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3

I'd be contacting whereever you got the bike from and raise the question of warranty - given its a brand new bike. Warranty may be void if you attempt to repair it yourself. Also, check whether self-assembly voids the warranty... some have a rider that "bike must be assembled by an authorised dealer" I think Giant has this requirement.


-1

You can take it to a welding shop and they will be able to weld it.


1

You can chase the threads back around with a thread cutting kit and you can also repair the thread with a helicoil kit. If the pedal is in and secure - you might get away with using a threadlock to keep it in place. And of course there is also the option to buy a secondhand replacement from ebay.


3

First thing to check: the left pedal uses a left-handed thread. Was it screwed in correctly? Depending on the amount of damage to the threads, it may be possible to sort-of screw it back in the wrong direction, which will damage it even more.


-1

Look up the model of your crankset online for its size, they rarely write it down. They are generally more or less the same size however, the only thing that changes is the length to the pedal which you will have to find on the crankshafts page. If you can't find any documentation, that's fine, measure the distance from the axle to the center of the point ...


6

The relevant document is Shimano EV-RD-6800-3608A (Jun.-2013-3608A), which gives an exploded view and part numbers for each of the parts of the derailleur. For the Shimano Ultegra RD-6800 SS, you're looking for Shimano Y5XH08000 for the inner plate. (This also applies to many of Shimano's other parts to find replacement pieces) Given that you've invested in ...


4

Bike shops will sell you a replacement. If you are in the UK then for example https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/gear-spares/shimano-ultegra-rd6800-inner-plate-gs-type-y5yc25000/


2

Undeforming a deformed alloy rim can be done, but it takes patience and skill. After a successful treatment the rim may clear the brakes, but braking will be strange. This might be acceptable for a rear wheel, but it wouldn't be O.K. for a front wheel, assuming rim brakes. If you have a nice hub, you can buy a rim, put the two rims together and just move ...


2

Generally you can squirt some liquid lube in the pedal axle and it eventually wicks its way to the bearings on the inside. However this won't do much for bearings on the outside end of the axle. Some pedals can be disassembled for servicing and ball replacement, depends totally on what your pedals look like. We can tell you more if you post a clear sharp ...


0

it looks to me like the cage part of the pedal is pressed together you may be able to remove the pedal and pound the end of the cage part back into the frame of the pedal thee type of connections are held together by distortion of the metal ie widening of the end of the piece to be held by widening by pressure like a rivet so possibly u could re hammer them ...


3

Pictures would help here, but I am 95% sure that you won't be able to do that because there is no race for the caged bearings to ride on. Sealed bearings have the race built in and the frame/headset will have a shoulder that the bearings butts up against, but not a race. The other issue you will run into is that most sealed bearings are press-fit and the ...


2

After a bit of thinking I filed off cogs from the outside. So far so good, hub presents good enegagement at all gears. After few weeks it still runs good. Left is "fixed", right shown for comparison. I fixed (filed) both. Be careful to make them equal shape and that sharp border is not too thin and ortogonal to the side surface


1

Not a full answer, but using an answer block instead of a comment as the bits in the comments can get lost quickly and your question is generating a good number of comments. Read Daniel R. Hicks' comments on good and correct sized spoke wrenches. This is key, you will think they all fit correctly, you want the smallest one that fits or you will strip your ...


1

If your time isn't worth much and you like to tinker (like me), at least take your current fork apart and see if there's anything you could do to improve it's situation. That said, based on your description of it's problems, I think you should buy a new one. And I actually mean new, in this case. Normally it's better to buy a used bike than a new one, but ...


5

Yes you could try truing yourself, but also yes you could "destroy the whole thing"! Well, not destroy it, but end up with a wheel more out of true and maybe some damaged spokes. Out of any repair on a bike this one is one you need to get your head round first and take your time on. Don't let that put you off, just take it slowly and carefully and it should ...


4

Welcome to BB standards hell...... you are about to learn far more than you wanted to about bicycle gearing cranks and chain rings.....The only spec I could find on these was the 1999 model, which used a Shimano BB-UN52, 113mm spindle BB Shell Width 73mm - its pretty common and typical of that era MTB. Your idea of another crank set is a possible ...


13

If your question is, "Can an amateur successfully true a wheel on their first try?", the answer is "Yes". A quick search on the internet reveals plenty of videos explaining the process. Some things to consider: Make sure you fully understand the process before you start Don't use excessive force and take your time Use a spoke wrench Make small ...


4

This one is way easy. Use a pneumatic impact wrench. There is very little torque transmitted. Bruuupppp and its off. I use this a lot with my single speed spin on cassette with the torque from Hades. When I did this manually, I needed a six foot breaker with wheel tied down. Impact hammer is awesome. No vise. No marks on part. I would just hold hub ...



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