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15

A (decent) bike from the '90s would not be significantly different† from (a decent) one only a few years old except for a small weight difference and possibly lacking brifters, which are de facto standard on road bikes these days. This statement is of course excepting top-of-the-line superbikes made of carbon fiber and dragon's blood. Check it for stuff ...


14

They're trying to sell you stuff. More expensive stuff (have you looked at 11 speed consumable (chain+cassette) prices vs 10 speed?). I would not bother upgrading. As groups go to higher and higher speeds, the older stuff gets pushed down to lower component levels. So today's 11 speed 105 group will be next year's (or likely a few years later) Tiagra ...


9

There's a whole sport - cyclocross - that involves riding road bikes off road. Typically the gearing is a little lower than a stock road bike, and these days a lot of them have disk brakes. Most will take fairly wide tyres, 38mm is not out of the question. For riding a stock road bike off road, I'd look mostly at tyres. If you can find some that will clear ...


7

This picture shows a slightly better angle. You need to first loosen the lock nut slightly, then spin the adjuster barrel until it unscrews right off the threaded rod on the chain. When you re-assemble you reverse that, and have to re-adjust the tension so that it shifts properly.


5

Bilateral asymmetry in pedaling is well-known and long-studied. You can see the abstract of a review of what is known about bilateral asymmetry in running and cycling here. During cycling, bilateral pedaling asymmetry is common, and not fixed at a particular split: it varies with cadence, power, duration, and your ride goals. Another article that is highly ...


5

Doing it like the first picture shows is definitely not a good idea. The strap should be the other way round with the buckle as close as possible to the pedal's body. Reason 1: it can be tightened by pulling the end up and released with a the flick of the thumb on the buckle. (The reason for this black plastic end of the buckle) Reason 2: The end of the ...


4

The best way to improve at riding is to ride -- but many people do have limitations on their time that make it difficult to ride as much during the week as they would like. At one end of the spectrum, there is some amount of almost all fitness-building activity that is transferable to cycling fitness. Cycling is mostly an aerobic sport, so vigorously ...


4

Yes - visibility is everything for both the rider and the surrounding things. Here's an example of a road bike in traffic. The effect is exaggerated because camera is on handlebars, but even at head height I didn't see her till the camera did. You can see my body position by the shadow on the left side. Its New Zealand ...


4

Being seen - the higher you are, the more likely you will be seen over a roof top. Clearly some cars are too high or too low for it to make a difference, but the odd car is at a height the difference might be significant. Seeing - in an aero position, its harder to see as much as in an upright. It can be done by actively looking around, but its harder - ...


4

Put some reasonably durable 25c or 28c tyres on and you should be fine. Also think of gearing ... trails can get steeper than road and traction can degrade quite a bit, requiring shorter gear ratios.


4

In poor country, there is not "nice pave road" and "special cross country bicycle", cyclist just use their bicycle as daily utility tools and no complain. As long as you are not playing extreme (e.g. play the downhill) . If you are worry about comfort, punctured, then change to wider tyre, use puncture resistant tyre, good double wall wheel rims. All the ...


3

@errantlinguist gives some excellent points, but I have a couple to add. Make sure you have 700C wheels not 27" wheels. I have only been able to find a single tire in my LBS to fit 27" wheels. As @errantlinguist mentioned, biffers. This is a huge regression. To the extent, that it changes the way the entire bike feels. I have switched to flat bars ...


3

There are a lot of factors that go into your speed and efficiency, and this switch touches several of them: Rider Position: Typically, a bike with touring geometry will have a slightly longer wheelbase, and lower bottom bracket. Along with other geometry tweeks, the result is that on a touring bike you are likely to be in a slightly more upright position, ...


3

Those are called gumwalls. With this keyword you can easily search for them. Brands I see mounted on my friend's bikes are the likes of bontrager, panaracer, schwalbe, but Id say that most tyre manufacturers have a gumwall offer.


3

To the last question, a far better order of doing things would have been to disconnect the shifting cable first. The knurled part at the end of cable rotates on the threaded piece at the end of the chain, visible through the hole in the wheel nut. Rotate it to disconnect the cable.


