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15

Your frame and fork already have disc tabs, which is the first step. The second is a disc wheelset, which it does not appear that the stock wheels are. Disc hubs come in two varieties: the common six-bolt ISO and the proprietary Shimano Centerlock, the former are identifiable by a large six-bolt-hole protrusion on the left (non-drive) side of the bike. ...


12

This is normal to some extent - brake pads have to be made of soft material which wears down on the rims (and conversely, the rims wear down into the brake pads to some extent) in order to stop you. This means the pads pick up grime and bits of metal from the rims and road and stuff which embed into the pads and in turn wear down your rims / reduce braking ...


9

There are a few causes for brake 'squealing': New pads. After a bit of wear (or sandpapering), the squealing will stop. Misalignment. As some others have mentioned, misalignment may cause squealing (although it would be reduced with some wear). Check out Sheldon Brown's tips for alignment suggestions. Oil or water on the rim. Either of these substances, ...


8

I like disc brakes for these reasons: they're easier to keep oil off than rims bent wheels don't rub easier to adjust easier to get wheels in and out my rims don't wear out oh yes, they stop well too, but that's my last reason, not first!


8

The braking surface on your rims shouldn't be painted, it will just reduce the brake's effectiveness and the paint will quickly wear out. In fact, over time rim brakes will actually wear down the metal on the braking surface. (After a lot of use, this area can get dangerously thin and the rims will need to be replaced.) Painting below the braking surface ...


8

V-brakes can be hateful and make a lot of sound if they're improperly adjusted- sometimes they're noisy even when they're properly adjusted, especially on braking surfaces that are not machined. You can usually alleviate this with one or more of the following methods. First and foremost, make sure your pads are properly adjusted. This is better ...


7

Brakes have to be toed in. What that means is that the front of the brake pad has to touch the rim before the back of the brake pad. It does not have to be an extreme variance but it will make a world of difference when properly adjusted. Hopefully you have aluminum rims. I have had the misfortune of working on some bikes with steel rims from which I ...


7

Since you have gone for steel rims and need to stop in the wet and are unlikely to upgrade to alloy rims straight away, I think you are deserved of a practical answer... In the wet, with regular brake blocks, the alloy rim will have a better coefficient of friction than the steel rim. This much is known and these brake blocks are the wrong ones for your ...


7

From what I've read, you should have a slight angle (called "toe-in") between the rims and the pads to prevent them from squeaking. Angle them so that the front of the pad angles towards the rim. When applying full force, the entire brake pad should come in contact with the rim. See this question for more information about relieving squeaking from your ...


7

Some disc-brake specific wheels use rims that are not designed for rim brakes. To accomplish what you want you need a wheel with a a disc-brake hub and a rim-brake rim. With that setup, assuming the fork widths are the same, you should be able to switch wheels between bikes without problems. The only drawback is the slight increase in rotating mass from ...


6

I love disc brakes. I took a 2002 Trek Alpha 4500 with the goal of making a raceworthy hardtail bike, and I knew that disc brakes were a must. I love making wheels, so I laced my own front and rear wheels to my own specifications. Making your own wheels is a big undertaking if you're new at it, and since you want to make sure the disc wheels are strong, ...


6

I'll share my personal formula, which I use myself and in a couple bikes I often perform maintenance to, and that are ridden by other people. These tips are for V-brake or "linear pull" type, but the same can be applied to other types too, at least caliper and cantilever, as long as they are cable actuated (i.e. no hydraulic). First of all, I check brake ...


5

The 'tire guide' screws are for deep section carbon fibre rims. The idea of the brake shoe holder is that you replace just the rubber bit, not the entire shoe. In this way you do not lose your settings, as happens when you replace the entire brake block, not just the rubber bit. For speedy wheel swapping, i.e. in race conditions, the 'tire guide' exists. ...


5

The shop are correct. Steel or chrome plated steel rims will give poor braking power in wet conditions. Even under normal dry conditions braking power is considerably lower when compared to aluminium rims. You should expect a braking power improvement of up to 4 times by switching to aluminium rims. From wikipedia: Rim brakes are cheap, light, ...


