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10

Astra was the Beacon Cycle house brand, according to Sheldon. As @Blam and @Daniel R Hicks say, it's a mid-range 80s bike (that's a compliment)! The lugs, while nothing special, aren't drainpipe thick - this is a good thing. It was probably built well. Crankset may be Stronglight, and the derailleur and front mech are probably Sachs-Huret. Basic components ...


6

If you ride further or faster than you're used to, then some weariness in the legs is normal and should pass within a couple of days. I rode my biggest ride to date a couple of weeks ago and when I got home I nearly lost my balance walking around the house as my legs were a bit weaker than I expected. With a couple of days rest they were back to normal, ...


5

Aside from n+1, the other honest answer is: as many as your spouse will tolerate. I have six (two road bikes, one mtb, two folders, one English cruiser). I have met the spousal tolerance factor. After this, I can only replace, not add. So if I really want that Brompton, one of the folders has to go. Now, your question doesn't also get to another important ...


5

While not disagreeing with the first answer above I think there are a few more complexities that haven't been addressed. Changes in bike technology are not linear but rather generational. Component improvements don't happen each year but rather every 3-4 years. Aside from pro and sponsored riders most riders would not see any value in replacing a bike for ...


4

Great answer from James, let me just add a really quick tip. Before you go and read 1000 articles about riding position, just try the following: Raise the saddle a tiny bit. Most people ride way too low, and that just leads to knee problems if you start riding greater distances. I know it made a huge difference for me. Increase the cadence so you never ...


4

If you have n bikes, n+1 bikes is the right amount of bikes to have. ;) Realistically, I think 2 or 3 is adequate - a cyclocross or non-racing road bike can do the first two tasks (road ride + commute) provided it has rack and fender mounts, and one mountain bike is likely good enough for the trails in one's area (if you go somewhere else where another ...


3

I won't give my own question the check. I have a few bikes and I see a bike I want and I am going through the can I justify to myself. How many is too much? If you don't have room to store them safely and sheltered then too many. If you are not going to maintain them then it is too many. You can't afford it. When do you need more than one bike? ...


3

To use cartridge bearings, the hubs must have been designed to use them (absurd kludges aside). Your hubs will almost surely be classic cup-and-cone hubs, and those will need replacement bearings. However, do note that the proper number of bearings for a hub is not necessarily a number that completely 'fills' the cup bearing race. You might not be missing ...


3

Those tires should work just fine. Any of the MTB slick tires listed on that site would work well with your bike and current rims. You can get too small a tire on too wide a rim, but it takes a much bigger jump than from 2" to 1.5 or so. There is a very conservative guide on Sheldon Brown's bike pages. http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html Given your ...


3

On the original question As requested by the OP original question, the downsides of a road bike include: Road bikes typically have tire widths that are not oriented towards getting to work with extra items on your bike, comfortably and with minimal distraction. Depending on what the route is like, narrow tires are bad for commuting because: Narrow tires ...


2

According to Shimano's website, they are non-series components. However, some websites such as this one claim they are Ultegra quality (This wouldn't surprise me with Colin's answer). In any case, none of the Shimano long reach calipers are part of a series anymore. That being said, TRP (e.g. RG957) among others still make high quality long reach calipers ...


2

Actually I think you will find they are Ultegra, circa something like 2009. Since the technology trickles down you will find that they look like modern 105's. Take a look at the CRC product listings for examples of both the modern Ultegra and the old BR-650. http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/brakes?f=2259 Note: the 2009 is a guess based on ...


2

No, these brakes have nothing to do with Ultegra. A lot of unscrupulous Ebay sellers put unrelated keywords into the title to get more search hits. It's against Ebay rules, but it's pretty widespread, unfortunately.


2

These 38/50/60/88 numbers are the 'depth' of the wheel's aerodynamic rim, in millimeters. Let's take 38 for example. This means that from where the tire meets the wheel, the rim extends an additional 38 millimeters towards the hub. When you see 88, that means the rim extends 88 millimeters from the tire. Why does that matter? One of the biggest benefits of ...


2

Derailer adjustment is easy - at least in theory. When it comes to fine adjustment you may find that you cannot easily get this problem fixed without making something else worse - i.e. its a compromise. Its a good opportunity to learn how to adjust derailers- make adjustments slowly, one step at a time, and count the turns so you can go back to the start if ...


2

Pretty broad but it has not been shut down Components High end road bikes are marketed to racers. UCI and other racing organizations have rules on what can and cannot be on a bike. Biggest changes will come from rule changes. UCI allows electronic gears. There is currently a minimum weight for road races and pro level bikes get under this limit so there ...


2

Generally when new there is room for about half a ball additional in the bearing race, but very quickly wear of the cup makes it look like a ball is missing. And a ball bearing assembly can function reasonably well with 2-3 balls actually missing (though this will cause faster wear). The usual technique, when you don't know for sure if any balls have been ...


2

You've lost the derailleur hanger mounting nut. Don't worry, they're dead cheap. Without it the hanger won't stay in place without the wheel nuts done up tight. You can get away without one (see matt's answer), but it's not ideal. It's better and less fiddly to use a proper mounting nut: The way you've set it up now is totally wrong - the ...


2

That configuration is quite dangerous and clearly wrong. Do not ride the bike like that. Do not just tighten the nuts. I can clearly see the outline of where the derailleur was previously mounted. The derailleur should be mounted in a similar position. The small screw hole is a mount point for a carrier, which is probably why you cannot get things back how ...


1

I like @DWGKNZ's answer, especially where he's saying about things tending to move forward in big bangs, rather than some gradual linear progression. You will of course find small-scale enhancements year-on-year, but these would not be big enough to convince you to get a new bike, say. I just wanted to add something about hydraulic brakes. But also I'd say ...


1

If you have a cup-and-cone hub, you need the loose bearings. These are some good directions on doing the replacement. See these links as well for some useful tips.


1

Measure the inner diameter of the headtube, both upper and lower. These are the key measures in combination with the fork dimensions. You probably want to confirm that the angle of the inner chamfer angles are 45 degrees (and not 36) as well. Once you have those measurements you can start searching. Note that it says "integrated" (= IS) on the Aventon page, ...


1

I've been researching the same thing. Even built my own tool of sorts by drilling two holes through a wrench and inserting drill bits to act as pegs. The wrench is about 6" long and there's no hope in hell either of the "washers" are going to come off. My experiment didn't mess up the holes but I'd say there's a good reason for 6 pins on the Mavic 670 key. ...


1

I have now had a road bike for 3 days since i transferred from mountain biker to road biker. I've done just over 50 miles and my experiences so far would be both bikes have pros and cons. The mountain bike is a LOT slower. The width of the tyres being thicker means more surface contact with the road and it slows you down and requires way more effort to ride ...


1

These 38/50/60/88 numbers are the 'depth' of the wheel's aerodynamic rim, in millimeters. Let's take 38 for example. This means that from where the tire meets the wheel, the rim extends an additional 38 millimeters towards the hub. When you see 88, that means the rim extends 88 millimeters from the tire. Why does that matter? One of the biggest benefits of ...



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