New answers tagged

1

If your time isn't worth much and you like to tinker (like me), at least take your current fork apart and see if there's anything you could do to improve it's situation. That said, based on your description of it's problems, I think you should buy a new one. And I actually mean new, in this case. Normally it's better to buy a used bike than a new one, but ...


2

Yes you could try truing yourself, but also yes you could "destroy the whole thing"! Well, not destroy it, but end up with a wheel more out of true and maybe some damaged spokes. Out of any repair on a bike this one is one you need to get your head round first and take your time on. Don't let that put you off, just take it slowly and carefully and it should ...


4

Welcome to BB standards hell...... you are about to learn far more than you wanted to about bicycle gearing cranks and chain rings.....The only spec I could find on these was the 1999 model, which used a Shimano BB-UN52, 113mm spindle BB Shell Width 73mm - its pretty common and typical of that era MTB. Your idea of another crank set is a possible ...


10

If your question is, "Can an amateur successfully true a wheel on their first try?", the answer is "Yes". A quick search on the internet reveals plenty of videos explaining the process. Some things to consider: Make sure you fully understand the process before you start Don't use excessive force and take your time Use a spoke wrench Make small ...


4

This one is way easy. Use a pneumatic impact wrench. There is very little torque transmitted. Bruuupppp and its off. I use this a lot with my single speed spin on cassette with the torque from Hades. When I did this manually, I needed a six foot breaker with wheel tied down. Impact hammer is awesome. No vise. No marks on part. I would just hold hub ...


2

Unless its a super low spoke count wheel (16 or 20) then it should have 32 or 36 spokes. 9 broken ones is totally unrideable, but the remaining spokes should be okay to get the freewheel off with a vise and a freewheel tool. Depending on what killed 9 spokes, the rim may be unusable, and at some point your wallet is better off with a new replacement wheel. ...


0

I'd like to swap the crankset out - it's a Shimano Sora 30/42/52T (FC3303). For example, I have seen a Shimano Ultegra with the same 30/42/52T (FC6503) on Craigslist. Are there any specific details I need to be aware of matching up? The main detail you will have to watch out for (as indicated by Kibbee) is whether the two cranks use the same ...


4

Anything is fixable given time and effort and money. You need to decide first whether the bike fits you, and will do the job. Then decide if its safe - do the brakes work right? Does it stop and go okay? Are there and thick patches of rust? Poking at any suspicious rust with a pen will show how deep it is. Consumables need checking too - depending ...


0

You might succeed with a screw extractor. If you can drill into the head, this will give you purchase. It depends on how hard the bolt head is. I recommend center punching before drilling. Some penetrating oil on the threads might help as well.


1

I expect that when you try to turn the nut you'll rind that the round bolt head is eccentric on the bolt. Side on it looks like the sketch below, and means the bolt won't rotate once it's in the hole. This is quite old school, and they're very easy to manufacture with only fairly basic hand tools. Imagine trying to cut a hexagonal hole into a pedal using ...


-2

That sounds like 3/8 inch. Take the hub to a bike shop, they'll be able to pick out a compatible axle for you.


0

Depends how damaged the fork is. Take it to another LBS for a second opinion. Could be that your pannier rack took most of the impact and the threadded hole is damaged but the fork could be okay. Note there's a fairly good chance your wheel/hub is okay. A second/third opinion will help you decide if the first shop just wants to sell forks. Also ...


3

A quick google suggest this bike is fitted with composite forks. I would follow the shops advice and replace them. In composite forks damage can be more substantial than is immediately obvious and fork failure could produce a horrible crash. If the wait is too long for an exact replacement then there are after market alternatives (such as as exotic carbon ...


0

I'd say get any cheap thumb shifter. Much easier to operate than grip+twist shifter. Click down is very easy. Shift up requires a firm push with the thumb. My daughter when learning to shift gears had a big problem. She's a tough cookie but more delicate hands than average and the twist shifts were just too stiff. You don't notice this with big strong ...


1

It might not be the disc brake. It might be that the hub is seized up from rust. You can check if it is the brake or not by loosening the caliper and spinning the wheel. If it spins freely it is the brake not the hub. If it is the hub you might need to get it regreased. Alternatively it might just be overtightened (although its not likely to tighten by ...


2

I am pretty sure the issue comes from your disc brake. Check the brake pads first : there must be something wrong here because you say it was worse after you removed and put the wheel back. I guess your brakes are hydraulic : sometimes when you store your bike in a humid place for a long time, the braking fluid will kind of "dilate", resulting in less space ...


2

A loose crank arm can damage both the bottom bracket and the crank arms. In your case, since you've run the crank arm til it fell off the bike, it is likely you ruined the bottom bracket. If your crank arm is loose, immediately stop and tighten it. You will need to likely get a new bottom bracket and possibly yet another new crank arm. Replacing a bottom ...


7

I think this working is highly dependent on where you live, and I don't think it would work in most places. You need enough people in the market who would use this service (which probably don't exist in most places). And people need to be willing to pay the premium you need to sustain to have this type of business. Bike shops aren't exactly very profitable ...


10

You don't need such a repair service. There is a different, more practical solution: a loan bike. In The Netherlands, most bicycles are used by commuters, so expediting wouldn't work. However, there are also many places that rent bicycles. A good bike shop can simply have a couple of dozen bicycles on hand that they then loan out to a (regular) customer, ...


4

Earlier this week my day was thoroughly disrupted by the stem valve in my rear tire tearing out of the tube. (It's a belt-drive bike with disc brakes, so the rear tire assemblage is more complex than I'm quite comfortable fixing myself.) I'd have called such a business in a shot. Ditto if that back tire ever goes while I'm in the middle of nowhere on a ...


0

should I just get down the local shop and have them replace the retainers? Or would it be better to replace the entire headset Replacing the bearings and retainers is cheap and easy (you should be able to do that yourself), you just need to work out what size you want. Since you have all the parts, measure the size of the ring and the bearing diameter ...


0

I would be inclined to replace the headset. It's a simple fix, guaranteed result.


2

It looks to me like you just lost the nut. A stainless steel nut and washer or a stainless steel nylock nut would work best for this application. These options would help prevent the nut from coming loose and falling off again. You could also try using threadlock to help secure the nut as well.


2

You need Leather washers in between the metal fender and frame. a washer and locking nut to secure the fixing bolt. For detailed instructions on metal fender install see the detailed Velo Oranges fender manual.



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