5

There's no problem mounting a disc-compatible hub to rim-brake compatible rim. Just make sure they've got the same number of spokes and you're good to go. You're absolutely right about the opposite though, disc brake rims generally do not have a braking surface on them, the rim profile is round there, so it wouldn't work. And if you did try to brake on it, ...


4

A number. Generally, they are unaffected by wet conditions, whereas rim brakes can get dicey in the wet. As well, for off-road bikes, they are less susceptible to mud, dust, and sand, and the attendant rim wear as well as poor braking. Also, on long descents or downhill sections, there is no danger of rim-heating and tire failure. Downside... You need ...


4

Yes, aluminium rims help wet braking performance a lot compared to chrome plated steel rims. You still usually need roughly one rotation of the wheel for the brake block to wipe off most of the water film before you get really good braking, but there's still almost no comparison to steel rims. One thing to keep in mind though: if you do a lot of riding in ...


4

The mounting arms are meant to be bent. Bend them as needed to fit your bike. If they can't be made to fit then likely a visit to a local hardware store (especially if staffed by some reasonably clever salesperson) will yield a solution. Or your local bike shop folks may find a suitable bracket in their junk parts box.


4

I have already bought some pads that the LBS had for more than 4 years, and they work perfectly. I think the specific compounds from which brake pads (and tires, most probably) is not prone to self-degeneration if stored in a "normal" environment. So, the suggestion would be to take a ride and check if the pads brake well. If so, use normally.


4

The one thing to be aware of is that disk brakes put more force on the spokes during breaking than rim brakes. Mostly this is not an issue as long as you do not use radial spoking. If you build up the wheel with 3x and anything but super silly light spokes, it should be no problem at all.


4

Magura hydraulic rim brakes are a quality product. They still make these and many of the older models are sought-after in the retro mountain bike scene. They are durable and perform very well. From your pictures it seems you have direct mounts on your frame specifically for these brakes, this is now most common on trials bikes. The brake pad fitting is the ...


3

I think those are McMahon Racing Components, possibly their "Power-Link" model. See: http://mombat.org/MOMBAT/BikeHistoryPages/McMahon.html http://www.blackbirdsf.org/brake_obscura/mtb.html


3

...where to begin! So much was wrong with cantilevers and linear-pull came along and made the cycling world a happier place. This list will grow, but, as I remember, the following things were morally wrong with cantilevers: the front cable often routed via the stem on a pulley hidden inside the stem. Over time this pulley would fray the cable and the ...


3

The main reason that the V brake was invented is that it approximates a center-pull cantilever in terms of balanced force and leverage, while not requiring that the cable be anchored at some point above the wheel. This is important for front wheels on suspension forks, but not significant for most other uses. Another slight advantage of the V brake is that ...


3

You shouldn't even need to heat up the arms. Just bend them whichever way you'd like; it's easiest if you have access to a vice. You might even look at having them make an 'X', if that pulls the mounting arm away from the brake. By design, the horizontal stays should have a minimum amount of force on them - they handle keeping the rack from rotating ...


3

I have been using disc brakes on my Mountain, Cyclocross, and Road bikes for well over 10 years now. Earlier disc brake versions certainly took a while to reach excellent, smooth, and modulated braking power levels that they currently enjoy. In that context, a poorly adjusted or designed disc brake vs. a well adjusted v-brake showed less performance ...


2

I'm not sure I would get disk brakes again. I used to have v-brakes, but thought disk brakes would be better. The advantages stated are true but I've found: They are harder to maintain. I was able to make simple adjustments to my v-brakes very easily, but I don't know where to start with disk brakes. (This could just be lack of knowledge on my part) If ...


2

They work even when it's wet (I think that's because rims get wetter because they're closer to the ground; and, because they have a bigger surface area, they take longer to dry). Brakes that work when it's wet are especially useful when in traffic, or going downhill. Good brakes might also be useful on a cycle path in the evening: it seems that small ...



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