Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Astra was the Beacon Cycle house brand, according to Sheldon. As @Blam and @Daniel R Hicks say, it's a mid-range 80s bike (that's a compliment)! The lugs, while nothing special, aren't drainpipe thick - this is a good thing. It was probably built well. Crankset may be Stronglight, and the derailleur and front mech are probably Sachs-Huret. Basic components ...


9

Aside from n+1, the other honest answer is: as many as your spouse will tolerate. I have six (two road bikes, one mtb, two folders, one English cruiser). I have met the spousal tolerance factor. After this, I can only replace, not add. So if I really want that Brompton, one of the folders has to go. Now, your question doesn't also get to another important ...


8

If you have n bikes, n+1 bikes is the right amount of bikes to have. ;) Realistically, I think 2 or 3 is adequate - a cyclocross or non-racing road bike can do the first two tasks (road ride + commute) provided it has rack and fender mounts, and one mountain bike is likely good enough for the trails in one's area (if you go somewhere else where another ...


7

I'm not sure that anyone is going to be able to give you a definitive answer... especially since you are asking if your commute will improve by 30 seconds when the commute time you give has a range of 60 seconds. But 30 seconds out of 17.5 minutes is about a 2-3% improvement, which seems reasonable... The more interesting question would be "what can this ...


7

Having a Felt F75 myself, I would recommend the following upgrade path from stock: Clipless pedals They take some getting used to, but behold the extra power and comfort! Tyres (and tubes). Vredestein Fortezza Tricomp or similar lightweight folding tyres will give noticeably better grip than stock equipment. Latex inner tubes will smooth the ride and ...


6

I won't give my own question the check. I have a few bikes and I see a bike I want and I am going through the can I justify to myself. How many is too much? If you don't have room to store them safely and sheltered then too many. If you are not going to maintain them then it is too many. You can't afford it. When do you need more than one bike? ...


5

Believe it or not in the range of lengths you are looking at there is very little scientific support for there being any real discernible differences in performance (both in absolute power and metabolic efficiency). For the lengths you are considering I would suggest this is largely a personal preference choice. Crank length and maximal power If we are ...


3

You've lost the derailleur hanger mounting nut. Don't worry, they're dead cheap. Without it the hanger won't stay in place without the wheel nuts done up tight. You can get away without one (see matt's answer), but it's not ideal. It's better and less fiddly to use a proper mounting nut: The way you've set it up now is totally wrong - the ...


3

That configuration is quite dangerous and clearly wrong. Do not ride the bike like that. Do not just tighten the nuts. I can clearly see the outline of where the derailleur was previously mounted. The derailleur should be mounted in a similar position. The small screw hole is a mount point for a carrier, which is probably why you cannot get things back how ...


3

On the original question As requested by the OP original question, the downsides of a road bike include: Road bikes typically have tire widths that are not oriented towards getting to work with extra items on your bike, comfortably and with minimal distraction. Depending on what the route is like, narrow tires are bad for commuting because: Narrow tires ...


2

I've been researching the same thing. Even built my own tool of sorts by drilling two holes through a wrench and inserting drill bits to act as pegs. The wrench is about 6" long and there's no hope in hell either of the "washers" are going to come off. My experiment didn't mess up the holes but I'd say there's a good reason for 6 pins on the Mavic 670 key. ...


2

Other answer is good - I got pulled away before I could finish this post I have nice day bike and a rainy day bike and they have less difference than those two bikes and pick up more than 30 seconds on the about the same commute even rainy bike on a nice day Factors: Overall bike weight Aerodynamics The drop bars reduce wind resistance More efficient ...


2

Three things to check: 1, Is the bead seated correctly. It's pretty common to get tyres blowing off the rim if they're not seated correctly. That said, this usually leads to an exploding tube rather than the tyre just coming off 2, As Daniel R Hicks said, are the rims so worn they're expanding? 3, Check the rim for dings and warping as Malarky sort of says, ...


1

Would you really want to ride on these tires that are falling apart? You need new tires. You may have to order. Biketiresdirect.com has 27s. Make certain the rim has no defects that prevent the tire bead from holding. Make certain the tires are seated all the way around the rim (pay particular attention to the area around the valve) and the tube is not ...


1

As seen from earlier answers, there is a great deal of variability in the design of both road and hybrid bikes, such that the definitions overlap quite a lot. Perhaps the most common difference is that "road" bikes typically have drop handlebars and "hybrid" bikes typically have flat bars. So maybe the question boils down to which bar style is better for ...


1

Many bicycle chains use different platings for the inner and outer links. Inner links are typically plated with a nickel/Teflon surface. Outer links will only get a nickel plating. The extra Teflon coating helps the inner surface of the chain glide over the cogs on the cassette. Here is a video of the manufacture process: ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible