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15

As (almost) always, the great Sheldon Brown has covered this particular topic. Standing while Cycling To Sit or to Stand? It is my belief that a great many cyclists stand up to pedal much more often than they should. I've often said: "If you find yourself standing to accelerate, on level ground, it is a sign that your gear is too high or that ...


15

I think that this is a bad advice you've heard (by many?). For pedaling seated, the seat has only one position; the proper one. See How do I determine the correct position for my bicycle seat? for info on how to set it correctly. Regarding the flab thing, as far as I know touching your stomach with your thighs (or any other part of your body) will not ...


14

To complement Neil Fein's answer, the rider's position is almost entirely controlled (given a particular rider) by the geometry of the bike. Compare the following bikes. In the first image of a hybrid bike, the saddle is slightly below the handlebars. In the second image depicting a road racing bike, the saddle is well above it, forcing the rider to lean ...


13

I think this relates quite nicely to motorbikes where you corner at very high speeds and I'll give a run-down of the techniques, why they are useful and how they apply, and how they might apply to cycling. So when turning left: You shift your weight over on the seat and tilt the bike left. This allows the centre of gravity to be slightly lower, aiding in ...


11

Yes there is one main trick, and some regular skills. The trick is: if you LOWER THE TIRE PRESSURE, any tire will float over sand like magic. It should not be so underinflated as to allow easy pinch flats, but the lower the pressure, the more marked the floating effect. There are just two limitations: If the tire is skinny (low volume) it might not be ...


8

I agree with Hicks sentiment that the crank "giving" is more likely due to worn parts or misalignment. The crank would have to flex a lot to actually be responsible for ghost shifting, which would make it incredibly poor quality. Sheldon's article strikes me as cursory for "When Should You Stand"... Assuming you have the gearing for whatever you're riding ...


8

What you're referring to is tucking, an act that's most easily done with drop bars - the curved handlebars with multiple hand positions you see on road bikes. The holy grail for some hardcore roadies (road cyclists) is the flat back, where the rider is tucked all the way forward, their hands on the lower part of the drop bars - the "drops". This is done so ...


8

There isn't really any reason you can't stand while pedaling. If your drive train is not adjusted properly then they will experience skipping or mis-shifting. That's an entirely separate issue from being able to stand up and pedal.


8

Yes, a more aggressive stance requires a narrower saddle. Your pelvic bone is a fairly complicated structure, but there's basically a triangle that you sit on with a saddle. There's two bumps ("ischial protrusions") at the back end that take your weight if you're sitting with your back straight up (such as on a chair or the saddle of a cruiser or dutch ...


6

While it's true that your hips rocking indicates that the seat is too high, there is a different rule of thumb for knee pain related to the fore and aft position of the saddle. It's easy to remember: If your knee hurts in front, your seat is too far forward. If your knee hurts in the back, your seat is to far backward. The most important thing to ...


6

Low seats provide clearance for more acrobatic body movements. This is essential for bunny hops and nearly every other trick which builds off of this skill. If you look at trials bikes they similarly have lots of clearance for the rider over the frame and the saddle. Since speeds are relatively low, and long distance riding is not the goal, pedaling ...


5

Your question is based on an incorrect assumption about how a bicycle makes turns. You say "...move my bottom to the left and this is sufficient to tilt the bicycle to the left." Unfortunately, what you are stating above is simply impossible in practice. A bicycle can be thought of as a vehicle that is "attached" to the surrounding environment by an ...


5

There are some very good answers on here that go part way to explaining why there are something like 2000 saddles on the market. You did not mention whether you dress up for your daily commute with padded cycling shorts, however, your hybrid bike is designed for more general use, i.e. jeans and T-shirt, not the padded shorts. Hence it has a padded seat and ...


5

I have plenty of experiance in insanely soft sand. Before you leave : 29er, wide tyres, low pressure. BUT Low preasure costs when you get back onto hard stuff, as do insanely wide tyres. I set the bike up to go well on the hard stuff, and pay the price on the soft sections. On the track : Riding style is Weight Back, Very high cadence, great balance ...


4

I have personally ridden and raced on many sandy courses and trails (e.g. Moab) and the best advice is to shift your weight back, relax and think about guiding rather than steering the bike. You will never be able to ride in a perfectly straight line, so get over it or avoid sand. Rather you need to let the bike move and shift around under you. You will ...


