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19

Since you say you're looking to become a triathlete soon it's far too early to be thinking of advanced training aids like power meters. The first few things to do (not necessarily in this order) are join a tri club enter a triathlon or two join a tri training squad observe your (comparative) strengths and weaknesses get a well recommended triathlon book. ...


13

It's doable although it doesn't make sense from a cost perspective. Only do it if you have an emotional investment in the bike or want a fun project that will teach you a lot about bike mechanics. To give you an idea, I bought a 1975 Peugeot UO18 Mixte (a woman's road bike, perhaps similar to your mom's) that had been stored in a barn and turned it into my ...


12

If you are riding near your aerobic limit you'll definitely discover that you've lost aerobic capacity during the next 12-24 hours. It can take that long to replace the red blood cells you've lost. Since a blood donation is about 10% of your blood capacity, your aerobic capacity will be down by 10% I wrote the rest of this before I saw your comment that ...


8

As already said, aerodynamics are less important to MTB's, but otherwise its largely convention and fashion that dictate what people wear. A vast majority of MTB'r are not wearing basic shorts - they are usually wearing shorts made for riding, including padding just like Lycra road shorts, flat seams and materials designed to withstand the rigour of riding. ...


7

It is not allowed by UCI rules, but comissars usually allow it if it is due to mechanical reasons and used to get back to the peloton, since they have discretional ability to decide. Time penalties or disqualification if used to gain advantage over the peloton. So, rule enforcement may vary depending on many circumstances, and I guess they don't want to lose ...


7

They do help with training and racing but they are also very expensive. As you say you are a beginner I imagine increases in fitness/strength (and therefore speed) are going to come fast anyway, even without a power readout to base training around. I would definitely invest in a HRM though and make sure the bike computer you use has cadence as well as ...


6

Depends on exercise intensity. In a day or two you can return to your normal/moderate exercise. A complete recovery of oxygen delivery can take as much as 3/4 weeks. This means a professional athlete should be careful because he will loose performance, but us normal human beings can carry our normal daily lives. You can read more complete answerers given ...


6

From what I've read, adding a power meter betters measuring HR only, for some reasons: Heat, diet and stress can affect your HR. A low HR might be an indicator that you are in good shape. You can have a high HR and your power output be low An increase in power implies better performance, but an increase in HR does not necessarily. So it is good to combine ...


5

Yes, absolutely. Clothing is mostly an issue of personal preference. Performance fabrics and things like spandex don't make that much difference for short stretches, and their advantages become more pronounced and valuable the longer you ride. 11 miles is somewhat of an intermediate distance; in regular clothes you'd be totally fine, assuming that the ...


5

Those guys seem to use basic shorts of one type or another Most (at least those who pedal more than 5 miles per ride and have been riding for more than 1 year) use some form of spandex with padding below the shorts. that catch air Doesn't matter. and might catch on branches. Doesn't happen. The hands and elbows in modern MTBs are very very ...


4

They last pretty much forever provided they haven't been damaged (e.g. punctured or rusted or something), so go ahead and use them. If you really want to check them, you can buy a few new ones and weigh them on a scale (and compare the weights of the old cartridges to the new ones). If they're significantly lighter, they've leaked and throw them out. Else, ...


3

This is not really an answer, but it's too long for comments. @Daniel has given some good starting points. For a bike of the vintage, Richard's Bicycle Book by Richard Ballantine would be a good bet, and is available second hand. When you say rusty, do you mean the frame, or wheels, handlebars, brakes, pedals, etc? The way to approach such a project ...


3

You've chosen a non-trivial project. If the bike has been unmaintained since the 70s it's got several things wrong with it from the git-go: The tires are rotten The brake blocks have hardened into concrete The grease in the bearings has dried up Further, finding parts for a bike of this age can be a challenge. But if you really want to learn how to ...


3

From this question and the other regarding clothes, I think that you would be better off showing the bike or bikes you are referring to when using the term "road bike". Possibly you are not talking of a road bike like this: Because it would be just a waste of the money invested in weight reduction / aerodynamics to use it in plain clothes and with a ...


2

Compare the relative position of the flat bar and the saddle on your current bike. (ie. is the flat bar higher/lower than the saddle ? How long is the stem? ) When you demo road bikes, check that the top of the drop bar is at least close to the same height wrt to the saddle as your current flat bars. Drop bars aren't that big a change, but you have to ...


