Hot answers tagged

13

Standing up on a bike, especially when you lack fitness, is a good way to go "anaerobic." Put simply, that means your body is working so hard, it can't get enough oxygen. You can only do that for a short amount of time, which for most people is in the range of 10-30 seconds. Then the lactic acid build up in your muscles becomes too painful and you are forced ...


12

Boardman used what is known as the "Superman" position, as shown in this image. This position has been deemed to be against the rules by the UCI. Compare it to the position that Wiggins had on the bike, shown here. His arms are not as outstretched, and therefore it is not as aerodynamic. The superman position was first used in the hour record attempt ...


8

I would suggest attaching the bars and doing some test rides. Is your bike, with it's aggressive geometry, stable when using them? Are you comfortable using them? Does this new position provide some relief, or is it just more annoying? I think you're the only one who can determine if they'll be an advantage to you. In general, I'd think the extra ...


7

Regarding part 1: I'd start by raising the stack height a bit so that you lean on your wrists with less weight; your position will be more upright and less aerodynamic. Along with this, make sure your saddle is properly adjusted for height. More importantly you should try strengthening your abdominal muscles. With a stronger core you will be able to ...


7

Pedaling while standing always takes more effort; we do it when we need the extra boost. When you were younger and rid[ing] a bicycle a lot, you were also fitter. I'm guessing you have had a sedentary job for a while, so now your whole system needs to build up again. This is, unfortunately in our modern world, normal. As with any strength / fitness ...


6

As @Daniel has commented, and I agreed, you probably have a bike fit problem. We cannot be sure; the only way to find out for sure is to get a professional fitting done. Having said that there are still a few things you can try. While you say you try to adjust my hand positions, what positions do you use most? ... The Allez handlebar setup is one I ...


5

This is most likely because you are putting your weight right on the median nerve (see first picture). Padded gloves may help a bit, but I suspect your hand position is more likely to be the problem. Other common hand nerve problems with riding can compression of the ulnar nerve, which will present itself as a different area of sensation than what you ...


5

I ride a pro racer XL BMX. They are built for speed. I keep my seat down for 2 reasons. all my pedaling is done standing up -- power is everything for a racer. My saddle is made of one material only -- composite material -- its like sitting on a steel plate. I only use it to coast on and relax -- and that is only after the race. However, If I ...


4

They would be yes. Beyond the advantage of providing an additional position, they actually provide a bigger benefit of (properly setup) a more aero position. Theoretically this could increase your average speed and provide you with less time in the saddle. All things equal, I consider the extra position (when you already have ~4) to be a minimal impact. ...


3

Caveat: As mentioned by @R.Chung if you are uncertain, it is best to seek clarification from your coach. You are after all paying for their services. Short Answer Bike positioning is always a compromise between goals, flexibility and ability. There are different aero positions and each will have different strengths and weaknesses (see my suggestions ...


3

Of course, you will have less control over your bike if you don't hold the handle bars, especially if something unexpected happens (like a truck coming out of nowhere at full speed for example). Regarding sitting upright, you are very lucky to be able to keep your back straight like that, most people have a bad posture, and are not comfortable sitting ...


3

Some things you can do to alleviate hand/wrist pain: Raise handlebars and/or shorter stem Padded gloves Double layer of handlebar tape or gel pads under the tape Move hand location frequently between cross bar, hoods, corners and drops (for me at least, when my handlebars are higher I tend to spend more time in the drops) If you want to maintain your ...


3

I know this is an old thread, and you've probably solved the problem by now. But that bike frame is too small for you.


2

Tendonitis(tendonosis) is one possibility, however I would expect some pain during riding especially during the beginning of your ride. When you say biceps tendon I assume you mean near your elbow. That said, the first things I would investigate are ulnar nerve irritation or compression at the cubital tunnel a/o the ligament of Struther's. The ulnar nerve ...


2

Nitto makes a tall quill stem called the Technomic that will give you about 160 mm of extension above the minimum insert line. I've seen them in the Rivendell, Harris Cyclery, and Velo Orange catalogs. The Rivendell one is fancy and polished and costs more. There are also extenders that allow you to use a standard quill stem. They aren't pretty but they get ...


