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6

I had the same problem as you when I bought my rollers, the best advice is to place the rollers in a door frame. Start by holding onto the doorframe and get used to spinning with one hand on the bike. You should always try to maintain a high cadence (and speed) when you first start, the momentum will help you balance. The plan is to pedal in a perfect ...


5

Why would you need chains and cassettes that cost in excess of 300 dollars? Several reasons: You're a professionally sponsored racer, money is no object and you want to cut every gram of weight possible. You have way too much money (generally, people who buy top end equipment fall into this group). It looks cool among a certain crowd. In picking your ...


4

I doubt many people would change cassette based on occasion, but I suppose it is possible - it isn't too onerous a task to swap a cassette out. But certainly I (and I suspect others too) will fit a cassette once and it will stay on the wheel for its lifetime. I think the key thing with a cassette choice is basically how close (in terms of number of teeth) ...


4

Is this for a group of riders or just one rider? I'll share the experience I had from a big group cross-roads biking event I was part of as a Cyclist, so you can take ideas and maybe create a better plan for yourself. We were going to cycle across country from north coast to south coast. So first we departed from the country's capital city towards the ride ...


4

There are a few different hand signals to use depending on what the situation is. In general, making a fist behind your back or with your elbow out and bent downward signals to other riders that you are planning on making a stop, potentially a very sudden stop for unexpected reasons; When closing in on road hazards, pointing them out is extremely helpful to ...


3

To remove the crosstop levers from the bar tops you will have to: Remove the inner brake cables Remove the bar tape Remove the brake cable housing between the main brake levers and the crosstop levers and the crosstop levers and the front brake / frame boss. Remmove the crosstop levers from the bar (they should be held on by a simple clamp with 1 allen ...


3

One option is RaceSplitter. This is an iOS app, costs $35. You will need a suitable iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch to run it on. You can enter a start list in advance. Then during the race, you just have to enter the rider number as they cross the finish line, and it will record their time. You can then publish the results on the website, and export to Excel ...


2

There are three good reasons why professional racing teams care about weight Hills Margins of victory are often VERY small Racers run in packs for aerodynamic reasons. If you can out-climb an opponent enough to drop him from your pack on a climb, then he probably won't catch up on the flat - because the he is working against air resistance and the power ...


2

I wouldn't worry too much about crosswinds with 60mm depth. Unless you are a very light rider or live somewhere really windy! Each wheelset handles crosswinds slightly different due to their shape/profile. So it's worth reading the reviews. One thing to bare in mind is what kind of riding you do and how fast you ride: If you ride in a bunch and shelter ...


2

I think this is quite a broad question, so I'll highlight a few parts of the bike: Seatposts/saddles: Probably interchangable Forks: You wouldn't want to swap them, and chances are a beefy mountain fork wouldn't go into a road frame anyway, even if you could get the right headset. Gearing: Road bikes typically have higher gearing than mountain bikes ...


2

Except in a few cases, like on highways where you shouldn't be riding anyway, most places don't have minimum speed limits. So I don't see why it would be illegal for a car to travel at the same speed as the cyclist, as long as they are a safe distance behind. The other option is for them to drive ahead and wait for you to catch up. You should agree on a ...


1

It will likely work fine and you wouldn't need additional hardware so long as your skewer has enough extra space to accommodate the extra width of those mount plates and still secure snugly. As far as what you need to be aware of, I'd be conscious of how often you remove your rear wheel. If you do so with any frequency, this could be a nightmare. I have a ...


1

Main diference is tooth count, and that imposes differences in deraileur dimensions. As other answer mentions, gear range is wider in a MTB, so the rear deraileur has to be able to take-up more chain slack. A longer cage solves this. As long as they are designed with the same cable pull ratio, they are compatible, you can esaily fit an MTB deraileur to a ...


1

The main differences to the drive train is the length of the rear derailleur arm. MTBs have lower and wider spaced gearing which means the rear derailleur has to handle a bigger span in chain length. A MTB typically has a large chainring with 42 teeth and a small one with 22 and a rear cassette with 12 - 28 tooth span - so the chain has to fit both a 42+28 ...


1

A simpler alternative would be to use inline barrel adjusters to join the two sections of outer. That would avoid having to re-wrap the bars and means you could put the levers back in if you wanted to. Just release the inner wire from the brake, pull it out as far as the interrupter lever, remove the lever, inster the barrel adjuster and re-thread. Then wind ...


1

We've used an app for android phones made by Liuto. It was great, easy to learn/use and cheap --only $1.11. Basically, when each rider goes off by start number, you tap their corresponding number on their return and the calculation of their time versus overall elapsed time is complete. Snap!


1

This advice - from above- could you get killed: Firstly your tires must be hard - near the maximum pressure written on the side wall. Riding soft tires is a recipe for death under oncoming traffic, because they don't have as much grip and just slide out from under you. It's junk from a self-appointed expert. Sorry: yes, you've cycled 50 years, but you're ...


1

This is a very interesting question. Aluminum vs Carbon. Well it be long before the two will be in the same price range - on it's way in the very near future. I have an Aluminum and a Carbon frame road bike. The aluminum bike has a longer wheelbase, more relaxed seat angle (72.5 vs 74) and square formed stays, and deflects most of the bumps and vibration ...



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