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10

Google 'cyclocross'. The primary difference between a road bike and a CX bike is the size of the tires. You can ride your road bike anywhere your skills will allow. There are some gotcha's though. Skinny tires only have so much traction. Gravel flats won't be an issue for all but the lightest of race tires, but pinch flats from hitting larger rocks at ...


9

As other answers and comments have indicated, you can successfully ride a road bike on loose gravel. There are five main factors, and they are all interconnected: The depth of the gravel. The key to riding in gravel is smooth lines. Avoid sharp turns: the deeper the gravel, the more your front wheel digs in and accentuates any steering movement you make. ...


4

Can I calculate (approximately) how much air pressure is lost by measuring the hose length and diameter? No, you cannot tell how much pressure is lost based on the size of the hose. This is not because there is not enough information to tell but because the hose is irrelevant. You seem to be under the impression that there is some total amount of ...


4

There are interrupter levers such as the Tektro RL720 pictured here (courtesy of Rivendel): You will need to redo the cabling, but standard V-brake levers will not work for a variety of reasons (handle bar diameter (conceivably, you could shim it on, but this doesn't seem very safe) and amount of cable pull (which you could solve with a travel agent, but ...


3

There is a map maintained by a Bike Radar person https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF&msa=0&msid=113029186218946556099.0004785d476236cd4866c&dg=feature


3

In all seriousness the only places I can think of where I've seen cobbles would be town centres. If you do a search on Google Images there are some stories dated 2013 which have images of the cobbled Market Place in Beverley - ironically the story there is that the council wanted to tear them up for health and safety reasons. I'm pretty sure I once rode ...


3

A reasonable estimate can be found using a site like Bicycle Blue Book. This site is a database of used bike sale transactions going back for almost a decade, and has a number of pretty obscure manufacturers listed. You can even add upgrades you have made from the stock and get an estimate of how that changes the value, though it doesn't account for things ...


2

You are asking two questions, one about the bike and one about the tires. Road bikes can easily go on gravel, or even off road. However, the ride quality and handling will be compromised the more "off road" you go. As far as the tires, the more you have "road" tires, the more flats you will have. This is due to the thin nature of road tires for less rolling ...


2

Those paving stones look fine - you could take just about any bike along them. it's worth considering that there are bike races on far worse pavements - the Paris Roubaix famously. So you don't need to worry about that. I would say that the bike you linked to in Decathlon is also a hybrid - it's not a 'road bike' in the traditional sense, which would ...


2

I thought this was an interesting question, so first of all, +1. First off, the sloping tube (your second image) is known in cycling parlance as a compact frame. I found an article on the Giant web site about the advantages of a compact frame. When I say "advantages" - this is Giant's word not mine! The full article is here, but to summarise it: the ...


1

I'm not sure how much of this is marketing, but I believe the main reason is comfort. The longer seat post has more flex to absorb bumps and the seat stays being lower gives the rear triangle more flex too. Another advantage is a lower stand-over height for bikes with high bottom brackets.


1

Get used to riding a drop bar bike as it is before you make this sort of change. You will probably find that you can amble along not working very hard with your hands on the tops, but when you want a bit of power, keeping your hands on the drops is suddenly much more comfortable, powerful and efficient. (Back injuries may change this, making the "drops" ...


1

"Standard" brakes is not a thing. Can you be more specific? You imply you want to replace the brake levers with a different style, such as those designed for flat bars, but you provide a photo of road calliper brakes as your replacement. Are we talking about the brake callipers or the levers? As Batman points out, there are issues (though not ...


1

Potholes cause impact punctures (also called pinch punctures or snakebites) when the force of an impact is sufficient to compress the tyre all the way to the rim. Options to reduce the risk: Increase tyre pressure Reduce impact energy by reducing weight or reducing speed Use larger tyres, which would increase the distance between the rims and potential ...


1

I went to take pictures of the BB installation as @Batman suggested. After removing the crank arm, I actually noticed an offset of 1-2 mm on the drive side, like @mattnz anticipated. However, I also noticed that there was a gap of about 1 mm between the frame and the BB lid: After this observation I googled a little bit, and learned from this forum thread ...


1

The bicycle blue book does not include a Gudereit, which is a German brand. It seems to miss information about a lot of European brands and models yet. Sometimes a sticker on the frame indicates the build quality. There is a sticker just below the saddle and on diagonal tube almost entirely at the front if I see it correctly. If one of those says something ...


1

This started as a comment but I must be in a wordy mood this morning - here's a suggestion and a few things to consider. First though, when it comes to brand, any of the "proper" brands would do, it depends what you're comfortable on. For multi-purpose use I recommend a hybrid with flat bars - but add ergo grips and/or bar ends. Hybrids generally have rack ...



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