3

It's possible that during cleaning a grain of sand, for example, has become stuck in the chain causing a stiff link which does not travel cleanly over the cogs. Cleaning chains and cogs often involves a significant amount of moving dirt around before extracting it. A simple test for this is to move the chain through both hands bending every link. You'll ...


3

The short answer is no. The SPD-SL 3 bolt pattern is larger by several centimeters. An SPD shoe has tread to make it easier to walk in the show off-road and a smaller, 2 bolt cleat mounting pattern. The tread would be in the way of mounting the SPD-SL cleat.


3

If you've managed 200 km without problems you can also ride 300 km. As usual don't ride too fast and keep yourself well fed. 1st big leap is usually between 400 km and 600 km, because after 400 km you will (typically) need to sleep.


2

This is apparently an informal race where you can set your own rules. So as suggested by criggie in the comments you might be able to agree a rule against drafting. In time trials, riders set off at one minute intervals, and drafting is explicitly banned. If one rider is close behind another I think the rules say they have to either back off or overtake. ...


2

There are a few possibilities here: 1) Cleaning the cassette took away the gunk keeping a slightly worn cassette from showing. If you use the middle gears most, they may be more worn than the rest. Unlikely, but not impossible. 2) You bent the derailleur hanger or derailleur cage when removing or cleaning. More likely than #1, and easy to test. 3) Check ...


2

This is one of the most common questions from people new to racing. I notice user Rider_X has not responded (yet). If he does then it will be well worth reading. This anwser is drawn from my experience with intense weekly endurance competition (squash), people who race bikes (father, brother, a dozen regular riding buddies, including several at the elite ...


2

It will need much work and VERY hard to find parts, been there done that after my nice bike was stolen with a crap lock. Just get a UBERKILL LOCK. The thief will not want to mess with your bike and just go to the next lock he sees.


2

I don't know of a scientific study directly answering this question. In leu of empirical (and verifiable) information, I provide an theory based on anacdotal experience. You generally use your dominant hand more off the bike than the non-dominant hand. If in your work or other activities you have poor posture or poor ergonomics your dominant hand may ...


2

Panaracer Pasela PT are an excellent road/light touring tan sidewall tire, but they're lighter than the Marathon, which is more of a heavy duty loaded touring/urban tire. There's also the Rivendell Ruffy Tuffy, which are decent but I like the Pasela PT more. The Black/Tan version of the Michelin World Tour is in the same genre as the Marathon but not as ...


2

I am speaking from far more MTB experience than road, but road is similar. Front wheel slide tends to be is more severe than rear, in terms of recover or non-recover outcome. Novices instinctively shy away from the front, sit upright and lean back when things get tight, unloading the front wheel and inducing a front wheel slide - the worst thing to do. ...


2

He is right. 1) in cycling, weight is distributed more on the rear wheel (70 rear-30front approx.). So even assume that both wheel is at the same leaning angle, the front would lose traction first (friction proportional to reaction force). This is because the front wheel has less 'grip' limit than the rear wheel. 2) When rider starts to corner/or correct ...


1

This is exactly how mountain bikers achieve greater "stickiness" in sharp turns. Unweighting briefly just before a turn, then loading through the turn can increase traction briefly since there is more downward force on the wheel. Dynamically moving your weight to achieve greater performance is a much overlooked aspect of cycling. It's less useful in ...


1

I expect that when you try to turn the nut you'll rind that the round bolt head is eccentric on the bolt. Side on it looks like the sketch below, and means the bolt won't rotate once it's in the hole. This is quite old school, and they're very easy to manufacture with only fairly basic hand tools. Imagine trying to cut a hexagonal hole into a pedal using ...


1

Yes! Go for it. What's the worst that can happen? If you don't finish, then you know that you're pushing your limits, and you will have learned more about how to do it better next time. Just make sure you take enough food, some warm/dry clothes, and you know where the bailout options are. I reckon that if you don't know all the answers in advance, ...


1

Increasing stamina and cadence cannot be trained at the same time. Why not try going to work on your bike instead? It will help you keep fit and it is also a logical thing to do since you do have a nice bike. Plus it will also cost you less than buying ankle weights. For that is already a win-win situation. Or if you don't want to do that. Maybe a bit of ...



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