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12

I think the terms used here are a bit confused. Rather than saying that a road bike has 22 "gears", you should be saying that it has 22 "speeds" (or more correctly, as pointed out in the comments, "gear ratios" is the technically correct most accurate term (when people say 'gear', they are using it as short for 'gear ratios')). Even that can be a bit ...


10

It depends on how the fork is engineered for safety. While its plausible that the curved shape does add to some shock absorption, that is determined by the width and construction of the fork tubing. You could design a fork which was reliable and curved in aluminum or carbon or whatever, but the engineering wouldn't be the same as a steel fork. Whether the ...


8

Other? I would not count protection as the first. The cage is a lever and some edges. A water bottle is not exactly an impact attenuator. And you have the chain ring to get past. You pretty much only see a third on touring bikes. It is the least convenient location but it is a third location. Three bottles or a frame bag and one bottle. Pretty much ...


7

Sometimes I carry a fuel bottle down there when touring. It is out of the way and if the bottle happens to leak it doesn't cause much trouble – certainly not like having a leaking bottle of white gas in a pannier…


5

The main advantage is that it gives you an extra water bottle. Being lower down means that if you are swinging the bike from side to side it has less effect - this isn't about the 1kg being part of the total 100kg rolling mass, it's 1kg on a 10kg bike when you're out of the saddle on a climb. Tourists often spend considerable effort on carrying water, ...


4

There was a questionnaire on Bikeforums on this topic and here you can see the results: Brifters - how reliable are they? 39 people gave their votes and obviously for most people brifters did not break at all. The second question is about working optimally. To be honest I am yet to see a brifter which does not work optimally. Brifters have very little to no ...


4

Shanghai Forever company ltd www.forever-bicycle.com From Time Out Shanghai There are many places across Shanghai to pick up classic Yongjiu (Forever) bikes. And from a post on JLA Forums:


4

Short answer: you multiply the number of front chainrings by the number of cogs at the back. That bike with two chainrings and 11 cogs on the cassette has 2x11 gears = 22, rather than just 11. Bike Gears Explained has lots more detail and this diagram: You can see that for each of the three chainrings every cog on the back can be used. In this case that ...


4

There are various proprietary brands of security hardware such as pinhead and pitlock. I use the former on both my bikes, for the wheels (QR and nutted), headset, saddle and seat post. Pinhead fittings at least are stocked both side of the Atlantic (I suggest with either that you buy a spare key at the same time). The bike I keep outside has further ...


3

Check out the videos on the Kurt Kinetic Rock and Roll you can definitely stand and tilt the bike side to side. Whether it would handle Andre Greipel in a full out sprint I couldn't say. It's probably one of the better options to look into.


3

I'm using a Garmin 510 along with HR strap and Stages power meter on my road bike, and even with all that data I think it still over-estimates calories burned by nearly double. I arrived at this figure based on tracking my body weight and calorie intake over many rides and months, taking into account hydration etc as well. I'm 72kg, 9% body fat and a CAT2 ...


3

You could pair a Burly Travoy with a bike suitcase if you're willing to put up with a trailer while you're touring: + The bonus is that you get to use the bike suitcase to hold all your belongings in a nice, watertight compartment while on the road. The downside is that it looks wonky. I'm not sure if the Travoy is designed for hundreds of miles of ...


3

Check your airline's policy on how bikes should be packaged, but I've managed to fly with British Airways Budapest-London using a giant polythene bag, which I just wheeled in and taped up as the front quick release had jammed. The bag itself was small enough to fit in the bottom of a pannier when folded, and doubled as a groundsheet for camping CTC ...


2

I've finally found what I'm looking for, both of which are manufactured by Ground Effect. There are two models which I'm considering, either the Tardis or Body Bag. Thanks for all the suggestions! Right now I'm leaning towards the Tardis but both fold down in to A4 sized packages which is exactly what I'm looking for.


2

This is an opinion question. But this is my take on it. I have bar-end shifters on our tandem, brifters on my race and commuter bikes, and downtube shifters on a training bike. They are all extremely reliable. The bar-end shifters that I have are indexed, but they can be adjusted to run in a 'friction mode'. That is handy for swapping rear-wheels ...


2

For those of you that want to commute on a nice bike in bad neighborhoods, let me give you a few tricks that have served me well. Replace all quick release fixtures with tooled fixtures. This is generally a small investment. Take a black marker to all component markings, making all those Deore XT's look at first glance like no-name-brand cheapo ...


2

The only one I can think of that's designed for this is rollers, but even on rollers you don't want to get too excited because it's easy to ride off them. You can also buy a cheap wind trainer and not bolt it down, because that lets you throw the bike around and the wind trainer just rattles round on the floor. There's some risk you'll roll forward off it, ...


1

I have a hybrid with a flat bar, a "FBR1 Norco". I cut down the bar length to be 18 inches (45 centimetres) the same width as a road bike handle bar. This is very short for a mountain bike, but my hybrid is for straight road, the loss of width was outweighed by the ability to tuck my elbows in for aerodynamics. I also raised my seat to get into a real ...


1

My brifters date from 1997 and are "early tech" When I got it, they shifted poorly, with a really annoying habit of changing down and then not changing back up. I blasted them with brake cleaner and various oils and fluids which helped, but the only fix was a teardown and soak the guts of it in petrol for a day, to soften the old hardened grease. Now it ...


1

The reliability depends on the quality of the brifter itself but, for most brifters, all you need to maintain, adjust, and them and keep them in good working condition is a hex key set, some spray degreaser, and a high quality grease. I use mostly sram brifters and they just work when they are set up right. To keep them in good working order I remove the ...


1

Does this frame have mounting points down on the rear dropouts? The sort sometimes used for mudguards/fenders, which can be repurposed for the downshafts of a rack. Since they hold most of the weight, a front mount is relatively lightly loaded. I made a couple of clamps out of thin sheet metal for my rack, which wrap around the seat stays and bolt ...


1

Your simple answer is essentially correct. A hydraulic system is going to maintain a pretty constant mechanical advantage and frictional losses will be trifling. So 8/7 more force on the rear will provide identical torques on each wheel provided the pad friction response is linear, As pointed out, identical torques won't mean much as each wheel is under a ...


1

To help you answer your first question, do you think i can beat non fixie bike with this or should i buy new bike? Leave your current geared bike in one gear combination for the day and see if you like it. Ride a route you're familiar with and know your average time. Ride your bike in this one gear combination, did you beat your time or was it ...


1

I would highly advise to just get a cheap second hand bike and a good lock. A new bike is the main target for casual robbers which are the most and there isn't much you can do against professional ones(who go for expensive stuff manly in order to sell in pieces). So getting a cheap in first place and second hand(dirty old looking) in second place will make ...


1

This has to be a dup. First step is get the cheapest bike that does what you need. One it is a lower theft target and two if it gets stolen it hurts less. Buy used. Single speed is cheaper, less to steal, and rear wheel is already semi secured. This is my $400 used city commuter - add $80 big u lock. Just remove the front wheel and lock it all to ...


1

This is a service recommendation and is not going to help our American readers, but... airshells.com rents bike transport cases on many European airports, including Dublin. So, you ride to the airport, pick up the case there and check it in. At destination, leave it at left luggage office - which costs some money but saves a lot of hassle. I rented a case ...


1

These BR-650 is related to the old Ultegra 6500 Series. Unfortunately, Shimano did not continue with the updating of these long-reach road caliper brakes, if not, there should be the BR-680.



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