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80

2016 Update Disc brakes are now common on road bikes, even racing road bikes in the professional peloton. Most of the major bike manufacturers offer disc and non-disc options for most of their bike models. Some "endurance", "adventure", and "cyclocross" (drop bar bikes sold under "road" category, but intended for some off-road use) models only offer options ...


47

In road racing there are lots of way to try and gain an advantage (or not to give others an advantage). Because this is a friendly race, I will break it down into friendly, indifferent and hostile tactics. Update 1: The OP updated their question to make it clear that they were a beginner and the other rider was a more experienced road rider. So I ...


43

The short answer is: not that difficult. The long answer requires some explanation. The equations of motion for a rider on a bicycle are well-understood if not always well-known. The power needed to propel a bicycle on firm flat ground (as on a velodrome) varies approximately with the cube of speed. Thus, to double your speed, you would need to increase ...


42

You can absolutely ride road on a cx bike. Many of the components are actually road components, including the wheels, so slap a pair of 700x23's on the stock wheelset and off you go. Things to consider: 1)Cross bikes are going to be a little heavier than a road bike in the same price range- probably a couple to a few pounds. Ultimately not that big of a deal ...


40

Keep it Simple Not everyone knows how to setup and maintain disc brakes. I know that it does not take a lot of work to read the manual but people sometimes prefer to stick to what they know and are hesitant to purchase a bike they do not feel they can confidently work on. Flawed Technology Disc brakes are far from perfect. We all should know that the ...


39

Do yourself a huge favor, inflate them daily. As they are high pressure and low volume they tend to lose air quicker than that of a tube that is low pressure and high volume (MTB). With daily inflation checks you will vastly reduce the instances of pinch flats, which IMO are typically the result of too low pressure. Butyl tubes, the typical tube, retain ...


38

Reference - Cyclecraft by John Franklin A cycle takes more than twice as far to stop using only the rear brake compared to using only the front brake, which will usually stop the machine just as quickly as using both brakes. Nevertheless, you should always apply the rear brake, and slightly in advance of the front brake, so that a slight skid at the rear ...


38

The fork is fitted the wrong way around. The brake caliper should be in front of the fork, not behind it. The way it is, the bike will be very, very hard to ride because of the negative rake, making it very nervous. The negative rake is also the reason for the pedal overlap. Normally, you should at most get some toe overlap. Loosen the bolt in the top of ...


35

Michelin says this for road bikes:


34

The tread on a road bike's tires is really quite unimportant and purely cosmetic. Road bike tires have tread patterns because they sell better, not because they perform better. Here's some questions to ask to decide about replacing a tire: Can you see any of the fabric? Are you getting flats more easily than you used to? Is any part of the tire bulging ...


33

Gabe, If you love the frame, and are willing to spend the money to keep it, start upgrading everything else. Start with: Wheels/tires - rotating mass will slow you down the most - go to aluminum wheels and thin/light tires size 23 or 25. Bottom Crank - Once again rotating mass, you can get some hollow core cranks, and adjust the chainring sizes to the ...


33

On my reasonably flat commute I average around 16 mph on my road bike, but your average speed is dependent on many different factors. A general rule of thumb is that if you are switching from a mountain bike with knobbies to a road bike you will be between 15-20% faster at the same watts/effort. Typically that's only a change of 2-3 mph. I teach a bike ...


31

They're fine. I live outside of Vancouver so I'm already riding in wet a few days a week some weeks. Just this morning I was coming down the backside of a climb at 70km and they were totally secure. Since the tires are so narrow they don't suffer from hydroplaning. The biggest thing to worry about is painted lines and manhole covers (or other metal covers ...


31

A mountain bike will never really be a road bike. The geometry and construction of the frame is different. Mountain bike frames are designed for a different posture and are often designed for a suspension fork, as well as generally being beefier. You can set up a mountain bike with slick tires and drop bars if you want. I've tried this before and the ride ...


30

To be honest, I think you handled the situation pretty well as it was. You've got to get yourself to the bottom of the mountain safely and even in locales which have laws about deliberately impeding following road users you will have to allow people to pass in a manner safe for you, this isn't necessarily going to be immediately. Seems to me that this ...


