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I had a persistent problem with squealing Shimano LX V-brakes years ago. Switching to XT V-brakes and trying 5 different kinds of brake pads didn't help. Toe in, toe out, no toe, mistletoe - nothing made any difference. Eventually I got a new fork with disk brake mounting tabs and installed an inexpensive mechanical disk brake (Avid) and never had to ...


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I tried doing a "cross" toe-in/toe-out with my brakes (really just adjusted the right-front to be toe-out and left the left one alone with its "toe-in" ). They have been virtually silent for 3 short rides so far. I'll update if this changes with wear.


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I would try something less expensive first. For me, switching to Kool Stop brake pads has worked even better than toeing in when in resolving this type of vibration. I'm not surprised that replacing the front wheel didn't affect the problem since it's not likely to be the cause of the vibration.


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I switched from an aluminum fork to carbon and the brakes howled like crazy. I went the usual route of cleaning, adjusting etc. What worked is counterintuitive, but I toed the shoes out. The noise went away immediately. I read somewhere that it can have something to do with the harmonics of the carbon fork. So I have the rears toed in and the front toed out ...


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I have a bike with cantilevers and I can understand the frustration. I spent a lot of time last summer getting my brake pads aligned properly so they didn't squeal. In the end I got it to work with the brakes I had, but it took quite a lot of futzing around to get the angle just right. Some people recommend getting a fork crown mounted cable stop to ...


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Road brake calipers are built with "reach" dimensions. The reach is the distance from the center mounting bolt to the pads. Usually this is a range of values (e.g., 47mm-57mm) as you can adjust the pad vertically within the caliper. It is important you replace the caliper with another caliper of the same reach. If you do not get the appropriate reach you ...


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To start with, an aside. 700x32 describes the physical size of the tyre. 700 is 700mm, which is the diameter of the tyre. That size is very common. 32 is 32mm, and describes the width of the tyre. The wider the tyre, the more rubber in contact with the ground while riding (sometimes you want to have lots of contact, sometimes you don't). Note that due to ...


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There are 2 screws you can see at right side of the brake. the bottom one is just above the pad screw - it's one that holding the cable. Open it a little. Check if the cable is going smooth (if not, you should oil the cable or even replace the cable, and maybe the housing too). Check the pads, that they are not wear, nor dried on sun. Then pull the cable ...



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