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15

You'll need to very carefully inspect the area around the boss that's been ripped out, as well as your usual second hand frame check. If the bike was ridden after the damage cracks could easily have spread and you might be well on the way to a two piece seat tube. This groove could be the start of a problem, but it's probably just a scar from where the cage ...


11

The issue with having brake levers which have travel that ends very close to the bars is that, as the brake pads wear down, the brake levers will hit the handlebars before the brakes are fully engaged. This can be mitigated by regularly inspecting your brake pads and adjusting the brakes to compensate for normal pad wear. You could have them that close if ...


8

The first question is "is the handlebar actually bent?". Brake levers/shifters are just clamped onto the bar, and the clamp may have just slipped. It's not clear from the angle of the picture that the bar may be fine but the clamp on the brifter slipped. You can peel back the hood (back to front) and adjust the clamp if this is the case). If it is the case ...


6

Consider the scratches as war wounds. They're only cosmetic, but they show you ride; that you're not a cycling poseur. If the scratches really bother you, consider bogging it with automotive filler, then file and sand to shape, and paint. It will add grammes of weight though! As for adjusting the hoods, you need a 5mm (maybe 4mm, maybe 6mm) hex driver ...


6

As usual, Sheldon's got the answers. ISO 622 is the unambiguous way of referring to the following rim sizes: 700c (you see this marketing on road, hybrids; this is from the French system; the c is often dropped, but there are rare a,b sizes) 29"x decimal (you see this on mountain bikes; usually only applied to wide rims) 28"x decimal (particularly in ...


5

Looking at related discussions on reddit it seems he was using a "old style" down tube shifter instead of one on the brake lever. In the photo, you can see the shifter close to his left knee. There are other photos showing the same set-ups.


5

Likely two things. Bearing seals will slow down free spinning. In actual use the added resistance from the seals is minimal and the seals ensure the bearings remained greased and in good working order despite the weather conditions (e.g., from dry and dusty, to wet and gritty). SPD-SL are weighted so that the single sided pedal platform faces you (i.e., ...


4

No, the cable pull is different between 8 speed and 10 speed. You will need to exchange it. There is a detailed explanation here, but the short version is that there are no 8 speed rear derailleurs that are compatible with 10 speed shifters, or vice versa.


4

Your technology is up to date. 53x12 is basically still the standard for road bikes today. If you want to increase the gearing, your best bet would be to install an 11x cassette, if not a Sram 10x. That said... If you are regularly finding your 53x12 too low it means one of three things: You are mashing (standing up in a heavy gear) instead of spinning (...


3

An 11 speed rear cassette gives you more linear gaps between gears. It doesn't necessarily give you higher or lower gears. There are bigger chainrings than 53 tooth, but they're rare, expensive, and tend to be single-speed track bikes. There are smaller cassettes than 12 tooth, 11 is the lowest you can get normally, and some folding bikes can go down to 9 ...


3

We don't usually supply lists of resources here, because they don't really fit with the general SE question-with-one-best-answer approach. Interest in retro bikes and cycling gear is at an all time high, and so is the amount of information available. I'm answering because I hope to give you, and others who end up here, an example of how this information ...


3

I would try reinstalling the drive side and non drive side cups to the frame (to keep the spindle centered). Then I would recommend a game of whack-a-mole on the spindle with a rubber mallet. I have often had to remove a crankset this way. A rubber mallet should be in pretty much any home mechanics tool kit. The rubber mallet has almost no chance of ...


3

I was able to get the collet off with some gentle tapping from a screwdriver and a hammer. The collet is a soft metal, my screwdriver definitely made a mess of the metal. If someone in the future has the same problem, use some sort of hard plastic to buffer the hits. I did try to bash it out by reassembling everything and applying wood + hammer to the ...


3

From the first picture, it looks like the shifter has been knocked out of position but there's no damage to the bars themselves. If that's the case, it should be an easy fix. A good bike shop wouldn't charge much to put it right. The scratches on the shifter are only cosmetic, and I'd be surprised if it was cost-effective to replace the parts unless you (or ...


2

Well, it'll depemd on how the narrower tyre sits on the rim, specifically whether a 25mm tyre will be wide enough, but as long as this is ok, you should be fine. Be aware that wider tyres will have a larger surface in contact with the road, and therefore more grip, but if you're happy to trade that off, go for it.


2

Yes, you will need to have a road bike in order to properly train for a Triathlon. The ergonomics of a road bike a totally different to a mountain bike and you will therefore have to set aside some extra time for your body. You may at first feel discomfort when riding as you won't be used to the bike, but that'll go away very quickly. As to whether you ...


2

Why do you want the bike? If you just want to have it in your collection, go for it. If you want to ride that bike fast and long, look for metallographic laboratories in your region. No one knows why the boss was ripped off. There are several methods of non-destructive fractography and they are able to assess the structural integrity far better than you or ...


1

Changing to an 11 cog on the rear will certainly give you a higher gear. I found 9 speed Shimanos in 11/21 and 11/23 easily. I didn't find any road cassettes that had a lower low gear. I also found mountain bike versions with much larger low gears, but you probably need a new derailleur for them.


1

Your rear freehub or freewheel is damaged and/or needing service. The mechanism that engages when you pedal forward, then releases to spin/idle when you are not pedaling or pedaling backwards is broken. Much of the time these are not serviceable, or are damaged beyond service once they are spinning forward freely. If you have a freehub, you will most ...


1

No. it won't shift correctly - SRAM must be used with appropriate SRAM levers, Shimano with compatible Shimano levers, Campagnolo with compatible Campagnolo levers. Each manufacturer has their own ratio for cable recovery to derailleur movement, each company has their own strategy for coping with the fact that the angular movement of the chain sprocket-to-...


1

From what can tell from the photos it looks like the inner race is seized to the crank axle. When you removed the non drive side bearing did the ball bearings fall out? You can try to carefully cut the race off with a Dremel with a cut off wheel. You must be very careful not to go too deep and hit the crank axle. I would cut 9/10th of the way through. Then ...


1

Are you referring to the way the seat stays bow inwards asymmetrically when looking at the bike from the back? If so, it's intentional and part of how Cannondale implements shock absorption on their road bikes. The seat stays flex to absorb shocks and are not symmetrical because of the space taken up by the cassette on the drive side.


1

No there is no good seaonal time for a big cut on prices for a bike. That said, there are sporadic sales and Trek hacked the prices on the ALR Emonda by $300 bucks. That was Trek's, not the LBS, doing. What you can do to compensate is go in with a list of things you would like a discount on alongside the bike. The margins on the bike itself are very low. ...


1

No, you do not need a road bike to train correctly. What speed you travel at is irrelevant to the training effect, what is important is the duration and intensity of the workout. It is very common practice for cross country (XC) mountain bikers to do a large quantity of their aerobic base training on road bikes. And likewise many road pros choose to do ...



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