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1

The Suntour NEX cranksets are marked as "Interchangable Chainring Design" by Suntour, while the XCM's are marked as "Full Interchangable Chainring Design". This means that you can replace the big ring on a NEX crankset, but the middle and small ring are one piece. So, if you want to replace the middle chainring, you have to buy a whole new crankset (or ...


0

This is the brute force method and may be applied if you desperately need a quick fix. E.g. you're in the middle of nowhere, the wheel won't spin at all and it starts raining... You're planning on replacing the wheel completely, but first want to get home. The technique is much like braking a stick with two hands and a knee: 1. Put your bike upside down. 2. ...


7

Any wobbly wheel with standard spokes can be "trued", so long as there no broken spokes and the rim itself is not bent. It requires the proper size spoke wrench and a "truing stand". For more precise work you would also want a centering gauge, but that's not necessary in simple cases. The "truing stand" can be a fancy $300 affair, an el-cheapo $50 unit, ...


1

If it barely touches the brake pads, then it is not critical, you should be able to ride the bike for a time before taking it to a shop for truing, specially if you ride it only for commuting on paved roads, However, don't let the problem stay forever, as it wil degrade over time and will get harder to fix. I wouldn't recommend riding a bent wheel on a ...


6

There is a down side to not fixing the wheel if it is bent enough to rub the brake. The brake will rub slowing you down. The brake will rub wearing out the brake pad. And causing slight wear to the wheel. The wheel will wobble a bit. If on the front you may notice the bars shaking a bit and hard to ride with no hands. The wheel will take some stress. You ...


12

You are lucky to have V-brakes, because they make repairing the wheel yourself an easy half an hour task. Plus the tool is $2 usually. Spokes pull the rim one way or the other (look at the spokes and their angle from the hub flange to the rim). If you tighten a spoke, it pulls the rim away. So, you 1) tighten your brakes barrel adjuster until they rub ...


0

It looks to me from the condition of the tread like you'll be replacing the tire pretty soon in any event. It might be possible to limp along like this a while longer, using a liner or such (I've used a dollar bill in a pinch for that), but what can happen is eventually the tube will poke through the tire and when that happens it wears quickly or pinches ...


3

If the "noodle" doesn't clip in right and seems like it is sliding through the "noodle holder" when you apply the brakes, then you might have messed up the noodle holder when messing about with the boot. There should only be a small gap in the top, just wide enough for the cable to go through. If there is a larger gap, you can try squeezing it either with ...


0

When you release the brake the noodle is probably sliding back a bit because you don't have the rubber boot to hold it in place. So then there is a gap and it clicks when you apply the brake again. Does the noodle slide back when you release the brake? You might be able to fix it by lubing the cable/noodle. I suspect you can go to a bike shop and get a ...


1

The 'black thing' is just a boot to keep dust and dirt out. Cutting it off will not have caused any problems with the brake. Is the noodle (The tube the cable goes though) sitting correctly in the hole on the brake caliper?


2

Pull the tire. Don't just clear it of substantial debris - clear it of all debris. If there is something in there it will work though the cords. If you are into the cord then still do not give up as that is a decent tire. From the inside if you can see damage to the cord then time to get a new tire. While you have it off pull the front and rotate. ...


1

You don't need to be too worried about it. From my own preference in the past, if the tire plies are not exposed, tires with mere surface damages can still last a very long time. Rubber is sturdier than what most people think. I ride a CX on MTB trails and get tires scuffed all the time. Especially if you are not doing anything intense (I assume because ...


5

It does not look to me like the cords are damaged, which means the tire will still have its strength to hold the air pressure of the tube. You have three easy options. Personally I would take the last: Ignore it. It will probably last until the tire has no tread left. The cut itself will bulge a little, so this will be the point of failure of the tire. ...


2

A propperly applied patch should resist inflating the tube up to 1.5-2 times the nominal diameter. This is useful for testing the quality of the patching work but also to find the tiniest holes that sometimes are harder to spot. As other say, the definitive way to test is to inflate and submerge in water or to inflate and let overnight to see if it holds. ...


2

You should inflate the tube to 1.5 to 2 times the "normal" diameter, in order to develop a modicum of pressure. (Wait until after the patch has "cured" overnight to do this, however.) Then either test in a tub/sink or let it sit overnight again to see if it loses air. (Getting the tube to fold up nicely is not a problem, if it's a Presta. Just squeegee ...


1

My experience is that you can't fully test a patch until you take it up to full pressure. I had a patch that was fine for months at low pressure on the bike. I took the 2.10 up to full pressure to ride on the road and the patch failed. Even if you put it on the bike to test the problem is getting the fresh tube you used back in the seat bag. I only use ...



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