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0

No, you can run lower pressure on wider tires. Think about it this way: you need a certain amount of force holding the rims up off of the road. You can get if from a small contact patch and a lot of pressure or from a larger contact area and a lower pressure. But as you increase the width of the rim the tire goes from an approximation of a circle to a box ...


4

Running 23 mm tires on a rim width of 23 mm is insane -- your tires should be around to 40-50 mm. To summarize Sheldon Brown's page: Narrow tire on wide rim = pinch flats + damage from road hazards (which is the case you are in) Wide tire on narrow rim = sidewall damage + rim failure and bad handling You need to get a narrower rim for the bike (or ...


1

Nashbar's specs for the rim list the inner width as 16mm. http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_566766_-1___ (click the "Specs" link) This is a fairly standard width for road wheels, so you should be able to safely run any common road tire size (21mm-35mm give or take a few mm).


0

The pressure you can put in a tyre depends on the tyre and the rim. The tyre bead (the band that stops it popping off the rim) varies from tyre to tyre, and some will not withstand as much pressure as others. An expensive tyre with a kevlar bead should be fine up to 120psi. The volume of the tyre is a factor too, but even a quality large volume MTB tyre ...


4

Ok there are a number of questions in there. 1) 29" vs 26": that's not a question of which would hold your weight better or worse. 29" rolls a bit better, especially over rough ground, so if that's important to you, then go for 29". A bike with a very small frame for a short person, will work better with smaller wheels - i.e. 26" - but at 5'7" I reckon ...


1

Without seeing the rim it's hard to tell exactly what is going on but I suspect you are in a loop where your rim surface got some rough spots which stuck to the brake pads which ground or pulled up some rough spots... and repeat. Since the brake pad change didn't work I'd suggest one of two courses of action. Or both courses but then you start losing track ...


4

If you've used the brake pads up to the point where the metal is exposed, you've used them way too long and possibly caused some rim damage. There are wear indicator grooves on brake pads -- when they're gone, put on new pads. As for having metal embedded in the brake pads, I defer to this question. You might want to try switching pads (Promax stuff is ...


2

It is. The rim joints are never perfect after pinning or welding. Rims that are intended for rim brakes are machined afterwards to have a smooth surface. This rim has instead been painted. The crack comes from the pinned joint. The spokes are pulling the rim together with enough force to keep it from breaking apart. This being said, rims intended for rim ...


3

Take a look at the specs for the rim (or tell us what kind of rim you've got). There are two ways to join a rim. One is to weld the joint, the other is to use a sleeve inside of the rim extrusion that aligns the ends. If your rim is welded, then I would be inclined to agree with Carel. But it if is sleeved then it seems likely that what you're seeing is a ...


-1

I'd say no! There is a visible fissure. The joint was not perfectly welded and opened. I'd take that one back to the shop and have a serious discussion. Of course it could have cracked when you rode over an obstacle and if you hit it right at the weld.



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