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0

I do not have a dahon brand bike, but folder latches are all reasonably similar because they do exactly the same purpose. Latch in closed position, with safety removed. Front of bike is to the right. Latch half-opened. Notice the lever is connected to the latch by a cam mechanism, so as the lever moves the latch moves. You cannot have the latch closed ...


4

What can you afford? If you're not really struggling financially you should replace the tire. If you cannot afford that (or if you need a temporary fix while you're obtaining a new tire) then you need a "boot" inside the tire. A "boot" is some piece of flat material (typically about 5 cm x 5 cm, though size can vary based on tire size) that is flexible ...


-2

No harm in trying to get some more life out of it. You'll need to patch the tube normally, and test it overnight. Then you need to provide something to stop the tube bulging out through the tyre when inflated. Personally I'd put the largest thickest patch you have on the inside of the tyre, but others would use a piece of plastic or something else ...


3

Are you sure you don't have a kick shift/kick back hub in the rear? I had this exact problem after I bought a new, used rear wheel for my town bike. Seemingly at random it would be much harder to pedal, sometimes forcing me to hop off and walk up hills. At other times I'd be able to ride up the same hill! I thought I was going mad, and I too thought ...


2

Why do you want the bike? If you just want to have it in your collection, go for it. If you want to ride that bike fast and long, look for metallographic laboratories in your region. No one knows why the boss was ripped off. There are several methods of non-destructive fractography and they are able to assess the structural integrity far better than you or ...


15

You'll need to very carefully inspect the area around the boss that's been ripped out, as well as your usual second hand frame check. If the bike was ridden after the damage cracks could easily have spread and you might be well on the way to a two piece seat tube. This groove could be the start of a problem, but it's probably just a scar from where the cage ...


1

If the nuts holding wheel to frame are too tight it will do this. Quick release has this issue a lot. Beyond that it sounds like a bearing problem (repack and replace). Spinning wheels while bike is upside down will show which wheel is dragging.


2

It could be time for the rear hub to be overhauled (btw, I love the omafiet style of bike. Good memories). This is not a hard procedure, and you can do it if you take your time. A likely cause is that the grease used to pack the rear hub, and aid in the clutch engagement for drive and stopping, is worn out. I suggest you go to the Park website and take a ...


0

The rear der on that bike will cost you at most $20 US, but if you take what's left of the jockey wheel to your LBS (local bike shop) they should be able to hook you up with a new or used part for less than $5 us.


1

I tend to buy the cheap cables and housing. My experience is that the cost isn't worth the difference for my bikes. Customers, they want to see 'JagWire' on their cables. If you must lube, I'd recommend Rock n' Roll Cable Magic. It's a solvent that carries ptfe/wax. Couple of drops in the cable housing before installing the cable and your good to go. ...


11

The allen is almost certainly metric. Both 2.5mm and 3mm are reasonably close to 7/64 inch. 3mm is a very common size on bikes. If you are going to do any work on a bike you need metric allen wrenches.


2

The little piece is the pivot bushing for the lever shaft. Its' job is to prevent a metal on metal contact point. You can reposition it by loosening the cable clamp at the brake caliper, gently slide the little barrel out far enough to install the bushing. By pulling the cable back every thing should go back in place. It can be helpful to have a pair of ...



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