Hot answers tagged

15

From personal experience, I'd say a larger-than-usual hole in the tire could have these undesireable side-effects: The tube might get a bit exposed, and the day-to-day rolling over the hole might wear it down until the tire eventually flats out. Chemical aggresion from road grime or mud could also be involved. The fabric of the tire might get damaged to ...


14

Generally, if you are using an inner tube in the tire, you should replace the tire if there is more than a 2 millimeter cut in the tire casing. Not in the rubber, mind, but it the threaded cloth casing that your rubber bits are laid on to. I personally err on the side of replacement rather than risking a serious injury from a blow out at a bad time, so I ...


10

Generally, you repair tubes, not tires. From your last sentence, it sounds like you are indeed talking about the tire. As it is with the tube, the real answer is "Size Matters". In this case, both the size of the hole and the size (okay, type) of the tire. If I was looking at damage to a road tire "slick", the hole you describe would likely having me change ...


9

When you remove all the thorns very carefully you could keep using the tire. Unfortunately this might be some hassle with 30+ thorns and you can not be a 100% sure that you really have removed all of them. Also some may have broken off in a way that you see the remains from neither inside nor outside but the remains may be pushed further inside after some ...


7

Always BEST to just replace the tire, but... I have ridden my tires with a gash of an inch or longer. I couldnt recommend it to everyone (legal issues) but I do it all the time. I take an old tube, cut about a 2 inch section out of it (so you have a 2 inch long tube, not just a patch), wrap duct tape around it then duct tape that onto the inside of the tire. ...


6

If you search cantilever brake parts you should find what you need. They are sometimes referred to as threadless post brake pads.


6

Can I use a 9 speed shifter with a 7 speed drivetrain, with good shifting and without needing complex adaptations? Kinda, maybe, sort of... its complicated You could use a Shimano 7 speed derailleur with a 9 speed shifter, if you also used a wheel with a 9 speed cog. The 7 and 9 speed Shimano derailleurs use the same derailleur ratio of 1.7 (amount of ...


6

If you have friction shifters, they don't really care what kind of rear derailleur you put on them -- just that they can pull enough cable to move the rear derailleur from the highest gear to the lowest gear. If you're not concerned with having a matching vintage set, I'd suggest pop picking up something like a Shimano Altus or Acera rear derailleur. ...


5

I had the same problem (48x38x28 chainset). It turned out that MF-TZ21 is actually not a 'cassette', but a 'freewheel'. Your options for that are very limited: In the UK, Raleigh is distributing a 7 speed 13-24T model for less than 10 quid. SunRace is still producing 7 speed freewheels, but the closed-spaced 12-?? model wasn't distributed in the UK: Check ...


5

The 14/28 is the number of teeth on the smallest and largest cog of the cassette. From your description you want to make at least the second number smaller, possibly the first number. As long as your replacement says that it's Shimano compatible (and 7 speed), you should be fine. Count the teeth on the cog that has the most teeth that you actually use......


5

I don't think any manufacturer will give you any warranty in case of "abuse" of its products – and it surely could be considered abusive to have a crash with their clothing, even if it was sold as mountainbike clothing. There may be some exception with protective gear, but even then the manufacturer might argue that it was designed to get damaged or ...


5

You can use either the Sora or 105 shifters (all the cable pulls will match). Sora 9 speed has the proper ergonomics (instead of the silly button that it used to use on 8 speed), so its a good shifter. As for if you will notice any performance difference, both should shift fine (if the 105's are indeed in good condition) [if you're racing, maybe you'll ...


5

You'll probably be fine if you buy the wheel from the new version of what you have now. Probably. Shimano especially have a reputation for tweaking things just enough that last years parts don't fit. The real issue is the axle diameter at the centre of the jockey wheel. If that matches the rest is likely to be fine. Unfortunately there's no real way to work ...


5

The ST EF-51's have a little switch in the back of them to switch between V-brake and cantilever. I found them too low quality to use reliably though. You have several options: Go to 8 speed or more and pick up some Alivio shifters. This is what I did on a 7 speed bike, and this is what I'd recommend. Microshift makes some 7 speed shifters that are ...


5

I'd not take this "statement from authority" as an absolute truth. Ask them to prove its impact damage. Depending on your location, there may be ombudsman services or small claims courts where you can pursue them for "failure to honour warranty contract" If the frame is replaced, they will keep the old one and you look after your new one. If the claim ...


