Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

I volunteer at a community bike shop. We take old donated bikes and fix them up for sale, so I have a lot of experience with this exact dilemma. Here are a few reasons why I will stop working on a bike I am refurbishing: Frame has worse than just surface rust: i.e. extensive pitting and / or holes. Seized parts, especially if they need replacing. Sometimes ...


14

The exact model is Start Shosse from Kharkiv Bicycle factory (ХВЗ Старт-шоссе) Wikipedia link about factory. This particular bike was a dream of many soviet youngsters, but in reality it is not anything special, as Soviet Olympic team rode on Colnago bikes. It is quite popular trend here (in Latvia, ex USSR member country) to make a fixed gear bike from ...


14

You have asked two questions. Is it feasible? Yes. Yes it is. As has already been said, many people rebuild old frames like this with newer parts to create unique rides. I don't know much about xUSSR bicycles, but I would guess that a lot of the parts are copies or near-copies of popular nonUSSR components. To my eye, this looks like a knock-off of ...


14

Restoring the bike is a great way understand the bike. My history is similar to yours. Gave up bikes around 10. Wife want to me ride with her. I got a top of the line bike on CG for peanuts. of course, it was top of the line around the 90s :) cleaning start by REALLY cleaning the bike. simple green and brushes. don't be afraid to wet the bike. just avoid ...


6

There is, unfortunately, a degree of "planned obsolescence" with bikes. For better or for worse (I haven't figured out which yet), bike technology (which used to move at glacial speed) now turns over every 5 years or so, and once you get about 3 generations back (ca 15 years) parts become much harder to find. In terms of condition, it somewhat depends on ...


5

It is possible to make the switch, but there are a few components that probably won't be an even swap. This will depend on the vintage of the frame you're planning on using (and it really should be steel as aluminum doesn't age gracefully). Since I have a steel 1992 Bridgestone RB-T, I'll use it as an example. The headset on your bike is most certainly 1 ...


5

No, 400F will not affect frame integrity.


5

If you feel the bike has no significant resale value, then why not just do what would produce the results YOU would like the most? But if you really want to preserve the stickers, but want to avoid the trouble and less than ideal paint job due to masking them, I'm guessing it would be possible to photograph (and PhotoShop) them (or find matching images on ...


4

There is no such thing as "too old" technically speaking -- however 2 things worth considering: too old because out of fashion too old and hard to get compatible components (for example I have 14-years old bike, and I cannot get a clamp for seatpost -- nowadays the diameter is bigger) Now, since we solved "too old" thing -- there is only one issue -- it ...


4

What kind of steel? IIRC, powder coating/anodizing can't be done on all metals, and some metals have less options and are more costly (Such as Ti frames). Also, you have to consider the effect of the heat in the process on the welds, and whether they will be affected. A paint job will probably never be as durable as powdercoating or anodizing, but unless ...


4

In the UK I've had success with Brasso, a cloth and lots and lots of elbow grease. Don't apply it with anything so harsh as wire wool or a scourer, just the impregnated wadding that comes with the product. Unfortunately Brasso in the states is a slightly different composition so I can't vouch for it's efficacy.


4

Yeah, it's an old bike -- before "indexed shifters", making it at least 20 years old, I suspect. (The reflectors suggest to me that it's probably not over about 30 years old, though.) Apparently, from the sound of things, it's working fairly well, though, and should be reasonably safe if a few details are given attention. First off, the tires and tubes, ...


4

Powder coating, done right, is quite durable. I have had it done on an old steel frame a few years ago and have been happy with the result. The more expensive alternative is regular paint. As far as vehicle owners go, you can't find ones that are more vain than motorcycle riders. These people often get paint or powder coat jobs done. The good news for us is ...


3

Return the bolt. You need to turn it out only for a half inch, then easily strike it with a hammer. (Don't make a strong strike, to not drive in the quill stem if it rusted!) Usually it will be enough, Yet it can be a little rusted, so hitting with your hand on the handles will help. Sometimes it's very rusted, so you will need to use some oil to deal with ...


3

Why don't you see how well you do at recreating the sticker set/finding it on ebay THEN decide on your restoration strategy? @Daniel's answer applies. Get them made up in Photoshop, certainly go for the better paint job first, particularly if restoration is the dream. Clearcoat over the stickers is a nice feature too. Most UK frame restorers/painters have ...


3

A long time ago I used some clamp on cable housing guides on a frame & I didn't have any issues with them moving. I did have a slightly larger cable housing with teflon sleeves inside, so that the clamps could be screwed down fairly tightly and still allow for easy movement of the cable inside. You might want to see if you can get perhaps another ...


2

Good Stuff Kalamane, Nothing like finding an old bike and doing it up. There does not appear to be much wrong with it that a good clean and oiling/grease will not solve. As mentioned by others go over the mechanical components/nuts and ensure they are fixed and tightened up. The components maybe old fashioned (retro?) but will work just as well as new ...


2

This looks well worth the effort. As @gcb says you can do it yourself and learn how to take care of everything on the bike. Although it does not have index gears and everything else fancy and sophisticated you can ride worry free about anyone stealing it and those handlebars should be nice and relaxed. One point of concern is the front brake - I would like ...


2

You've got a bike there with thoroughly outmoded technology. The handlebar-mounted friction shifters are likely functional, but take quite a bit of practice to use properly. The old-style cantilever brakes are likely functional as well but not nearly as powerful as modern equipment. I would imagine that's a ten-speed (5-cogs) freewheel on the rear end of ...


2

With all respect, you should look at a new bike, or a used one which is far more current than the one you've got now. If you are uncomfortable riding it, feel unsafe, or it requires more skill than you have to ride it comfortably, then get one that is comfortable and safe for you. You can buy a new, basic mountain bike, hybrid. or urban bike for about $500 ...


2

0000 steel wool and elbow grease, follow with a chrome polish.


2

There are a lot of business that will strip/repaint a bicycle frame using quality paint. Cyclart (Some customers report issues with their service, however); Yellow Jersey; The Color Factory advertises in Velo News, $140 for a repaint with Imron; Joe's Bicycle Painting; Joe Bell's Bicycle Refinishing; And the list goes on...


2

Is there any difference between professionally painting a car and a bike frame? has a lot of suggestions about powder coating. DIY Painting a Bike Frame: Is it possible? talks about stove enamel as an alternative to powder coating.


1

The answer is less "can" it take the wheel (yes it can physically fit) but more an issue of safety. Misapplication of a quick release (QR) can happen. If the QR is not tightened properly the constant vibration experienced riding off road can cause it to loosen further. Older forks may be missing "lawyer lips" (little tabs at the bottom of the drop out) ...


1

Assuming the wheel fits into the fork, you can use quick release. As for your old wheels, you could find a same sized hollow axle and replace it or attach something like axle release to turn it into a quick-releasey wheel. See this bicycles.SE thread as well. And Sheldon on how to properly use quick release.


1

Yes. The grease will aid in installation as well as later removal.


1

Cane creek has a headset finder table on their website. You can search by dimension or bike brand and model.


1

I've read that using damp aluminum foil is the ticket. Check this out: common way to clean a rusted chrome surface such as a fender is to use a fine steel wool. However, when you use this method you have to use a lot of elbow grease and you still end up with a slightly dull surface with some amount of scratching not to mention the messy 'dust' left over ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible