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12

Boardman used what is known as the "Superman" position, as shown in this image. This position has been deemed to be against the rules by the UCI. Compare it to the position that Wiggins had on the bike, shown here. His arms are not as outstretched, and therefore it is not as aerodynamic. The superman position was first used in the hour record attempt ...


8

I think most people find the bike-to-run transition quite difficult while the legs adjust from going in a circular motion to running. Particularly for longer distance courses. Here's an interesting article from a renowned triathlon athlete/coach: http://www.trainingbible.com/joesblog/2007/01/cleat-position.html The article discusses the merits of putting ...


7

Regarding part 1: I'd start by raising the stack height a bit so that you lean on your wrists with less weight; your position will be more upright and less aerodynamic. Along with this, make sure your saddle is properly adjusted for height. More importantly you should try strengthening your abdominal muscles. With a stronger core you will be able to ...


5

As others have said, just because the bike shop says it's a good fit, doesn't make it so. Their incentive is to sell a bike off the floor so they'll find the one that fits best and sell it to you. I got a custom fit and I have longer thighs than most people. This meant that to get the seat position right, I had to have my saddle further back from the pedals ...


5

As @Daniel has commented, and I agreed, you probably have a bike fit problem. We cannot be sure; the only way to find out for sure is to get a professional fitting done. Having said that there are still a few things you can try. While you say you try to adjust my hand positions, what positions do you use most? ... The Allez handlebar setup is one I ...


3

Some things you can do to alleviate hand/wrist pain: Raise handlebars and/or shorter stem Padded gloves Double layer of handlebar tape or gel pads under the tape Move hand location frequently between cross bar, hoods, corners and drops (for me at least, when my handlebars are higher I tend to spend more time in the drops) If you want to maintain your ...


3

You probably just have the wrong saddle. The width of the saddle has to match the width of your sit bones. My reading of your question is that only the very far back of the saddle is wide enough to comfortably support your sit bones. The first thing to do is determine the width of your sit bones. This article has some good suggestions. Is it possible ...


3

There are many factors to consider. Without being able to be scientific about it, people do evolve a natural pedal technique and I don't see the point in trying to radically change it, rather you should first have your bike fit and set up performed properly, and then allow your own natural style to evolve. There have been major cycling champions that were ...


2

Nitto makes a tall quill stem called the Technomic that will give you about 160 mm of extension above the minimum insert line. I've seen them in the Rivendell, Harris Cyclery, and Velo Orange catalogs. The Rivendell one is fancy and polished and costs more. There are also extenders that allow you to use a standard quill stem. They aren't pretty but they get ...


1

If you ride alone you could try clip-on aerobars. With these you basically get rid of all strain on your hands and better aerodynamics


1

You may want to actually try adjusting your saddle up instead of back. If your saddle is too low, you may be compensating by rolling back on the seat as you pedal. Adjusting your seat up will push it back a little anyway, but it's something worth trying.


1

It’s not only a matter of handlebar type. You can already try to get into a more aerodynamic position with your straight handlebar. A shorter straight handlebar can be quite aerodynamic. On a road bike the drops are mostly used for descents, normaly one uses the “hoods” or the tops which aren’t all that “aggressive” or overly aerodynamic. See also ...


1

Drop bars are possible, but you need to measure the effective top tube of your frame and the "reach" of a new drop bar you want to purchase. You didn't tell what hybrid bike you have but I assume the effective top tube on your bike is longer than ones on road bikes. Another consideration is that drop bars have additional reach forward (70-80mm). There's ...


1

I'd start off just riding your bike and noticing what you like (and don't like about your position). Mostly I'd worry about the bars being too low and not having enough options (get low to get out of the wind, sit up straight when your back or neck needs a break, and on and on...). The important thing is that you're comfortable – and as long as the bike ...


1

When spending more time on your bike, it's good to be able to vary your position. For that reason alone I would advice a drop bar or butterfly bar. It'll prevent all kind of small complaints about wrists, shoulders and back. Getting in better shape because of the extra daily exercise, you'll gradually feel more comfortable in a more sportive (aerodynamic) ...


1

The bike is designed to support your weight during normal driving conditions, namely sitting. However you can usually stand up with little extra tear since the frame is constructed to support your entire weight on any one pedal (Usually how you get on to the bike in the first place). Care should be taken as to how much force you apply to the drive chain, but ...



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