Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Getting the spoke tensions high & even is on of the most important things – balanced tension makes the wheel stable, high tension keeps the loads on the wheel structure fairly constant as it rolls which helps to prevent spoke breakage. You can get reasonably close by pitch and ear (pluck the spokes and listen to the pitch). If you have a ear that doesn't ...


0

Carel misses the point that there is no front derailleur so it's definitely not a limit screw issue on the front derailleur! It's also highly unlikely the chainring is worn from just 3,000km. It's also unlikely to be the chain given that you changed it not that long ago. Finally, limit screws very rarely come out of adjustment on their own. I think people ...


1

I have a "Bicycle Diary", just a plain notebook where I keep a log with every maintenance task done (parts changed, chain lubing, greasing, ...), rides (where, when, how long, ...) and general notes. I also made a chart with entries for each component (chain, cassette, pads, ...) and the odometer lecture when I changed it (so I can know when a replacement is ...


1

Bicycle maintenance is more generic than car maintenance due to design. Bikes don't often have any custom parts besides the frame. All the rest are usually off the self components from different vendors. So, there is not much point to have maintenance schedule for a particular bike. Besides, bikes usually don't come equipped by bike computers by default so ...


2

Most bikes don't really come with much of a guide or instructions. Buy a Park Tool Big Blue Book of Bicycle Repair or one of the Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance (or Mountain Bike Maintenance) and you'll have some pretty comprehensive guides on how to maintain, fix, or replace just about anything on your bike. Specialty tools may apply for ...


6

Maintenance on a bike is much less than maintenance on a car. It is a much, much simpler machine with far fewer parts. As such there isn't such a thing as a maintenance schedule or service book. That said, there are a few things you should do; Tyres Visual inspection and pressure check once per week. Chain The chain needs to be cleaned and lubricated. The ...


-1

As Carel says - there are limit screws to prevent the chain from going out of range. It is important to set those limits correctly or the chain will fall off. Did the LBS not check the limit settings? Even with a new chain and new correctly set derailleur, the chain can and will jump off the sprocket if the limit screws are not set properly. In the ...


0

Even though I am commenting long after the this question is already answered, I think it is worthwhile to point out some safety information. The pins of modern 9 speed and up chains are mushroomed at the ends to prevent prying the chain apart with lateral force when changing gears. Because of this, not only should pins no longer be re-used, but the ...


1

Your chain or, less likely, your chainring (what you call front cog), could be worn. That would be a little early and could indicate less than optimal maintenance (keeping things clean and lubricated), but wear depends highly on circumstances (rain, mud, velocity). It's simple to measure chain wear: they lengthen in use. Just measure the length of 10 ...


2

Without the shifter's resistance, the rear derailleur pulls towards the smallest cog (highest gear). This would also happen, e.g., when the shift cable snaps. (Rarer 'inverse' derailleurs would pull towards the largest cog.) To test the rear derailleur, pull the shift cable with your hand while turning the crank; if the derailleur moves and pushes the chain ...


3

The Ergopower shifters have a part called G spring that eventually wears out. The symptoms are inaccurate shifting and less sharp clicks, just as you are experiencing. The part is still available, not expensive and relatively easy to change. I would not replace the shifters with Xenon, as it is generally much lower quality and doesn't allow downshifting ...


2

My suggestion would be a trip to your LBS (with the axle in hand) or a hardware store with organized, open bins. It's unlikely you'll be able to find the specifications for a 50 year old hub anywhere readily available. Even with newer hubs, such information isn't always available. If your LBS can't help you I'd recommend taking the axle with you into the ...


0

It could be a tiny amount of movement between the cassette and the freehub. Try putting some grease on the freehub splines, and (more importantly) make sure the cassette lockring is tightened to the correct torque. Check if the noise occurs on all cogs of the cassette, or just on a few cogs. I had a case where there was a crunching noise only on the 3 ...


0

OK, the question is kind of vague (as others have pointed out) and it would help if you could say more about the (apparent) source and timing of the noises, but I just wanted to add a couple of thoughts: I chased what I thought was a bottom bracket / crank arm clunk for quite a while before I noticed that my saddle wasn't clamped well. I'd moved it back as ...


0

well, the noise is mostly only when pedaling harder than normal...BB not loose, pedals new, derailleur checked at bike shop, new chain, chain smooth over gears...I bike commute though do not pile up that many miles...previous owner I doubt rode much...maybe need to service BB bearings? Thanks for tips! beatles



Top 50 recent answers are included