Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

5.5mm spoke holes sounds ridiculously large and it would not surprise me if that's not correct. Ryde don't mention it on their generic V38 page nor do "Flying Pigeon" on their Westwood listing but they do suggest 2.0mm spokes. No mention of needing large head nipples though. If you can try the large head in the rim before buying definitely do that. ...


1

Are you running the wheels as tubeless? If you are you'll want to be sure that the rims and tires are rated for sufficient pressure. Last time I was looking at tubeless (early-2015) I wasn't having much luck finding road rims and tires. I think that the issue was the pressures that need to be run to support the narrower tires. But if you're running tubes, ...


6

You can (theoretically) mount any 700x(something) tire on any 700c (ISO 622) rim. However, you need to make sure the frame (and brakes if rim brakes are used) can clear the tire without rubbing. You generally want to match the rim width to the tire though -- too narrow or too wide of a tire on a rim can lead to tire/rim damage or bad handling. In your ...


0

The largest tire you can run on a bike is determined by several things: Frame (If it rubs on the frame when you're riding it, you're going to ruin the paint on your bike and the tire) Brakes (If your brakes can't clear the tire, you have a problem) Rim Width (If the rim is too narrow or wide for a tire, you can have increased chances of rim/tire damage or ...


0

No, it is by no means universal. Frames are built with a maximum tire size in mind. Some bike include a maximum size in their specs, so you might check to see. Otherwise, it is easy enough to figure out. Since you have tires on the bike already, you can check the existing clearance and get a very good idea of what will fit. Start by measuring the ...


2

The sounds you heard were the spokes unwinding as the pressure in the tire relieved some of the tension in the rim. As you tighten the spoke nipples the spokes tend to "wind up" due to the friction between the threads in the nipple and the threads of the spoke. If the friction is high enough (old corroded spokes/nipples or a lack of lubrication on the spoke ...


1

Most likely situation is the wheel isn't full seated in the frame. With the bike standing upright on the ground loosen the wheel bolts and lean a bit on the bike which will force the wheel all the way into the dropouts. While still leaning on the bike tighten the wheel bolts. Be sure to alternate bolts when tightening. A lot of times people tighten one side ...


0

Is the axle flush in the frame/fork? Do you have rim brakes? If the rim is old and the brake surfaces already quite abraded, inflating with high pressure or installing a wider tire could have broken or deformed the rim walls. Was the the wheel true (i.e. no wobble) before? How much wobble are we talking? 1mm? 5mm?



Top 50 recent answers are included