New answers tagged

1

If there is a strong resistance. My guess is that you have a limit screw preventing the fron derailleur shifting to bigger chainring. Check limit screw Check if front derailleur can move freely (unscrew both limit screw and pull the cable to see if front derailleur move). Sometimes front derailleur corrodes to the point that it cannot be moved.


0

Difficult and vintage are relative terms, and I think that relativity can vary depending upon the mechanic and LBS in question. Old and vintage may at times be interchangeable, but vintage generally translates as not only old but also good or special or rare or loved. There are shops that regard bikes from the 90s as vintage, and still others that regard ...


1

My brifters date from 1997 and are "early tech" When I got it, they shifted poorly, with a really annoying habit of changing down and then not changing back up. I blasted them with brake cleaner and various oils and fluids which helped, but the only fix was a teardown and soak the guts of it in petrol for a day, to soften the old hardened grease. Now it ...


1

The reliability depends on the quality of the brifter itself but, for most brifters, all you need to maintain, adjust, and them and keep them in good working condition is a hex key set, some spray degreaser, and a high quality grease. I use mostly sram brifters and they just work when they are set up right. To keep them in good working order I remove the ...


4

There was a questionnaire on Bikeforums on this topic and here you can see the results: Brifters - how reliable are they? 39 people gave their votes and obviously for most people brifters did not break at all. The second question is about working optimally. To be honest I am yet to see a brifter which does not work optimally. Brifters have very little to no ...


2

This is an opinion question. But this is my take on it. I have bar-end shifters on our tandem, brifters on my race and commuter bikes, and downtube shifters on a training bike. They are all extremely reliable. The bar-end shifters that I have are indexed, but they can be adjusted to run in a 'friction mode'. That is handy for swapping rear-wheels ...


2

Not trying to be over simplistic but did you try your local hardware store? If I'm understanding right you've lost a bolt to a nut and bolt combination. Take what you do have and go to the hardware store to replace. Might be a bit shiny but it can get you functionality. FYI, this isn't a "I told you so" but is meant as help. Consider getting an old dozen ...


8

No. Older bicycles are no harder to work on than modern bicycles provided you have specialized knowledge regarding older standards, possibly specialized tools and the ability to obtain parts designed for older standards. Generally a bicycle built now will likely conform to a set of standards that are common and in place now. If you bought a bike today, ...


3

You mention a number of manufacturers there, but to be honest it's not so much the bike manufacturers you need to think about (there is no "standard frame"), its the manufacturers of the components - the groupset - which fit onto the frame. The key players there are Shimano, SRAM and (in some places, for road bikes only), Campagnolo. These companies are ...


1

Quick answer: No. All modern bike, with modern components (not cheap bike!) is adequately easy to adjust and replace. They are (mostly) standardised now. Working on bikes has its own merits, as long as you can find parts. I guess it will be expensive trying to repair something that is already depreciated, in term of technology and manufacturing. Whether a ...


2

I guess that's an adjustment nut of rod brake. Not trying to recommend a product but if you search for rod brake nut, and look for something with this similar shape, you will find them being sold on-line (still). http://www.highnelly.ie/brake-parts/rod-brake-lock-nut.html


0

If it is a cruiser bike it might be the laid-back angle that makes it feel a bit more difficult to pedal as you generally push bigger gears with such bikes rather than spin due to the position of the seat in relation to the cranks.


4

Start with the easier things before busting out the spanners! Check the bike over. Low pressure tyres are very hard to ride, so add air with a pump. Look for anything wrong, that's anything rubbing or otherwise out of line. Walk the bike around and make sure it coasts okay. Rotate the pedal crank while lifting the rear wheel off the ground and make sure it ...


0

Edit: I agree with Criggie about the check list first, I just assume people check for the obvious, I probably shouldn't assume that though. What can you do to fix it: Unless you are happy getting your hands dirty and doing something like in the youtube link below then taking your bike to a bike shop would be the best option. ...


1

Outside the box possibilities. Is there something that stops you riding your bike in the winter? Yes winter is colder and wetter, and depending on your location there may be snow. Perhaps a snow bike would be more year-round.... that's a rigid MTB with studded tyres for winter and commuter tyres for summer. Second option is to look at hanging your ...


-1

Just a 5mm allen will get you a lot if you have quick release wheels. Just drop seat and spin the bars. Lace the pedals between the spokes of the removed wheels. In a dorm closet you can hang socks on the bar. You just need to get it against the wall. For college you might as well get a kit to also do basic maintenance. Essential Tool Kit ESSENTIAL TOOL ...


1

I take a single multitool when I travel to disassemble/reassemble my bike. I have an older model crank brothers tool that they don't make anymore, but something similar is available here. I run pedals that can be taken on and off with a 8mm hex, so I don't need a pedal wrench. Without a complete breakdown of your bike and all it's parts, one would be ...


6

You want to remove the wheels, seat post (you may be able to get away with setting this all the way at the bottom or doing nothing depending on how you're storing it), handlebars and pedals. If you can go to your local bike shop and get a (cardboard) box for shipping bikes, the bike should pack in nicely for storage. This video shows you the steps in a nice ...


3

Set of Allen (hex) key: usually 4,5 and 6 mm would do the job. You can use these Allen key for disassembling handlebar, stem, seatpost, and most pedals Adjustable wrench or (usually) 15 mm wrench: (check if needed) in order to remove the pedal. You could usually remove the pedal with 8 mm Allen key (sometimes could be 5 mm, 6 mm, or 10 mm). Check if there ...


5

You will want: hex/allen key set (check standard vs. metric) pedal wrench ratchet set or box wrenches (crescent wrench as last alternative) gardening gloves to keep your hands clean Ensure that you do not strip the fasteners as metric/standard can be a very close fit sometimes. Save some old t-shirts or towels to wrap around the drive-train to keep it ...


3

The recommendation of Calvin Jones of Park Tool for a trail/road-side conversion to a single speed is: If you have multiple chain rings, put the chain on the 2nd-to-largest chain ring. I.e. if you have two chain rings, this will be your smallest. For the cassette, put the chain in a straight line back from the chosen chain ring. If in doubt, use the ...



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