I researched more on this topic. The short answer is that an aluminium frame can last from a couple of years to 50 years/lifetime. The long answer is: The main factor is fatigue (not counting accidents): "The tendency of a material (metal) to break under repeated cyclic loading at a stress considerably less then the tensile strength in a static test." ...


0

I have used similar products in the past with mixed results. The primary benefit is that is both pump and patch so to speak. But it really doesn't replace a spare tube and portable inflator. It's mostly good for slow leaks. I used to keep a can in my office and used it for those situations where I came out to the bike rack and found a flat tire. If it ...


1

If I used this, would I be able to repair the puncture, and reuse the inner tube afterwards? Main use in bikes: tubeless systems / tubular tyres (= sew-up). First, must remedy the cause of the puncture: glass, rim, spoke, etc. Sorry, not for inner tubes as you ask! Tyre must be rolling to be effective. If valve in place application = particles are very ...


3

Slime is lighter and conveniently pre-applied in the convenience of you own own home/garage. Slime tube sealant As for can the tube be repaired? The PedalPower can says temporary but not exactly sure what that means. As for Sime if it seals a small puncture I just stay with Slime only. If it is a larger puncture it might be too big to repair period. I ...


6

Pro's: May be a quick roadside fix. May be able to fix without removing tyre. May last a long time. May offer protection against a second puncture in the same wheel. Con's: Expensive for a puncture. Bulky and heavy. Only one can per tyre. Wouldn't be suitable for some punctures and would be a waste if you didn't realise this. This fix may work for ...


11

There are a lot of question so I will settle on the one in the title. How many years will an current aluminum frame last of a touring bike? Depends: Don't know what aluminum frame Construction is a larger factor than material Don't know the use Use is a larger factor than material Don't know how you are going to care for the bike Care/maintenance is ...


0

While riding with broken spokes is possible, I have started to keep a pair of spare spokes taped down low on the seat tube mostly out of view. I typically only seems break spokes on the rear wheel and then on side away from the gears. So it's a quick fix to pull out the broken spoke and thread in a spare. The wheel is far truer that with the broken spoke. ...


2

Like many comments, it sounds like it's at least partially related to a change in tire pressure. There's also the external change in tire tread that could contribute to the sound change. If you listen to a large knob tire on a road versus a small knob one, they sound totally different. Your tread might be starting to wear, thus giving a different sound. The ...


2

The protective layer is known as "rim tape". The old tube shouldn't remain within the tire - the only thing inside the rim should be the rim tape and the new tube. You may have different tire pressures than before - have you tried playing with them?



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