Hot answers tagged

23

As you're in Ontario the following references are official. Look at the picture at the bottom right of Toronto's Understanding Bicycle Lanes -- here's an excerpt: In summary, stop behind or pass to the left of the turning car. I generally expect drivers to see what's happening out the front of the cars, but never expect them to know what's happening to ...


22

Once the other car is in front of you generally the law and the legal system both suggest you need to give way to the car. In some places motorists technically need to give way to cyclists in the same lane or a bike lane, but that's something that the court will decide after the fact. It's IMO rude for a motorist to overtake you then turn, but it's going to ...


21

The key point here is that 90% of drivers immediately forget about any vehicle they've passed, unless it has bright flashing lights. The diagram you have added shows that you're behind, and in the driver's blind spot. Attempting pass on the inside is now to attempt suicide. The only time it's reasonably safe to pass on the inside is when the traffic is ...


19

250 miles is nothing. 2500 miles is also pretty much nothing -- this is under a year's worth of riding for many people. Many people still ride (and buy) bikes which are ~30 years old, and probably have 25000 miles or more on them (and will ride them for many years to come). You can look at the model number (and compare it by year to which model year it is)....


16

There is no real problems other than things getting scratched or broken being shuffled around, derailleurs easily get caught on seat belts etc. There is however a very easy and affordable option to avoid this. (Assuming you have QR skewers) Install a 2x4 or similar piece of wood. Then mount QR truck mounts to said 2x4. If you are going to be using your SUV ...


11

You basically get what you pay for, so there isn't any secret formula. Trek is one of the largest manufacturers on the planet, and is probably as good as any other on the market. But have a look at, and test if possible, other bikes as well as Trek, because different models have different geometries, and another geometry might feel better to you. Size also ...


10

There's a whole sport - cyclocross - that involves riding road bikes off road. Typically the gearing is a little lower than a stock road bike, and these days a lot of them have disk brakes. Most will take fairly wide tyres, 38mm is not out of the question. For riding a stock road bike off road, I'd look mostly at tyres. If you can find some that will clear ...


6

For the UK there are traffic statistics available. This graph from the 2015 Road Traffic Estimates shows the general trend for cars. There are detailed tables of traffic flow available. There is also geographical data available in the form an interactive map. This isn't broken down by time of day, but should give you an indication of which roads ...


6

There's a short answer to your question and a longer fuller answer. The short answer is that a common standard for road cranksets is 130mm BCD (bolt circle diameter). The smallest inner chainring you can use with 130 BCD is a 39 (as Kibbee has said, technically you can get a 38 tooth 130 BCD chainring although that doesn't leave much metal between the lower ...


6

Bilateral asymmetry in pedaling is well-known and long-studied. You can see the abstract of a review of what is known about bilateral asymmetry in running and cycling here. During cycling, bilateral pedaling asymmetry is common, and not fixed at a particular split: it varies with cadence, power, duration, and your ride goals. Another article that is highly ...


6

Not really, just be careful. For example, you don't want the derailleur to hit the door or something when getting it in or out. You also don't really want to stack things on top of the bike, especially if you have no wheel in (e.g. at the fork). That being said, getting a bike in and out of a vehicle can be inconvenient, plus, it can get your car dirty. ...


5

In the US, you generally expect bicycles to get cheaper towards October/November, rather than May/June/July. Everyone wants to buy a bicycle when Spring gets nice and Summer. Then, they'll ride a few days in the fall and put the bike away in winter. So, sales tend to decline in the Fall/Winter (and the deals come out), so looking in Fall is probably the ...


5

If your bike has disk brakes and you remove the wheels, insert a spacer between the brake pads for transportation. Without a spacer, accidentally pulling the brake lever when the wheels are off will push the brake pads to together and the brake disc won't fit. It can be cumbersome to separate the brake pads. There are special spacers available, but any ...


4

Put some reasonably durable 25c or 28c tyres on and you should be fine. Also think of gearing ... trails can get steeper than road and traction can degrade quite a bit, requiring shorter gear ratios.


4

In poor country, there is not "nice pave road" and "special cross country bicycle", cyclist just use their bicycle as daily utility tools and no complain. As long as you are not playing extreme (e.g. play the downhill) . If you are worry about comfort, punctured, then change to wider tyre, use puncture resistant tyre, good double wall wheel rims. All the ...


