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3

A couple of tips I learned when winter commuting in Calgary: Depending on how much salt gets used on the roads where you live, using a good quality car wax on the frame will go a long way towards rust prevention. A squirt of WD-40 on your chain, cable pivot points, etc. will displace any water that's collected there. Keep your chain well lubed with a good ...


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The spring tension of front derailleurs is not normally configurable. Addressing your difficulty shifting up, have you checked whether the High limit screw is preventing the mech from moving all the way, forcing you to stretch the cable until the shifter reaches the ratchet point? The shifter is normally able to freely pull cable slightly beyond the ...


3

I would say that whether a bike is Unisex (men's) or women's specific it is of fairly little relevance. What matters more is an individual's fit on an individual bike. Tall people need big bikes, short people need smaller bikes, regardless of gender. As it says here: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/h/option/bikesizeguide#women-bike A women's bike is built to fit ...


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I sold Specialized bikes for a lot of years, they do make gender specific frames, women's bikes have shorter top tubes relative to the seat tubes, this is because women on average have shorter backs and longer legs than men do, they also come with womens saddles, and sometimes women specific grips (for feminine hands). The Sectour is considered a men's ...


3

It's almost certainly a Gran Compe SHOT LEVER two handle brake lever. This description matches quite well and there's some comments on Bike Forums. Simply, both levers operate the same brake, but on a narrow bar where you don't have room for two levers for two brakes it's a good compromise.


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A decent disc system is quite expensive - you need disc ready hubs, disc ready fork+frame and the actual disc brakes. A cheap/medium cost set of rim brakes (V-brakes) will typically perform as well if not better than cheaper disc brakes (and the maintenance is not hard). Thus, budget minded people should avoid disc brakes. As for building a bike piece by ...


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Couple of points:- Firstly, yes they are compatible. Yes they do shift better of standard cables, this is due to cable drag. Cable drag is basically the friction between the inner and the outer. This friction causes slower and less accurate shifting. The polymer on the inner decreases the coefficient of drag between the inner and outer, this increasing ...


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Motorcycles are mostly used for media (video and photos) and sometimes for support (they can have a limited number of wheels; I'm not certain if they are "neutral" or team specifics. The motorcycles will be mixed in with the cyclists; the drivers are highly skilled. The cars are for race support; there are team specific cars with spare parts and ...


2

As a general answer to this kind of question, I recommend that you buy from your local bike shop. While shops can vary, if they seem to provide reasonable service and the price is reasonable, it's worth buying from them for several reasons the profit on your sale will help them stay in business - so they will be there when you need service. many shops ...


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This could be coming from the bottom bracket, which will make noise when worn out and pedalling under load. One way to test this is to stand beside the bike, grab one crank in each hand and see if they can be rocked towards/away from the frame. There should be no play in this direction. This is described with pictures here. If that's not the problem, then ...


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You may not need to get a professional bike fit to fix the problem, and the problem may not be fixed by a correct bike fit. If you do not know what the fitter is doing, be prepared to spend $200 for not much improvement. The comment by @Neil "Research bike fit yourself and adjust your bike accordingly. It won't be as good as a pro fitting, but it's ...


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If you are having pain and riding a lot of volume, it makes sense to get a fitting. Your other options are to continue to experience the pain, possibly doing long term damage to your health. reduce your volume of riding get a different style bicycle with a more relaxed and upright geometry. Your fitter may recommend this anyways.


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Hubs/Bearings Clean and repack your bearings every fall. Most bicycle greases are fine for low temperatures, but if you are biking in sub-zero temperatures you may want to look at a product like Lubripate Mag-1 which is rated for use in temperatures down to -60 degrees Fahrenheit. If you are biking in wet conditions as well as cold, you may want to clean ...


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The convoy of team cars driving behind the riders are there to provide support to the cyclist, like food, clothing or mechanical assistance. The sequence of the cars is determined by the ranking of the riders, e.g. the general classification in a stage race. During a race riders will drop to the back of the bunch (peloton) usually to collect new bottles ...


2

Looking at the BLB Mosquito it is marketed as a "race" saddle which in the world of leather saddles seems to be short hand for narrow with the expectation that your cockpit setup has lots of handle bar drop (handle bars below saddle). Depending on the width of your sit bones, these saddles can be uncomfortable in a more upright position, as I have learned. ...


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I don't know anything specifically about this model saddle, but all leather saddles share the same group of strengths and weaknesses. Leather Saddles have a few drawbacks. They require a break in period. They require regular maintenance, more so when used in foul weather. They tend to be heavier than most current saddle designs. There are mixed reviews ...


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If your GPS bike computer doesn't include a map[1] and you're navigating from a topo map, having the elevation can be very useful for making route decisions. In the bad old days before ubiquitous GPS, by far the most useful navigation tool in the mountains for me was a barometric elevation watch. That and a topo map was my go to tool 90% of the time. Of ...


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The main reason to avoid a triple is ego. If you have any, you don't want one. If you are less egocentric, and ride in a place where low gears matter, then by all means consider it. The weight doesn't mean much (without the ego related stuff), and there are darned few people strong enough to ride up serious hills who don't also have egos to match that ...


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First, if you're a Clydesdale then you should probably have a triple. But overall, the advantages of a triple are: A triple can spin up an elevator shaft. Gear changes are more natural and accurate. Your legs will spin out before the top gear does. In practice, a triple has a better chainline. A triple is kinder to your knees. The advantages of a double ...


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Be careful with overinflation, as while rolling resistance drops with increasing pressure, there comes a point when further increasing tyre pressure begins to dramatically increase rolling resistance. Often this is around the point of the tyre's maximum rated pressure, although it can be less than that depending on a few factors. Here is an article that ...


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All things are not equal. In particular, the load on the rear tire of a road bike is about 60% and on the front it is about 40%. Nor do all riders+bikes weigh the same amount. A 250 lb ultra-Clydesdale might not even want to ride on 21mm tire, let alone ride on it and inflate it up to the sidewall maximum. If you do overinflate, you will get a rock hard ...


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The other answers rightly point out that being able to pull up on peddles can help improve power output but completely overlook low speed bike control. To help with balance when the bike is stationary it is very useful to be able to pull the forward pedal up just slightly and apply a tiny amount of pressure. This can allow you to stay clipped in and ...



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