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1

I had this occur, and it was a monster of my own doing. The first thing I would look at is where you sanded the area that you assumed was somehow unevenly being grabbed by the brakes. I sanded a rim once, and I was careful to boot, but it created this incredible grabbing that was far worse than it was before. The next thing I would look at would be the ...


3

If those wheels have significant mileage on them, you should worry that the rim wall (and braking surface) has become too thin and is bending under the pressure of the pads. Remove the tyre and measure the sidewall thickness with calipers all around the wheel. If part of it is measurably thinner than the rest, or if any part is below 1mm, it might be ...


2

A cheap solution: regular Duc-tape works really well. Put a separate piece over each hole, in case you need to replace a spoke. I've also used it to tape the rim tape directly to the wheel when an old one broke.


5

Measure the rim in a more accurate way for starters. Even 0.1mm can cause a change in the braking power. Also, with the bike resting on its handles and seat, flipped over, ask someone to lightly hold down the front brake while you slowly turn the wheel and figure out exactly where the trouble spot is and how big it is. If there is no visible difference, and ...


10

I figured out a solution. The thing that is supposed to stop the inner tube from expanding into spoke holes is called a rim tape. The tape that came with the bike is really flimsy. I'll purchase and apply a high pressure rim tape. Hopefully that would fix the problem. Update: I've decided to go for a cotton rim tape as they're more durable than rubber ...


-2

You need to toe the brake pads in. The pads are hitting the rim unevenly and causing vibration. I have had to do this many times on my CX bike. The pads need to hit from the front of the pad first, this reduces the chance of vibration occurring. Also using Swissstop pads will help greatly.


1

You should use the tyres that fit the rims on your bike. If you were a professional you'd use whatever your sponsor told you to, so that's a bit of a side issue. Tubulars are back in the MTB world, but they're still rare and it's unlikely your bike has them. I suggest not buying a tubular wheelset, let your sponsors do that when they decide it's a good idea....


3

The hardest to fit tyres I've ever dealt with were continental comfort contact (and I run marathon plus which are reputed to be difficult). Like yours they needed serious overpressure to seat, even after wetting the rim. After several years fitted they're still going strong. I had to change a tube in one recently and it was much easier but still hard to ...


6

Those strings are quite common with continental tires and seem to be a part of their manufacturing process. Every continental tire I have owned seem to have some of those threads, even ones that mounted relatively easily. I just cut them off and have never had an issue with them. Continental tires are also well known for their tight beads. The high-pressure ...



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