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4

Is this for a group of riders or just one rider? I'll share the experience I had from a big group cross-roads biking event I was part of as a Cyclist, so you can take ideas and maybe create a better plan for yourself. We were going to cycle across country from north coast to south coast. So first we departed from the country's capital city towards the ride ...


3

There are multiple types of valve extension: The extenders you have relocate the valve core. The other kind are a plain tube which tapers with a similar profile to a normal valve, and screws onto the valve, over the existing valve core. Once the tyre is inflated you can remove the extension and tighten the valve-lock-nut.


3

I would suggest your frame may be a bit small for you. I'm slightly shorter than you and I have a Scultura 906 in a 54 cm frame (size on the frame sticker says S/M). The longer stem may assist, however it may put you in a more race position which could lead to the neck pain. As for the calf cramps this could be a couple of things; 1) seat height too low, 2) ...


3

As I've said in other answers, the right tire pressure function of you and your bike and your terrain. You'll have to play with the tire pressure to balance the ride quality.Just because the tire says pressure x on the sidewall doesn't mean it makes any sense running the tire at that pressure since it might just give a bouncy ride which compromises your ...


2

Except in a few cases, like on highways where you shouldn't be riding anyway, most places don't have minimum speed limits. So I don't see why it would be illegal for a car to travel at the same speed as the cyclist, as long as they are a safe distance behind. The other option is for them to drive ahead and wait for you to catch up. You should agree on a ...


2

Both bicycles have similar components (the Gravity slightly nicer drivetrain, but with a cheapo looking seatpost, etc) and are manufactured in similar facilities in China or Taiwan. The Trek will be set up and fitted by your local bike shop, which will be very helpful if your local bike shop is competent (some aren't). The Gravity will be set up & ...


2

You could try adding sealant to your tubular tire. Tufo Tire Sealant, Stans's No-tubes (and other tubeless sealants) can be used to deal with small punctures. Most recommend not using the sealant as a preventative measure, but more so as an after the fact solution to quickly fix punctures on the road. However, Tufo Standard tire sealant says that it can ...


2

Yes, absolutely. Spend an extra 20 dollars on good tires and you could save yourself 30 dollars worth of tubes. Plan on spending somewhere around 40 to 50 dollars a tire. Even if tubes were free, the money is worth saving the hours spent on the side of the road dealing with flats. Look for tires in the 'training' or 'commuting' category, for extra puncture ...


2

Its extremely unlikely for an inner tube to just burst. It sounds like you are suffering from punctures. There are two types of puncture; the first is an object penetrating the tire and inner tube, and the second is a 'pinch' puncture where an impact causes the inner tube to be pinched between the tire and rim. Many bikes (even expensive ones) come with ...


1

I also would recommend finding tubes with valves of the correct length. However, if that fails, I've had success using a presta to schrader adapter. Often with shorter valves, there won't be enough room to attach a pump head, but there will be enough to attach an adapter, which you can then use a pump that works with schrader valves. Most pumps have the ...


1

Yes, better tires can help prevent punctures. It has already been mentioned that there are tires specifically made to enhance puncture resistance. One thing that has not been mentioned is that better tires also have stronger sidewalls to offer more tire support when going over bumps and thus better protect against pinch flats. (Once, I had a cheap tire with ...


1

If you dont have much experience with a bike setup and maintenance, then get a old-stock bike from a local shop. The amount of money you will pay extra will be equal to the money spent for putting the online-bought bike together. Also local dealer will be able to find you proper bike size - just because you are X inches tall, doesn't mean you should by ...


1

It will likely work fine and you wouldn't need additional hardware so long as your skewer has enough extra space to accommodate the extra width of those mount plates and still secure snugly. As far as what you need to be aware of, I'd be conscious of how often you remove your rear wheel. If you do so with any frequency, this could be a nightmare. I have a ...


1

Main diference is tooth count, and that imposes differences in deraileur dimensions. As other answer mentions, gear range is wider in a MTB, so the rear deraileur has to be able to take-up more chain slack. A longer cage solves this. As long as they are designed with the same cable pull ratio, they are compatible, you can esaily fit an MTB deraileur to a ...


1

The main differences to the drive train is the length of the rear derailleur arm. MTBs have lower and wider spaced gearing which means the rear derailleur has to handle a bigger span in chain length. A MTB typically has a large chainring with 42 teeth and a small one with 22 and a rear cassette with 12 - 28 tooth span - so the chain has to fit both a 42+28 ...



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