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30

As long as you can see the dimple, the rim is still thick enough. When you brake, the rim gets worn. Eventually it is worn so thin that it can break. The dimples help you identify the wear so that you can replace the rim before it breaks.


18

The above video shows how to fit a tight tire / rim combination. Although it shows the Marathon Plus tire, it applies to any tire. The crucial point he makes on the video is that the ...


12

Drilling out your rims will reduce the strength of the rim and increase the likelihood of cutting the valve stem on your tube. For a few dollars you can buy two of these: This adapter threads onto a Presta valve and effectively turns it into a Schrader valve. Presta valve tubes are the same price and are as widely available as Schrader valve tubes, so you ...


11

Short Answer: Yes Longer Answer: Yes, but maybe not for the reasons you are thinking of. Rim wear is mainly caused by dirt and grime that gets caught between the breaks and the rim rubbing it like sand paper. The most important thing to do is clean your rims and pads as often as possible. For that matter clean your drive train as well. As far as different ...


11

Especially when seating a new tire for the first time (and probably more so on a "virgin" rim) it's wise to inflate to about 1/3 or 1/2 final pressure and then roll/bounce the wheel around quite a bit, to work the bead into position. Then deflate, break the bead loose all around, and repeat the process. Then, as you're doing the final inflation, watch the ...


11

No you will not be able to use your 700x23c tire on a 650c rim. The bead seat diameter of 700c rims is 622mm, this will also be the bead diameter of the your 700x23c tire. The bead seat diameter of a 650c rim is 571mm (see Velocity's Spec section). Your 700x23c tire will be 51mm too wide.


10

Here you go: these are leather face brake blocks and they will work ten times better in the wet than any Johnny-come-lately Kool-Stop efforts on your steel rims. Pay no more than £3 a set, plus they last forever, and better when wet than when dry. What more could you want?


9

A tube should not have excess length, and doubling on itself will cause the tire to feel uneven while riding, as well as increase the likelihood of flats. Assuming the tube is the correct size for the tire, as you said it was, there are 2 common causes for this problem. If you installed the tube without inflating it first, just a tiny amount, then it ...


9

In case you really want to drill, the only thing you need is a 10mm drill bit, and a sandpaper to give a smooth finish. It is true that the rim gets weaker, and very narrow rims should not be drilled, but I have performed this enlargement a couple of times and rode the wheels some honest hundreds of km in every kind of terrain, with no problem. I did this ...


9

I'd actually lean toward a shallower rim, but the important bits are going with a high spoke count and either 3x or 4x pattern (both drive and non-drive sides). With a deeper rim, you are changing the angle in the cross patterns and reducing the length. This means that the spoke has to deflect more to handle the cross. This is more noticeable with really ...


9

Again - Following up with an opinion from a self confessed conspiracy theorist. Its about the money - follow the profit tree to its roots When there were only 26" wheels a small LBS needed to have one wheel set in stock, and one sized tire ( maybe 5-10 variations). They would special order specific gear the the customer wanted and could easily stock enough ...


9

Lower spoke numbers are primarily of interest to weight weenies (though for a given price, a lower spoke wheel will probably use a heavier rim offsetting the spoke reduction weight savings). As usual, Sheldon is some good reading. There is also a whole book on how to build wheels well and design decisions, by Jobst Brandt, called "The Bicycle Wheel". What ...


9

Yes. The shorter spokes go on the drive side. Satisfy yourself by looking at the picture below: Imagine two right-angled triangles sharing a common side (the red-dashed line). The hypotenuse of the left triangle (non-drive side) is longer than the hypotenuse of the right triangle (drive side). Generally only by a couple of mm, but it makes a difference. ...


8

With a bike designed around modern "short-reach" 39-49mm calipers, you're going to four main issues: 1) Brake clearance vertically. If everything else is optimal, a 49mm reach caliper should be able to clear around a 32mm tire. You can verify this with an unmounted brake. 2) Brake clearance horizontally. Extra cable tension releases (e.g. in levers or ...