2

There are a couple of things you can try before throwing down serious money on a professional fit or a new bike (side note, if you buy a new bike from a shop be sure to negotiate a free fitting session if it doesn't come with one automatically). First, the most obvious thing to do is to get some proper bicycle specific gloves with beefy gel pads on the ...


2

Feet on the pedals, hands on the handle bars, one or two fingers on your brake levers would be a base position. If you're doing something technical, then bum off the seat or at least unweighted, with pedals fore-and-aft. Doesn't matter which pedal leads, but it'll probably be your primary side, right foot for those who are right handed. Peddling when you ...


2

Collectively, some good advice here. I first used tri-bars (sometimes referred to as aero-bars) for long rides back 30 years ago, on a touring bike. The two biggest benefits were: extra position to to take the weight off my hands and put the body/back into a different position (you lean further forward) less wind resistance and easier pedaling, especially ...


1

Will they be an advantage? Depends. They may be an aerodynamic advantage but a handling and physical fatigue and wear disadvantage. With the aero position comes a very unnatural neck angle needed to look straight ahead. You may say 'oh well I'll just rest and look straight down for a sec' and soon you might be picking weeds out of your teeth. I've done ...


1

Depends what surface you're riding. Aero position has more effect at higher speeds, so if you're pootling along some singletrack at 20 km/h its not worth bothering. If you're ripping along a flat smooth offroad path at above 30 km/h then you're best having your hands wide apart to cope with anything unexpected. The only time I'd recommend an aero "tuck" ...


1

If you ride alone you could try clip-on aerobars. With these you basically get rid of all strain on your hands and better aerodynamics


1

When I started riding again, after many years, standing was very hard – like couldn't do it hard. My legs ached as soon as I started and it was really hard to control the bike. Now, a year and change later, I almost enjoy it. I often stand to push up the last part of a hill or to do a short hill without shifting. My advice would be to find opportunities to ...


1

The frame size and shape could be an issue too. Some frames transfer your effort more efficiently than others. And some frames may do the transfer less efficiently when standing than when sitting. Have you tried stand-pedaling on a different bike? Try borrowing one, you may decide that it is time to buy a different frame.


1

It protects your balls from being smashed and when you ride if bike it feels nice to just sit down and be low to he ground with a low center of gravity. It makes it a lot easier to bust off tricks and just feel comfortable sitting down waiting for your turn in the bowls.


1

It’s not only a matter of handlebar type. You can already try to get into a more aerodynamic position with your straight handlebar. A shorter straight handlebar can be quite aerodynamic. On a road bike the drops are mostly used for descents, normaly one uses the “hoods” or the tops which aren’t all that “aggressive” or overly aerodynamic. See also ...


1

Drop bars are possible, but you need to measure the effective top tube of your frame and the "reach" of a new drop bar you want to purchase. You didn't tell what hybrid bike you have but I assume the effective top tube on your bike is longer than ones on road bikes. Another consideration is that drop bars have additional reach forward (70-80mm). There's ...


1

I'd start off just riding your bike and noticing what you like (and don't like about your position). Mostly I'd worry about the bars being too low and not having enough options (get low to get out of the wind, sit up straight when your back or neck needs a break, and on and on...). The important thing is that you're comfortable – and as long as the bike ...


1

When spending more time on your bike, it's good to be able to vary your position. For that reason alone I would advice a drop bar or butterfly bar. It'll prevent all kind of small complaints about wrists, shoulders and back. Getting in better shape because of the extra daily exercise, you'll gradually feel more comfortable in a more sportive (aerodynamic) ...


1

I did this exact change on my 1993 road bike. The quill stem was short and had 120 mm of reach, combined with old school drops made me feel like I was reaching forwards too much. So I found an alloy SR stem on trademe (ebay) and fitted that. It is 50mm taller and the reach is only 50mm, so I can now hold the hoods comfortably. So search ebay for ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible