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0

should I just get down the local shop and have them replace the retainers? Or would it be better to replace the entire headset Replacing the bearings and retainers is cheap and easy (you should be able to do that yourself), you just need to work out what size you want. Since you have all the parts, measure the size of the ring and the bearing diameter ...


0

I would be inclined to replace the headset. It's a simple fix, guaranteed result.


2

It looks to me like you just lost the nut. A stainless steel nut and washer or a stainless steel nylock nut would work best for this application. These options would help prevent the nut from coming loose and falling off again. You could also try using threadlock to help secure the nut as well.


1

You need Leather washers in between the metal fender and frame. a washer and locking nut to secure the fixing bolt. For detailed instructions on metal fender install see the detailed Velo Oranges fender manual.


3

The "bottom bracket" assembly is loose. It may just be that it's a one-piece "cartridge" and is rattling around in the frame, or it may be that the unit is "loose bearings" and the bearing caps need to be adjusted. Or there may have been some sort of failure of the bearings. Regardless, the whole mess will need to be disassembled to a degree, and that ...


0

Looks to me like it is an american to square taper conversion BB, they look like this out of the frame if that is indeed what it is. If that is correct it may just need tightening, also if the BB shell hasn't been damaged you can just get replacement bearings from you LBS if just the bearings are bad. Either option is relatively inexpensive. Tool wise if ...


0

I worked with someone who was a bike designer at cannondale a few years ago. He had told me the frames were designed to be cycle loaded 1,000,000 times before failure. So that means the frame could be loaded to the full design stress one million times before failure. Also welding a cracked frame is a VERY bad idea. The aluminum is heat treated. Welding it ...


2

For the fiddly stuff (screws, cable ends) one of those could work. They are not very durable, but are extremely inexpensive (I got an identical box for under 1EUR). Look in the electronics (soldering equipment, wires, inexpensive speakers, PCB audio amplifiers) kind of stores.


6

I'd be very tempted to make a tool roll. You'll need access to a sewing machine that can handle 2-3 layers of canvas, but even most home machines will do that if you're careful (and buy a canvas needle!) You see them mostly today with sets of ring spanners, made of cheap plastic. But in the older days people would generally make them out of canvas, often ...


2

I have built a number of workstands in the past, and it's very difficult to get something as good as the clamp that comes with a decent bought one. Also, many of the cheap "home" stands have useless clamps that make them not worth the hassle. In my experience Park workshop stands are the best, and the copies of those work just as well. Buy the clamp and bolt ...


6

There are a number of options, and this partly depends on how thorough a kit you need to carry with you. (i.e everything for every job, or a typical mechanic's pit kit) The best traveling tool kit I've found is made by B&W International. Their Bike Buddy case is sold either with or without tools included, and is a carry-on friendly, rolling hard ...


2

I can't imagine a backpack being a good place for tools in the long run. The lack of structure would drive me bonkers- it'd be so easy to keep losing those little bits in all the cloth folds and seams. If you wanted to go this route, I'd look into bags aimed at photographers since they come with lots of little, structured pockets. This is probably the most ...


3

The spokes support the wheel under compressive load. The rim in itself is relatively weak in compression. Of course, losing a spoke means that the remaining spokes have to carry increased load and you risk breaking more spokes or buckling the rim beyond repair. (Note: minor buckles can be removed through "truing" the wheel, a process of adjusting spoke ...


0

If the wheel wobbles slightly, you don't need to replace the spokes just look for one or two that are loose, use a spoke key to tighten the spoke/spokes that are loose. You can spin the wheel holding a piece of chalk near the rim of the wheel and move the chalk in until it rubs on the rim, this will show you where the wheel is out of line it should only be ...


2

You need to replace the spokes. Just one is enough to put the wheel out of true. Once the spokes are replaced you use a spoke key (a special spanner) to tension the spoke nipples to drag the rim back into round. This is a fiddly job which takes time, but is not beyond a home workshop. Once the wheel's rim is running straight your other problems should ...


3

You should take it to your local bike shop and get the wheel dished and trued. It is probably a mix of both those issues. Depending on how bad it is you may need to replace the wheel entirely.


0

Since the chain looked quite worn, I bought a new one and installed it. Funnily enough, the grinding sound/feeling has completely gone away, but now the chain slips on the rear cogs... and can you guess on which cog it slips the most?-- Yep, on the second-smallest one. Judging from this and from previous experiences, I suppose this means that diagnosing all ...


6

It's not clear what is actually bent. From your picture, it is obvious what isn't bent: your fork is perfectly straight from the crown down to the drop outs. Also, the boot which covers the stanchion seems to be quite suggestively aligned with the fork; the bend seems to occur at the top of the boot, just before the head tube. If so, then it is in fact the ...


1

This could conceivably be a cross-chain issue. Hypothesis: when the chain is on the second cog, it extends toward the chain ring at such an angle that there is interference from the teeth of the larger, third cog. This kind of thing can't be diagnosed remotely without detailed pictures at suitable angles showing the chain line, derailleur and cassette ...


1

You should be able to find a second hand fork, with or without the headshok, fairly easily. The Headshok is not too hard to work with, I have an ISO406 fork built to bolt on for my custom touring bike and any framebuilder should be able to make a fork that fits. But I have never really looked at the stock forks to see whether they're designed to be removed ...


2

Aluminium doesn't like bending and rebending (try it with a soda can). I'd make sure that the frame isn't bent and if it isn't, then either get a new fork or an old fork from a donor bike. Your bike shop should help you do either. p.s. The headshock does limit which forks will fit on your bike as it changes the geometry.


6

If you have friction shifters, they don't really care what kind of rear derailleur you put on them -- just that they can pull enough cable to move the rear derailleur from the highest gear to the lowest gear. If you're not concerned with having a matching vintage set, I'd suggest pop picking up something like a Shimano Altus or Acera rear derailleur. ...


3

If you haven't taken the time to yet, you should contact Abus, they are generally pretty proud of their products and stand by their workmanship. I would not be surprised if they replaced the holster all together for you. This is where i would start before trying to repair it yourself.


0

If its the free-hub body you could just try replacing that! It should separate from the wheel with a large allen key (10mm) once you remove the axle and bearings. (price approx €20). If there's extreme play in it you would most likely get the symptoms you describe.


2

I ran into this issue on my bike recently. It could be a bent axle, damage on the inside of the hub, or both. If the axle is true, you will need to replace the hub or a whole new wheel. Good news, a new MTB wheel is relatively cheap, on the order of about $50-60.


5

Generally you'd take the fender off a bike, put it on an anvil, find the right place on the horn of the anvil that matches the radius of the curve, and bang out the ding. Then you'd buff out any scratches or rechrome it. (this anvil's horn is upward curving, you'd want one with a downward curve that matches your fender angle more). You don't need a big ...



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