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2

I ran into this problem after getting my bike back from a basic tune-up. It was especially bad for the 3 largest cogs. After over an hour of investigating and tinkering I discovered this gem from the Shimano Derailleur Installation Manual Some tension pulleys have an arrow on them to indicate the direction of rotation. In such cases, install the pulley ...


0

Mine don't click. I have a red twisty on the bottom of right leg. The settings on mine only seem to take effect around the full mark. I back it off from full to suite.


1

You choose a non-trivial project. Lots of good tips have been given, but I must warn you: restoring an old bike is not a to-do list like I have seen here. It's not like maintaining a new one. There are all sorts of difficulties with old, seized components, that will be a pain to unmount, and which will require a careful evaluation before rebuilding. If you ...


1

It depends on your objective. Are you doing it to save money, or because you want to ride this bike? You can do it, but unless you are attached to the bike there may be a better option. My wife and I got back into riding last year, dusted off our late 70's ten speeds (2 by 5, not 10 at the rear), got a tuneup from the local bike shop including new brake ...


13

It's doable although it doesn't make sense from a cost perspective. Only do it if you have an emotional investment in the bike or want a fun project that will teach you a lot about bike mechanics. To give you an idea, I bought a 1975 Peugeot UO18 Mixte (a woman's road bike, perhaps similar to your mom's) that had been stored in a barn and turned it into my ...


3

This is not really an answer, but it's too long for comments. @Daniel has given some good starting points. For a bike of the vintage, Richard's Bicycle Book by Richard Ballantine would be a good bet, and is available second hand. When you say rusty, do you mean the frame, or wheels, handlebars, brakes, pedals, etc? The way to approach such a project ...


3

You've chosen a non-trivial project. If the bike has been unmaintained since the 70s it's got several things wrong with it from the git-go: The tires are rotten The brake blocks have hardened into concrete The grease in the bearings has dried up Further, finding parts for a bike of this age can be a challenge. But if you really want to learn how to ...


1

I tried all of the above with no luck. Other articles mentioned a blow torch to heat it up. My flame thrower is at the shop, but I did have some sterno.... two minutes later my pedal was free.


2

Get a frame builder to braze in a new dropout. That dropout is finished and dangerous to use, it has bent too far.


0

Yes if you have excess length at the hub end you can use that. Just loosen the clamp on the hub and pull some slack. Then you will need to reclamp at the hub and adjust. If the cable is just plain to short then you will need to get a new cable. Just take the existing to your LBS so they can match the end.


2

Chainring bolts do need to be checked/tightened at regular intervals, it's a part of the maintenance. It it quite possible that they loosened in that 500 miles time and worked their way out; it's surprising that it wasn't more noticeable before it came undone. Some of the early indicators of loose chainring bolts include creaking and a rattle. You can ...


1

Cables have special ends on the brake lever / shifter lever side which you need in order to hook the cable into the lever. A brake cable end for mountain bikes looks like: You can't add these ends to an existing cable. If the cable is broken near the lever, then almost surely the part of the cable with the end is not going to be long enough. Thus, if you ...


0

I have lost a bolt from my a chain ring and have been completely unaware of it for weeks. I had to have it pointed out to me by a mechanic. In retrospect there was a little more rattle than normal. I guess it is possible one could lose two and not know it either. Once two come off there would be more rattling I would guess. The amount would depend on ...


1

As LBS mechanic, I also would recommend to repair - the cost is sufficient. Your bike will be almost as new. So if it's a bike that worth repair (like mikes mentioned), and your tires and derailleurs are in good condition yet, go for it. If you know that you should replace tires or derailleurs soon, better is to buy a new one with all parts new and a ...



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