4

To directly answer your question, yes, the Crank Bros Premium Cleat is the one you want. Per their webiste - compatibility: eggbeater, candy, smarty, acid, mallet ( http://www.crankbrothers.com/accessories_premium_cleat.php ) Some good FAQ on these from Crank Bros: http://www.crankbrothers.com/support/faq_candy.php


4

Just to enrich this answer, there are the two systems nowadays for mounting the brakes on the fork and frame; these are IS or postmount: http://www.pricepoint.com/TechPages/TECH_Page_Disk_Mount_Types.htm Normally you can find adapters to use one or the other. Regarding the disk-hub mounting, there are also two options, - 6-bolt (the name is self-...


4

Rear derailleurs don't care whats up in front and vice versa. Rear derailleurs don't care about the number of cogs in the back, but front derailleurs care about the number of chain rings (you can get a triple derailleur to play nice with a double chainring, but you should probably get the right part to begin with). Speeds are mostly marketing though, as ...


4

This is a very doable project. However, the cost benefit will vary. You need to be very sure of what parts will be reusable. If you are going to pay your local shop to do the work then as @Eric Smekens has said, sell the old one and look for a bike that fits. If you are planning on doing it yourself it is an excellent way to learn how your bike works and ...


4

Before starting, your fork looks pretty nice. Are you sure you can't send it to FOX and rebuild it? Why do you say it is ruined? About the fork size, please check the cube FAQ: CAN I INSTALL FORKS WITH MORE TRAVEL AS PROVIDED IN THE STANDARD EQUIPMENT? NO. The installation of a fork with more travel will void the warranty. The bike geometry will be ...


4

Depends how they've been stored. If they were inside a garage or otherwise dry, then that's a lot less work. If they were outside or damp, everything will be that much closer to EOL. Gear changes and brakes: if there's been moisture in the cables then they can suffer but housings and inner wires can be replaced. Tyres and tubes can degrade in heat. Oils ...


4

You need to purchase a SRAM 10 speed rear derailleur to ensure compatibility with your shifters. SRAM previously made a wide range of derailleurs for X5, X7, X9, X0 and XX but have limited their range to GX and X0 following the market shift to 11 speed drive trains. GX has replaced the old X7 and X9 price points. Your options are limited as SRAM and ...


4

Generally road caliper and cantilever brakes are not compatible with "V" brakes levers. You have a few basic options. Find a single shifter and reuse your brake lever, find an integrated shifter for canti brakes,( likely a rare find), up grade your brake to a "V" brake. Your local shop may help with some used parts. In my area used brakes go for around $10. ...


4

You can try it, but don't expect perfection. The width of a 7-speed chain is greater than the width of a 9-speed chain, therefore the component sizes, and the distance you need to shift, are different, even if only slightly. Whether this is enough to spoil your ride, only you can judge. A shop or a manufacturer might be somewhat more definite in their answer,...


3

Since it sounds like you have mechanical disc brakes (Avid BB5 or Tektro Novela not hydraulic) then any direct-pull or V-Brake lever should work fine with your cable. Searching for 'V-Brake levers' or 'mechanical disc brake levers' should provide plenty of responses. For example, if you look at the spec page for the Avid FR-5 lever, you will see that they ...


3

Frame clearance can be a problem, especially if the mud is sticky and the tire too close - it can clog up quite badly if you go too wide. If you have V brakes, these can also, however my experience has been worst case is new brake pads. 29" Mountain bike tires are 700C. (As Always - http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html has the answer), so you now have ...


3

I've never heard of repairing a bike tire. Maybe if it were tubeless you could plug it, just as you do on your car. But if not...I guess if you're just cruising around town give it a shot. If you are pushing the limits on this thing, buy a new tire. Worst case you blow out and slide under a truck (or into a tree maybe if we're talking mountain biking?). Best ...


3

Remove cables. Remove bar tape. Roll back lever covers to reveal clamp bolts Loosen bolts and slide off bars. Follow instructions included with the new levers (these should in effect be a well written reversal of steps 1-4.)


3

Lets say you wish to replace a crank similar to yours and you cannot find the exact same crank as the one you have. BIG PICTURE: Unless you can find the exact same crank as yours, you'll need to purchase both a crank and matching bottom bracket. A guide for choosing a crank is listed below Measure the length of the Bottom Bracket shell. If it is 68mm or ...


3

Well, going SRAM means new shifters and new derailleurs (and while you're at it, you may as well install all new cable housings and cables). Depending on your hub, you may need to get a new hub (or more likely, a new rear wheel) to fit a 9/10 speed cassette that the current x7 group uses -- however if you have an 8/9/10 speed freehub already, you should be ...



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