4

It all depends on your saddle. As someone who has just been enlightened, some saddles are supposed to be pointed a bit nose up. Take the brooks flyer for instance, it is not the front that is supposed to be level. It is the back making the front point a bit upwards. I think of it less of a seat then a hammock. I have also had a saddle that was a left over ...


4

Try changing the seat angle. I'm tall as you, and had the same problem. I changed to a bigger frame, but the real solution was to set my seat a bit off the horizontal (back is lower than front). Seat and handlebar are at same height. No more sliding.


4

As others have said, what you're specifically suggesting sounds bad. Your seat will have a correct height, dependent on the geometry of your frame and the length of your legs. Period. Get it wrong and your knees will complain. But I can add something regarding fighting flab. I was around 105kg back in 2008, I've been about 75kg for the last couple of years. ...


4

I'm speaking very generally here, but sitting straight up can be comfortable for quite short periods. Probably the most upright are sit-up-and-beg bikes, and if you go over to Holland you'll see 70- and 80-year-olds riding them. The downside is that they're not the fastest bikes around. At the other end of the scale, take a look at professional road racers. ...


3

The pros you see on the videos set their saddle depending on the DH course. If the course has a lot of possibilities for pedalling and not many drops - set it high, so on flat sections they can rest their bum on the seat and give it a full pedalling power. If the course is rough and steep - no racer will have the seat high. So you should do. You know what ...


3

I assume you have worked out the problem is your center of gravity is too far back, so there is not enough weight on the front wheel. This is a common problem, and I have found my new bike is worse than any other I have ridden- I went for a smallish frame for tight technical single track. I am still playing around to see what I can do. I assume you have ...


3

Changing from 50 to 65 (or the opposite) is definitely noticeable. And depending on your needs, switching may improve your riding. Switching from 50 to 65 will mean more pressure on the front end. That means better cornering (the front end will not wash out easily) and more stability on the downhill. Some people also mention that it'll improve climbing on ...


3

When it comes to turning on a bicycle, the two most important things you can do are: Keep your weight as close to the bike as possible. Simply put, your center of gravity should be as close to your bike as possible. If your turning left and sitting straight up with your torso haning off to the right of the bike the turn is going to be much more difficult ...


3

A significant factor is that the narrower saddle results in less friction on the inside of the legs -- important when you're riding for hours in a relatively fixed position, but less so when riding for shorter periods or in conditions where you're shifting positions frequently. Likewise, the wider saddle provides more support when you're shifting positions ...


3

You likely need a bike fit. The body position for using aero should be quite different than riding on hoods. Unfortunately, there really isn't a good compromise between a road and a TT/aero position. I recommend getting a professional bike fit. I'm including the "quick fit" below, but there are too many factors in play and millimeters matter. If possible, ...


3

It depends on the bike. If you're commuting on a race bike, you'll be more hunched over than if you were commuting on a cruiser. A lot of people use road bikes in NYC, which force you to be more hunched over than on something like a citibike. The parts of the bike which contribute to the hunched over ness is primarily the top tube length (the top bar on a ...


2

How much extension of the leg do you get? The old way to check this (I think there are now other approaches) was to have someone hold the bike (or have it in a stand) while you sat on it and pedaled backwards with your heels on the pedals. With this setup your legs should be fully extended at the bottom of the stroke. Then, when you place the balls of ...


2

I would say that the knee thing won't give you any real advantage and is more or less some imitation of the "coolness" of motorcycle racers. The second thing, where you push your bike down into the turn while keeping your body more upright has some advantages when used in the right situation. On a paved road -- as pointed out in your question -- it ...


2

To ignore what may be a bad idea in terms of bicycle posture and address what seems to be central to your question, which is the reduction of flab, you need to know this about flab: You cannot spot-reduce. With the exception of liposuction. Your DNA determines where your fat ends up. You know how some ladies have normal upper bodies but have very large ...


2

First choice is flat or drop bars Flat bars Mountain bike style bars. A more upright position. Comfortable and agile but not very aerodynamic. The single position is fatiguing on long rides. Drop bars Road style bars. A variety of positions to spread fatigue and deal with head winds. The distance between the seat and the bars and the height of the ...



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