2

I have a 28-mile round-trip commute that I do from 3-5 days per week. The trip is a combination of suburban streets, paved bike path and city streets. I used to do this on a hybrid with a flat bar. Last fall I swapped for a road-bike with drops and haven't looked back. One of the biggest advantages drop-bars give you over flats (aerodynamic ...


2

By order of magnitude if you mean by a factor of 10 then most likely yes. You have wind, rolling, and gradient resistance. It is going to be spot on for gradient resistance so if you have a hilly ride it will be more accurate. Clearly it does not account for wind. I expect it assumes a mid level road bike on decent pavement. At speeds over 10 ...


2

Tires can make a significant different in terms of comfort, especially on uneven roads. If you're comparing two different bikes, ask what is the largest tire that either one can handle. I used to have a road bike where some 25mm tires rubbed on the front derailleur clamp (a tire labelled "25mm" is not always 25mm wide). With that bike I didn't have a ...


2

The one thing I always say to people in your situation is to remember that we have all been there. And the saving grace here is that by the time you get to buy your second bike, you will know exactly what to look for. With that in mind, you might want to think about limiting what you spend on your first bike. But for the moment... For your suspension and ...


2

8.5 or 9bar is a usual maximum recommended pressure for road bike tires (23mm width). Depending on your weight and demands on comfort something between 7 and 8.5bar is usually right. Just be aware that road bike tires lose pressure pretty fast so you have to refill them every week or so. They should feel very hard at 8bar. If you can pinch them it’s way too ...


2

I would try riding 11 miles in these pants once, and as long as you haven't experienced any discomfort from riding this distance without spandex shorts that contain a chamois pad, you're unlikely to experience much discomfort as you ride more often. However, bike shorts are crafted from fabric made to resist pilling from the friction created when your rear ...


2

Yes, it will affect you, but I doubt you'll notice the difference. Some people do feel fait afterwards, but I believe this is related to blood pressure rather than red blood cell count and your body can replace the fluid relatively quickly, so have a cup of tea and a chat before you leave and you should be ok. When I was giving regularly, they asked if you ...


2

Some old wheels do not have a hook to hold the tire bead, which limits you to around 70 PSI. Straight wall or a slight flare, doesn't matter, 100 PSI is not doable without the hook, afaik. (Wikipedia says the hooks were invented in the 70s) In my experience, the tire will come off within an hour or two, and the tire will pop off with a bang as the tube ...


1

There are essentially no rides that are 'unimpeded by pedestrian or car traffic' around Brooklyn, because Brooklyn is on a densely-populated island adjacent to another even more densely populated island so there's no nearby countryside, and we still use our rail lines very heavily so there are no rail trails. The 30-miler I've found with the most 'open ...


1

You choose a non-trivial project. Lots of good tips have been given, but I must warn you: restoring an old bike is not a to-do list like I have seen here. It's not like maintaining a new one. There are all sorts of difficulties with old, seized components, that will be a pain to unmount, and which will require a careful evaluation before rebuilding. If you ...


1

It depends on your objective. Are you doing it to save money, or because you want to ride this bike? You can do it, but unless you are attached to the bike there may be a better option. My wife and I got back into riding last year, dusted off our late 70's ten speeds (2 by 5, not 10 at the rear), got a tuneup from the local bike shop including new brake ...


1

What’s your seating position? I guess you are sitting pretty upright. I doubt this seat will work with the stretched and deep position on a road bike. Especially when using the drops.


1

There is no substitute for riding a few different bikes to feel the difference. To get to do this, you'll need to develop a relationship with a local bike shop (LBS). A good LBS will let you take a bike for a short ride, and some will hire a bike to you for a longer ride. Explain what you want and what your budget is. Be up front that you're checking out ...


1

I have a Garmin 800 which includes heart rate in addition to speed and elevation. Heart rate tells it what my actual level of effort is, so that should take wind and all those other variables into account. It also knows my age, gender and weight, so with all that data it should be able to estimate calories burned pretty closely, or at least as closely as is ...


1

It depends what kind of lock you have. If it took a thief a failed attempt I assume it's a good one, so take it to a locksmith or anyone with power tools, preferably with a proof of ownership of the bike. The harder it is to destroy, the more convinced you should be that you should buy the exact same lock again :)



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