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15

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


11

You have a couple different options. I think the cheapest would be to switch to a compact crankset which would change the front chainrings from 52-39 to 50-34. I'm pretty sure you could do this while still using the same shifter. Changing the front shifter is required if you want to go from a double to a triple, as is changing the front derailleur. If you ...


8

The key point in your question is I get on the bike and ride hard. There's nothing wrong with riding hard, but it sounds like you're riding too hard for your knees to be happy. Since you like doing weights, I suspect that you like to push the pedals hard, and this is causing the problem. Bike fit issues can cause knee soreness, but they also tend to have ...


6

It is relatively simple to find parts to fit old bikes. Things have changed a lot but there are still enough old bikes out there that you will not have a difficult time getting replacement chains, cogsets, derailers, wheels, bottom brackets, wheel bearings, seat posts, stems, headsets, or anything else. Any gaps in what is available can likely be filled by a ...


6

Bicycle Helmet Suitable clothing and shoes Cellphone Whatever else you "need" depends on your mechanical abilities and how independent you wish to be.


5

Treating "competitive cyclists" as this single unified group (with three subgrouping) belies some prejudices. Like all walks of life there are a diversity of people, all with different motivations, morals and life experiences. As such there is no single correct answer your various questions. For example: are people in pelotons generally friendly, ...


5

You'll need to swap out your left (front) shifter and front derailleur to utilize all three chainrings of a triple. Between the cost of that and the cranks, I think a better option would be to swap out your rear cassette for something with more range. Since you've already got a 12-27 on there, a 12-32 would give you I believe the range you need. My hunch ...


5

At 10 o'clock there is a wedge that holds the handlebar. Taking off the plastic cap at the end of the stem reveals the bolts for tightening the stem and handlebar.


4

As far as assisting at race pace - a cadence of 90 or 100 is not a limit for an electric motor designed for it. With the dollars involved in cycling generally, and at elite sports specifically, I do not see any barrier from an electromechanical perspective. Most importantly for an elite rider, the motor can be optimised for a cadence between 85-95 - a very ...


4

I think it all depends on the use you are going to give the bike. I've owned nothing but older bikes (road) since I resumed cycling around 2006, mostly for commuting and occasional longer rides (on the lines of 5.000 km / year) and everything has been ok. What I would do is try and find some old bike that works fine, and not get into the upgrade thing; if ...


4

To me, gravel bikes seem mostly like cross bikes with a bit more money they can take from your wallet. 1) Road and mountain shifters and derailleurs don't play nice with each other at 11 speed, so this question is moot. If you want to check a particular crankset on the bike, look at the width and the type of BB setup. I don't see why you'd want to switch ...


3

Proper fit in an aerobar posture is designed to allow you to race well. In order to race well you will need to be comfortable enough to produce power, to reduce aerodynamic drag, and to handle the bike well and safely for the duration of your race. If your fit otherwise meets all your needs, you shouldn't be concerned about where your knee is positioned ...


3

I would go for a good floor pump, as I find it can be extremely important in preventing flats. One big problem I see is underinflated tires. This can cause flats and other problems like rim damage. A good floor pump will make it not so much of a chore to ensure your tires are always properly topped up. If you plan on leaving your bike anywhere except your ...


2

I'm an MTB rider who occasionally got into a Road Bike for 60 km rides. (5 hours aprox). From experience I would advise several short rides before a very long one. Ride until you feel uncomfortable and keep going for another 10-15 minutes but don't let yourself get into [severe] pain. For example: Get two 30+ minutes a week for 2 weeks, then grow to two ...


2

Cannondale with it's new Boost 148mm rear spacing standard could fit some more gears theoretically without making the chain thinner. But the real question is if more gears are actually needed. What really matters is the cassette range which is determined by the smallest and biggest cog wheels. Now we have the smallest cog with 10 teeth, and there was a ...


2

Replace "cycling" in this question with any competitive sport. How should we know if it's right for you? How should we know what the community of cyclists near you is like, or whether or not you'll get along with them? Enter a race. Did you have fun? Enter another one. Or don't. Your call.