30

Road Road bikes are designed for performance on (mostly) well paved roads. They are the lightest weight of the 3 categories, have the shortest wheelbase, lowest bottom bracket, and the steepest headtube angles. These geometry features allow the bike to react to rider inputs quickly and to have a low center of gravity which is beneficial when turning. ...


29

Disclaimer: I am a fixie hater. I'll try to answer this as if I was impartial. Proper road bikes (Including the Moulton) are the machines for speed, and always have been (unless you're on a velodrome). Looking at it through a speed lens, a fixie has a slight weight, aero, and drivetrain efficiency advantage over a road bike, but this usually doesn't come ...


27

The key to understanding your situation is its unusual nature. Speed on hills is mostly determined by power-to-weight, while speed on the flat is mostly determined by power-to-aerodynamic drag. The problem is that speed in head winds is also mostly determined by power-to-aero drag, so the conundrum is why you're good in head winds but not on the flat under ...


27

How long a tire lasts depends on a number of factors, including what type of tires you ride, how much you weigh, the conditions you ride in, front vs rear tire, etc. In general, a good set of tires will last a couple thousand miles. When the tire is totally worn out, you can usually see threads beneath the rubber in places. Alternatively, the tire may ...


27

Years ago when cars started to get ABS, the argument was that a skilled driver could stop quicker with it turned off, and there was proof of it. When Traction control came in a skilled driver could go faster with it turned off. When ESP became available, ditto. We all know that an unskilled driver benefits enormously from these aids, and it turns out not ...


27

This is not an either-or proposition. Your bike is hitting the bumps and supporting your full weight (minus the very small proportion of weight that might be falling at that exact moment) regardless of how you stand when you hit the bumps. The difference is whether you're going to let the additional damping effects of the down tube, seat tube, bottom ...


27

It can be considered "impolite" by roadies, but not because of the bike you were riding or the fact you didn't take a pull (although I am sure some will argue for this). The main reason random drop-in riders are generally frowned upon are because of: the dangers associated with unpredictability of a new rider lack of insurance coverage Potential ...


26

All other things being equal, run them as high as the tyre manufacturer recommends (there will be an advisory notice on the tyre wall). For most tyres of even medium quality, this should be at least 100psi, if not 110; higher end tyres might go up to 130+. (I generally inflate both tyres to similar pressures, but I think that there are some theories that if ...


26

Rob, you are correct that a heavier bike will give you a greater fitness benefit over the same distance. The only real counter-point I have is that the most effective bikes for fitness are the ones that get ridden. So, if some reason a lighter bike would more fun or appealing to you (while still be a "good enough" commuter), than a lighter bike could be a ...


26

Please accept my apologies on behalf of cyclists. Hollerin' something at a motorist who was trying to figure out how to handle an obviously unclear situation was inappropriate. Thanks for doing your best and not killing any cyclists that day! In general, I agree with the other answers here that you handled this fine and there isn't some magic you could have ...


25

Check out this link for a recent post by ex frame-builder Dave Moulton about disc brakes. He discusses the reverse-directed stress to the spokes due to disc brakes as a potential problem. He also points out that the standard caliper brake can be viewed as a disc brake with a much larger diameter disc (the rim) and without the problem of transferring the ...


25

You're talking about a "bunny hop" and it can be done at speed on a loaded bike but it's high risk. You'd almost certainly be better off jumping off the bike and rolling. US Bike Trials call it a "side hop", but in anglonesia I've mostly heard it called a bunny hop. Here's a photo of the 2006 Cycle Messenger World Champion doing more or less that at about ...


24

Yes, all bikes could ride on roads. However, a road bike is one that's optimized for riding on smooth pavement. It usually has skinny tires (no wider than 32mm, often much narrower) with a very light tread. (If they have any tread at all. Some road tires, such as the Kojac, are treadless or "bald", to cut down on rolling resistance.) Road bikes usually have ...


24

The question of big box bike quality to one side, the question should be not whether it's "appropriate" to ride this bike, but whether you like it. Are you physically comfortable riding the bike? If so, great! If not, there are several questions here about bike fit that may help you get comfortable on the bike. A bike that doesn't fit you will never be a ...


24

As you're in Ontario the following references are official. Look at the picture at the bottom right of Toronto's Understanding Bicycle Lanes -- here's an excerpt: In summary, stop behind or pass to the left of the turning car. I generally expect drivers to see what's happening out the front of the cars, but never expect them to know what's happening to ...



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