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6

A CX bike is stable, strong, and will take wider tires. It is a great road and commute bicycle. It is built to race in city parks. It has a comfortable riding position. Just put touring tires on it (I like 35mm). I don't mean to advertise a bike but if you look at a high end CX like Moots the even say use as light touring. Rout You are not going to ...


5

A lot of causal riders appear to prefer SPD's, which is a great place to start, but I here is the argument for SPD-SL like systems. Which I personally prefer and even on dirty muddy roads. Road bike specific pedals (e.g., SPD-SL) are designed for a single purpose, road cycling, and the pedals do this job well. Road cycling has a lot of repetitive motions ...


4

First, note that if you're new to clip/clipless systems, it takes a while to get used to it. A lot of non-racers prefer mountain bike clipless pedals (e.g. Shimano SPD) since you can clip in on both sides of the pedal and the shoes often allow the cleats to be recessed (so you can walk around). Mountain marketed shoes generally tend to be more comfortable ...


3

Take it to your favorite IBD- they can explain and illustrate much better. They might even show you how to do a destructive freewheel removal! Since bikes age in "dog years", and the correct tool to remove it (thick -boss Shimano) hasn't been made since the '90's), your shop may not have the correct tool unless they have been around for a while. IBD ...


2

There are (generally speaking) four types of modern bike cranks: single, with one front gear; triple, with three front gears; standard double, with two front gears, and lastly, compact, which is a double with smaller diameter chainrings. The difference you are describing is between a standard and compact double. A standard was once 52 (or 53) paired with a ...


2

Note that riding in the wet is generally more risky than riding in the dry since things are indeed slipperier than in the dry. Relatively innocuous things in the dry become hazardous in the wet regardless of your tire type (such as wet leaves). Wet also is accompanied by oil in many cases on the road, especially if rain hasn't washed the oil from the cars ...


2

As all the comments have stated most appear to be brand/ model specific. Since it is an older frame it is possible that it didn't have them. Some older frames snaked the entire cable housing thru the frame. The stop was on the component, (brake, derailleur or frame mounted cable stop). If you search for custom bike frames builders you may find some local ...


2

Look at the angle of the guy's back, that's the key to why they say that. For performance, the back will be in a more horizontal position. You need to be careful, though, how much faith you put into this sticker - if at all possible you should try both sizes and judge for yourself. Also, don't forget that different frames, with different geometries and ...


2

This question explains that if you travel on uneven ground, your average speed drops. This is because you spend more time in the slow climbs and less time in the fast descents.


2

The danger of this is your rim may begin to rub the brake pad – especially when you put in hard out-of-the-saddle efforts. In theory, if your caliper has become off-centre then one pad will have come closer to the rim and the other will have come further away. You should simply be able to push and rotate the caliper by hand back into a central position ...


2

http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/support/faq/question/what_are_the_differences_between_all_the_materials_you_use_in_your_frames/ This link might be helpful. It describes only two grades of alloy for their current bikes. The higher grade being hydroformed. Hydroforming allows profiling and shaping of the tubes. Its comparative to blow moulding. With respect ...


2

It sounds like they compare very directly with other manufacturers who list the alloy and butting, except that Trek doesn't release that. My guess is that some of those descriptions actually overlap and are just marketing hype that changes every couple of years. Your best bet would probably be to contact Trek directly and and see if they will "translate" ...


1

You're basically going to have to do destructive freewheel removal on that. As for which freewheel to choose, check the threading when you get it off, and buy a 5 speed freewheel (chances are any 5 speed freewheel you have is ISO threaded and will probably work). The only company that I know of that still makes them is Sunrace.


1

The optimisation of speed for a given course profile, environmental conditions and rider's physiological capability is a multi-variable optimisation problem. Factors include: the physics of cycling, with the proportion of energy demand from the various resistance forces varying depending upon gradient and wind conditions, as well as a rider's morphology, ...


1

I think the trainer Frederic Grappe (FDJ team) had a good answer. He would rather an uphill and downhill into the wind than a flat into the wind because you would waste more effort battling the wind compared to the hill. Otherwise on a circular course flat will be quicker due to frictional losses on the slow climb and increased wind losses on the descent.


1

I know you are going to doubt this but the average of 10 and 30 is 15. Assume a 30 mile ride at 15 mph for a total of 2 hours. Now 15 miles uphill at 10 mph for 1.5 hours and 30 mph downhill for .5 hours for a total of 2 hours. Wind resistance hill versus flat c is constant a is frontal area Wind resistance is proportional to the velocity squared ...


1

Isn't standing out of the saddle for a hill less efficient than riding on the flat (assuming someone less than a seasoned pro)? Sheldon says so. If so the average efficiency is worse on the hilly route and for the same input it would be slower. Of course as the hills become less steep the efficiency tends towards the flat case - there may be some sweet ...


1

It doesn't matter a lot if it's slightly off. But you should be able to center the calipers by hand, even after the mounting bolt is tightened. Just grasp the two brake arms firmly and rotate the entire caliper a bit (with no pressure applied to the brake lever). In my experience this is usually sufficient to get the caliper centered enough. Riding for a ...


1

You may consider contracting some custom frame builder, if you shop around you could get custom frame set in range of $2k maybe less, which would leave you $1k for rest of the bike . A quick google search showed some builders even locally in Pittsbourgh, although it is often not necessary that they are located in the same town.


1

Just about to ask a similar question, and figured I'd give you what I know so far. I'm 6'8", more torso than legs. 36" inseam, 37" sleeve in dress shirts. Trek 1.5 is the low-end Trek road bike, aluminum frame, and comes in a 64 or 65cm setup. I have one. It works pretty darn well, out of the box. Both Trek and Specialized make bikes in this size, but ...



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