4

This is really only a question you can answer for yourself. How fit are you? How much do you ride currently, is 11 miles a long way for you? Are you comfortable in London traffic? Is it raining? These questions, and others, you will need to answer before you get close to an answer. Personally, I'd do it, I chose 2 points on the map in London at random and ...


4

The photos I have seen on line indicate this bike lacks a frame mount for the rear brake caliper. The fork also lacks a mount. It will be most likely be cost prohibitive to attempt modifying the frame. You would need road specific disc calipers if you will be using drop bars, a disc wheelset, rotors, and cables as the old ones will likely be too short. If ...


4

My advice is, first and foremost, avoid hitting the car. Argue about who had right of way later. Irrespective of whatever the law says in your country, the collision will be decidedly more unpleasant for the cyclist that the driver. In Holland, if a driver hits a cyclist whilst turning right, the driver is liable; end of discussion. However, the law varies ...


4

There is no tool that I know of that solves your problem for you. The way I solve the problem of finding out what a road is like, is to use Google maps to find a route. then use Street View to check the roads at important points. Of course, if the road is gravel, Street View is probably not available. if the route is not what I want, drag the route ...


3

It's subjective whether it's advisable for you. I do it, but you have to think about the following things: How often? Don't jump in to trying it every day to begin with Route. To begin with, allow plenty of time for getting lost and exploring different routes. It took me at least six months to settle on a route. Luggage. I have a small seatpost rack that ...


3

Additional points not mentioned in the existing answers: Cleanliness It should be shop-clean with little road grime, and shiny chrome. However if its been hanging in a shed for a few years it will have dull chrome and a light coating of dust. The dust of storage sits on "top" compared to dirt from riding which is up underneath. Seller may have washed ...


3

You need to be very careful with the weight limit on that rack, it will flop about if overloaded a little, or break if overloaded too much. But you're riding short distances in heavily populated areas, so presumably you're staying in buildings and buying prepared food, so you don't need to carry much. If you can afford to spend a little extra money on buses ...


3

In most circumstances you should not be getting dropped by riders your weight and power. The advantage of drafting another cyclist is way beyond the differences in aerodynamics of your frame or brakes, even your position on the bike. If you have this problem in a sidewind it might be your position on the crossbike is too upright. It would seem your problem ...


3

This is Bicycles.SE, we're more aimed at helping you overcome practical problems. Since its a nice looking bike, why not fix it? Please tell us more about the problem/damage, with photos of the broken parts.


3

The graphics looks similar to a '61 Dynamax TDF edition, made by Motobecane for the Canadian market. Could be a different model year maybe? 61 dynamax decals.. Look like a similar cartoon style. Either way its pretty awesome!


3

There is a tool I know of that solves your problem: OsmAnd (available for free on F-Droid, paid versions on Android Play Store + iOS App Store). If the region has decent coverage with properly mapped highway types, the app's offline routing offers a bicycle mode + the option to avoid unpaved roads. Whether the data coverage is good enough in the region can ...


2

The first thing, you should actually verify that you do have a cassette, ond not a freewheel. Sheldon Brown's site is good here, providing photos etc.. My answer will assume that you are actually running with a cassette. The outside of a wheel is called a rim. The centre is called a hub. On your bike, bolted on to the side of the hub is something called a ...


2

Certainly can ! I did a camping tour with a road bike - with a bike rack - and tent/sleeping bag, etc - we did gravel roads - just standard road bike tyres. Next time, I might get more durable, or grippy tyres. We did 4 days of 80km (330km in total)


2

I don't know of a scientific study directly answering this question. In leu of empirical (and verifiable) information, I provide an theory based on anacdotal experience. You generally use your dominant hand more off the bike than the non-dominant hand. If in your work or other activities you have poor posture or poor ergonomics your dominant hand may ...


2

You're on the slippery slope of knock-on upgrades. Its cheaper to buy a new bike equipped with disks than it is to upgrade an existing bike to discs from rim brakes. Look for Kool Stop brake pads for your existing rim brakes, which are often salmon-coloured. They work really well, and aren't stupidly-expensive. Don't buy $2 brake blocks and expect ...



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