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Personally, I ride with a HED Jet 4 on the front and a Jet 5 on the rear. I ride in the Northern California Hills so climbing is a major consideration. I was initially cautious about going so deep because I feared that I would suffer in long sustained climbs. My times climbing were not adversely affected. In fact, I achieved some personal bests in climbing ...


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These 38/50/60/88 numbers are the 'depth' of the wheel's aerodynamic rim, in millimeters. Let's take 38 for example. This means that from where the tire meets the wheel, the rim extends an additional 38 millimeters towards the hub. When you see 88, that means the rim extends 88 millimeters from the tire. Why does that matter? One of the biggest benefits of ...


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Assuming that the rim is thick enough still for safe braking, what I'd do is take the tire off the wheel and lightly sand/file the edges of the marks until they're level with the rest of the braking surface. I wouldn't sand/file until the marks are gone since that will likely give warbling and possibly remove too much of the surface. I'd recommend sanding in ...


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Those tires should work just fine. Any of the MTB slick tires listed on that site would work well with your bike and current rims. You can get too small a tire on too wide a rim, but it takes a much bigger jump than from 2" to 1.5 or so. There is a very conservative guide on Sheldon Brown's bike pages. http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html Given your ...


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There is not an issue going down in size. I see nothing wrong with the tires you have selected. At 300 lbs maybe step up to a 1.75. Just going to a street type tire from the knobby is going to reduce rolling resistance and give you a nicer street ride. When you go down in size that far you should also get new tubes. Once the tubes have been stretched ...


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With MTB tires, there's really no issue in drilling out the valve hole to a larger size since the rims are so wide to begin with. You can do it yourself with a drill bit (3/8" or 10mm) or have your LBS do it. Sanding or reaming the hole afterwards is important, as well as making sure there aren't any sharp metal bits floating around afterwards that might ...



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