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As for what wheel to choose, well that's such a complex combination of factors, hard to provide a simple answer. I outlined some of the considerations when weighing up choices in my blog post I linked to in an earlier comment on this thread: They involve a range of factors, including, inter alia (and not in any particular order): strength durability ...


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As an owner of both 650c and 700c-wheeled bikes will happily share my thoughts. First of all, 650c wheels are lighter and obviously smaller which makes the whole ride more dynamic which can improve your maneuverability. On the other hand, 650c wheels are prone to sliding on stones or corners so you must be more careful when riding. 650c wheels spin faster ...


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Ahh, no. The rims are different sizes, 700 vs 650, so obviously each will take a different size tire. Why do you want to change to a smaller wheel? Brakes likely will not reach rim. Bicycle would be closer to ground.


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No you will not be able to use your 700x23c tire on a 650c rim. The bead seat diameter of 700c rims is 622mm, this will also be the bead diameter of the your 700x23c tire. The bead seat diameter of a 650c rim is 571mm (see Velocity's Spec section). Your 700x23c tire will be 51mm too wide.


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For the question in the comment: You will have to move the brake pad a bit further down to adapt to the smaller rim. This may possibly lead to that you have to change the brake. Check how much you can lower the brake pad.


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Best place to look is Sheldon Brown's famous site. http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html I would suggest given the difference in diamaeter you will run into issues attempting to put your 700x23c tyres on a 650c rim.


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By the time you get the bike looking similar to the latter, you'd be better off buying the latter. The fork controls part of the geometry and changing the fork will make it different. Also, you need access to tools for replacing the fork (lets leave aside the different types of headsets for now, since that is part of the aesthetic). Then, you need to buy a ...


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The rims spec'd with a lot of new Trek bikes (including yours) are "Tubeless ready". This means that you can run tubeless, but you can also run regular old tires with tubes (i.e. clinchers). The primary advantage of running a tubeless tire (which will be marked as tubeless) is that you can run a lower pressure without getting pinch flats, which is ...


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Many tyres can be made to work without a tube, but tubeless tyres tend to work fine with tubes. The bead of a tubeless tyre is smooth and moulded more accurately than non-tubeless tyres, to form a tighter seal with tubeless-compatible rims. You may be able to achieve tubeless running with a non-tubeless tyre, but it's likely you will need to use more ...


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Some general advice: The bend/wobble is likely nothing to worry about and you can search this site or Google for how to true a wheel. If there's less than 1mm of un-true-ness, I wouldn't even worry about truing it. A new wheelset will likely cost more than the bike, and since it sounds like you have a perfectly good one on the bike already it's hard to ...



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