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3

You are correct, axle to crown is the key measurement for selecting a replacement fork. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to find this measurement. When searching for this information axle to crown can be listed many different ways on user forums such as axle to crown, axle-to-crown, A2C, A to C, ATC etc. This is a good place to start for bigger brands ...


4

Most 120mm forks have a similar axle to crown height and it's more or less 40mm higher than the axle to crown height of typical 80mm fork. There are of course differences between models, but not really enough to matter. Typically hard tail frames are designed around a range of fork sizes. 120mm would be long for an XC frame that came with an 80mm fork. I ...


2

I'm very skeptical that an internal fault in the hub is causing the external mounting of it to loosen up... unless you are experiencing frequent total rear wheel lockup and skidding, maybe. I have a SRAM P5 hub that I built into an old mountain bike myself. Originally I ignored SRAM's torque instructions for the rear axle nuts and just tightened them by ...


4

Phil Wood freehubs come apart with a pair of 5mm hex wrenches. Insert into the axle ands and twist. There are four pawls in the cassette body that engage the steel ratchet ring wedged into the aluminum hub shell. A single spring is coiled around the four pawls. A rebuild kit will replace the pawls and spring. It will not replace the ratchet ring. If ...


5

The manufacturer sells said "vulcanizing solution" in quantities of 25g tubes through 1 gallon cans, so you should be able to buy it in larger quantities. Indeed, a quick search of Amazon yield 8 oz cans (or slightly cheaper), and while I couldn't find it on something well known like Amazon there are other places that sell the 1 gallon quantity. However, as ...


0

I had a similar problem that was ultimately down to excessively worn bearings in the front wheel. I'd tightened them previously but they were beyond their usable life and so there was movement side to side in the wheel hub. Once the wheel was replaced the problem was eradicated. Check the wheels for any side to side movement and tighten accordingly, if ...


2

Usually you can get around this by adjusting the toe-in of the brake pads - http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/cantilever-brake-service. If that fails, you can swap in higher quality pads. Usually this works for even cheap brakes and forks.


4

What did you clean the pads with? If there is residue left on them, this can cause the stuttering that you speak of. The angle of the pads also matters. You should toe them in so that the front edge hits first, to minimize squeaking. Another potential problem is a loose headset (as mentioned by a commentor). Grab your stem in one hand and fork in the other. ...


0

This looks similar. You could whack off the head and hopefully the hose inlet to the pump is the right size. http://www.sears.com/custom-building-products-replacement-pump-hose-20inch/p-SPM6180332701?prdNo=10&blockNo=10&blockType=G10 It is listed as 3/16" hose connector.


9

An unaligned caliper (the unit that sits over the disc) is far more likely than a bent rotor. It's more exposed and susceptible to being knocked. You should first try to realign your disc brake caliper as this will quickly show if it is a rotor straightness or caliper alignment issue. This is a simple job and will only require the correct sized hex wrench. ...


4

If it's just a very short "zing" once every revolution, there's nothing to worry about -- it's pretty normal at least for downhill-oriented bikes to have their discs slightly out of true and bending them back will probably do more damage than good. Otherwise, you should either take the bike to your LBS to get the disc trued or get a truing tool and do it ...



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