8

The braking surface on your rims shouldn't be painted, it will just reduce the brake's effectiveness and the paint will quickly wear out. In fact, over time rim brakes will actually wear down the metal on the braking surface. (After a lot of use, this area can get dangerously thin and the rims will need to be replaced.) Painting below the braking surface ...


8

This is usually ok. as long as it has strong enough adhesive to stay in place. It's better to overlap it, of course, but as long as the spoke holes are covered it should be ok. A bigger issue is that usually, when the tape comes up short, it means that roll was designed for a 26" wheel, and is going on a 700c rim. If that is the case, make sure the tape is ...


8

Some disc-brake specific wheels use rims that are not designed for rim brakes. To accomplish what you want you need a wheel with a a disc-brake hub and a rim-brake rim. With that setup, assuming the fork widths are the same, you should be able to switch wheels between bikes without problems. The only drawback is the slight increase in rotating mass from ...


7

I have only been defeated by the 700c tyre I tried to get on a 27" wheel, but I have came a long way since then and struggled a few times with 'tight' tyres. That said, there is a lot to be said for a tight fit as it usually sits better when fully inflated. inflate the tube so that 'it has air in it' and looks inflated, but not 'ballooned'. pop tube in ...


7

Yeah, narrow tires can be a bit of a pain, especially when new. And some rims are worse than others -- rims with a thick cross-section are worse. You will sometimes notice that there's a "ditch" in the inside of the rim, along the line of the spoke holes. If so, you can try to work the bead of the tire into that "ditch" so that you get a little more slack ...


7

Yes, this has been done and is very often done for the exact reason you mentioned: far greater tire selection. In a general sense, the important considerations you must make stem from the difference between a 700c wheel and a 27" wheel. If we look at a more precise measurement than the common nomenclature, the bead seat diameter, the difference is more ...


7

Since you have gone for steel rims and need to stop in the wet and are unlikely to upgrade to alloy rims straight away, I think you are deserved of a practical answer... In the wet, with regular brake blocks, the alloy rim will have a better coefficient of friction than the steel rim. This much is known and these brake blocks are the wrong ones for your ...


7

I have worn through quite a few rims, mostly because I live in a hilly area and I ride my bikes more than I clean them. That said, I do think that if you are to clean anything on a bike then the rims are probably what you want to be cleaning most importantly. A couple of years ago I inflated the tyres to the value on the sidewall, walked away from the ...


7

If you take the rim tape off you should be able to shake it out through one of the holes that you insert the nipples through. I've dropped a few inside rims and never had a problem getting them out this way.


7

Check the spokes - its likely one or more has broken ("I felt a shock, like a snap....".). The ones to check are ones that got from the rim, where the rubbing is occurring, to the hub on the opposite side of the rubbing (in your case, the right side of the hub). If these have let go, there is nothing stopping the rim being pulled to the left. It may be ...


6

There's a bunch of weird standards for naming the size of tires and rims, and there's an actual ISO standard. The best thing to do is ignore the big letter printed names that have inconsistent conventions, and look for the ISO standard stuff, like "42-622". The ISO standard size of your tires and rims is 622. (18mm wide rim and 42mm wide tire) ISO 622 is ...


6

The best suggestion I can make is to read "The Art of Wheelbuilding, by Gerd Schraner". As for materials: Use aluminum, double walled rims. They are stronger, lighter, and believe it or not easier for a new wheel builder to get true and round than steel rims will be. In addition, steel rims for a road bike will be difficult to come by in new condition. ...


6

The full answer depends on where you are riding, how you are riding, and the conditions you are riding in. Windy, winding, hilly courses that you tackle on a road bike with some friends would have me leaning towards a less deep set of wheels. A flat calm straight triathlon course on a tri-bike I'd want more depth. With the wheels you are looking at, and the ...


5

The shop are correct. Steel or chrome plated steel rims will give poor braking power in wet conditions. Even under normal dry conditions braking power is considerably lower when compared to aluminium rims. You should expect a braking power improvement of up to 4 times by switching to aluminium rims. From wikipedia: Rim brakes are cheap, light, ...



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