2

Talking about science, there are two factors here: moment of inertia - smaller and lighter cogs in a compact crankset mean smaller moment of inertia, which in turn means that you need smaller force to obtain the same acceleration. In this aspect a compact crankset gives a slight advantage. Note: this parameter is practically insignificant when it comes to ...


2

The motor doesn’t have to contribute to upper limit riding. Click the motor on and spend the first half of the race freewheeling at 200W and save your legs. Throw in a change of bike then you can save weight for when you need it. The focus seems to be on GC riders using this technology for direct benefit, but the GC rider could benefit from having a ...


2

While it's true that a larger chainring will have slightly less friction and thus slightly more efficiently, it's an extremely negligible amount, that you wouldn't be able to feel. More importantly, are your crankarm lengths different on the new crankset than the old? That makes a much bigger difference. For example, if you've went from 175's to 170's, that ...


2

I just switched to a road bike from a hybrid. On my first time out commuting into work this morning I arrived in 32 mins as opposed to 37 previously. Weight is a big issue. Newton's 2nd law F= ma or acceleration = Force / mass, so if your bike is twice as heavy then it will take twice as much effort to get up to a given speed. Then you have resistance, ...


2

I've ended up with similar marks on some of my bikes that have tight tolerances for tires. Often I have found that the tire itself doesn't rub, but some of the sprues do. My fat bike in particular has a very tight rear triangle, and even with a properly dished wheel, I have to remove the sprues. As to the danger, you'd have to look very closely and feel ...


2

I've had a hardtail mountain bike for a few years, and used it for all kinds of rides -- singletrack, rail trails, roads. A few months ago I got a cyclocross bike (Norco Threshold) in addition to the mountain bike. So I'm in pretty much exactly the situation you describe. I am enjoying the cyclocross bike and I feel like it's made me about 3-4mph ...


2

Any bike can go anywhere. I've taken a road bike down an off-road course, and an electric assist road bike up a steep gravel path (not fun) My weekend ride these days is a non-suspension steel mountain bike with knobbly tyres but a smooth strip on the face of the tread for road comfort. As long as the parts work together and fit your body and style of ...


1

If you already have the usual tools and clothing you can always need more of the typical wear parts: Tires, tubes, chains, brake pads, chain oil, cables, pants … Otherwise I’d start with a proper stand pump, mini pump (for on the bike), tubes, chain tool, hex keys, lock, bottles, helmet … Clothing is of course essential but hard to guess the right size for ...


1

If you are doing exercises that cause pain in your knee, it generally could mean one of two things, your mechanics are bad and putting strain on your joint, or your joint hasn't seen such hard use and the tendons, ligaments and joint capsule aren't adapted to such use. Since it sounds like you strength train regularly, I'd guess you have a mechanics issue. ...


1

Without any inside information into the R&D efforts of Shimano, SRAM or Campagnolo, it's pure speculation at best. I assume that they are looking at the idea of 12-speed, but it'll probably be close to 10 years until we see it (9 to 10 speed took ~7 years; 10 to 11 speed took ~9 years), especially with all the focus on electronic gruppos at the moment. ...


1

The easiest way to tell is by going to a bike shop and test riding few bikes. I had the same decision to make recently (road or CX), and after test riding, I was confident I wanted to CX. The road bike was noticeably faster, but the comfort on the CX trumped that for me, and it was still very fast (33C road tires, compact gearing). It is also running without ...


1

This year (age 25) I decided to start road biking having never even sat on anything but a MTB. I got persuaded into trying out a used CX first as an introduction to a more road bike geo and soon got into it. Have since bought a road bike too and absolutely love it. I started doing 20 mile rides once a week, I wasn't getting anywhere with it, but was happy ...


1

Adaptation greatly varies from person to person - are your core muscles strong, do you have good flexibility, problem in your column/shoulders, etc. It's har dto give you an answer. One think to take into account is that most road bikes force a a hard posture on the rider, on the pursuit on speed, mainly on your low back and neck. This is true for any ages. ...



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