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8

I think most people find the bike-to-run transition quite difficult while the legs adjust from going in a circular motion to running. Particularly for longer distance courses. Here's an interesting article from a renowned triathlon athlete/coach: http://www.trainingbible.com/joesblog/2007/01/cleat-position.html The article discusses the merits of putting ...


4

As others have said, just because the bike shop says it's a good fit, doesn't make it so. Their incentive is to sell a bike off the floor so they'll find the one that fits best and sell it to you. I got a custom fit and I have longer thighs than most people. This meant that to get the seat position right, I had to have my saddle further back from the pedals ...


4

First choice is flat or drop bars Flat bars Mountain bike style bars. A more upright position. Comfortable and agile but not very aerodynamic. The single position is fatiguing on long rides. Drop bars Road style bars. A variety of positions to spread fatigue and deal with head winds. The distance between the seat and the bars and the height of the ...


4

I'm speaking very generally here, but sitting straight up can be comfortable for quite short periods. Probably the most upright are sit-up-and-beg bikes, and if you go over to Holland you'll see 70- and 80-year-olds riding them. The downside is that they're not the fastest bikes around. At the other end of the scale, take a look at professional road racers. ...


3

It depends on the bike. If you're commuting on a race bike, you'll be more hunched over than if you were commuting on a cruiser. A lot of people use road bikes in NYC, which force you to be more hunched over than on something like a citibike. The parts of the bike which contribute to the hunched over ness is primarily the top tube length (the top bar on a ...


3

There are many factors to consider. Without being able to be scientific about it, people do evolve a natural pedal technique and I don't see the point in trying to radically change it, rather you should first have your bike fit and set up performed properly, and then allow your own natural style to evolve. There have been major cycling champions that were ...


2

You probably just have the wrong saddle. The width of the saddle has to match the width of your sit bones. My reading of your question is that only the very far back of the saddle is wide enough to comfortably support your sit bones. The first thing to do is determine the width of your sit bones. This article has some good suggestions. Is it possible ...


1

The bike is designed to support your weight during normal driving conditions, namely sitting. However you can usually stand up with little extra tear since the frame is constructed to support your entire weight on any one pedal (Usually how you get on to the bike in the first place). Care should be taken as to how much force you apply to the drive chain, but ...


1

Depending on your riding position on the road bike and the commuter bike, you will need up to 4cm wider seats on your commuter bike. Ask a friend to take a picture of you sitting on the bike, and review the picture, to determine your sitting position. See my answer here for the details with pictures: Sitbone width recommendations from SQ Lab



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