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7

Riding at 30kph average for 3 hours, in a hilly area is a solid effort. Assuming your pack riding skills are sufficient, you will also likely do fine in in a club ride that averages 30-40kph (but see the pack riding primer below). Club rides will have a faster pace than what you are riding now, but you will also be working a lot less (about 30% less) at any ...


7

Everything is relative. For 99% of the population 30kph for 3 hours would be amazing. For a male A grade club rider it would be an off day. For a female A grade club rider it's not bad for a solo training ride. About bunches Sometimes an ad hoc bunch forms in a popular road. These can be dangerous - you don't know the experience level of these people, ...


6

Firstly, to answer you question - no, it's not practical for me. Since this is a question of personal safety, no-one can make your decision for you. So in the rest of this answer I will try to set out the issues. It's fair to say that the issue of cycling helmets has been contentious in the past, so I'll give a recap of that. I say in the past because most ...


6

One thing to look out for is the size of the drop from the bolt securing the brake to the frame, and the brake blocks, to ensure the new brakes will fit in such a way that the blocks line up with the rims. Probably if you have a newish bike, then any new brakes you buy will be of the same dimension as new brakes. But it's worth making sure they'll fit - ...


4

Tools will be dependent on the standards of the bike. A overview would be: General bike stand grease carbon paste torque wrench Headset tools to chase and face head tube bearing press crown race setting tool steerer cutter Drive Train tool to chase and face bb bb bearing press or bb spanner chain breaker cassette tool cable cutters cable ...


3

Pretty much right -- you just have to make sure that the calipers have enough reach to brake (on an Allez, pretty much anything but a long reach caliper will work). There are some threads like this with some new Shimano stuff (new Super SLR) which is technically a ymmv/you're on your own, but it should work. Another thing you should check when replacing ...


3

Should work. Put a new chain on. New chain as a worn chain will wear the cassette as it is stretched and does not match up. If the chain is severely worn it may even jump. Chain is cheaper and should be replaced unless it is almost new. A cassette will typically last 2-3 chains. If you sometimes use 28 then why are you giving that up? Is a closer ...


3

I've built pretty similar bike recently (5800 groupset, chinese frame), here's the list of tools used: 2-14Nm torque wrench with a set of hex heads. Without it you might crush carbon fiber parts. Hex keys set. Phillips screwdriver. Used only for derailleur adjustment. Bottom bracket tool that came with SM-BB6800. If you didn't get one, make sure you buy ...


3

The most common way is to use a "Chain Wear Indicator Gauge" tool. (google for product pages). If you don't have access to (or don't want to buy) one, you can use a ruler: http://sheldonbrown.com/brandt/chain-care.html


2

Well, 105/Ultegra are pretty high to put on a BSO or BSO priced thing (and the brakes will cost more than the BSO). I'd probably go with 20 dollar Tektros. Generally, they are all short-pull brakes so you should be fine with all of them. Shimano has some New Super SLR cable pull, which you can pair with standard short pull brake levers, but Shimano wants ...


2

My first real road bike was around $1300 - so you are on the right track as far as spending. You do have to pony up to get a decent ride and components. I bought a Bianchi, and the dealer is an hour away. I haven't had any issues, but now that I look back I should have bought a bike where I live, so I have dealer support and can get parts/merchandise ...


2

Whether your numbers are descent depend on who will answer. I've never riden road so I find those numbers descent, but some people who ride road may tell you that those numbers are mediocre. If you want to find out how you compare against others (and your self) in parts of that ride I suggest that you start using strava. Used wiselly it's a great tool for ...


2

Individually tools are expensive. And some (very) expensive tools you would only use once or a few times are not worth buying. Like Park or Pedros and buy a kit. It seems like a lot but $200 - $400 is a good starter kit. Then just fill in with specialty tools or pay to have the work done. Too many people don't use a torque wrench but with nice bikes ...


2

On a cyclocross your CD (drag coefficient is not much different). You are the same basic shape. It is a little taller so you have a bit more more frontal area Are you sure you are the same weight and power? Would any of them be willing to swap bikes and test. I get dropped on rides on my street CX but it is because I am just not as strong. Based on ...


2

Bicycle helmets are certified for the types of impacts that one would encounter while having an accident on a bicycle. Motorcycle helmets need to be able to endure much more, because riders are going much faster and have more momentum should they crash. Professional road racers ride much faster than the average cyclist (25 mph to 28 mph on flat terrain, in ...


2

Yes to all the issues plus heat lack of ventilation comfort heavy and you are not sitting upright like on a motorcycle sight blocking you are in a more bent position even a mountain bike visor can block your vision on a road bike safety the weight can put more stress on your neck in a fall That said some bicycle helmets are safer than others. Not ...


2

Don't worry about equal torque. The front wheel will do as much as ninety percent of the work on a maximum stop. You will learn to modulate the rear to prevent lock-up. Equal pressure will be fine for normal stops.


2

Assuming the same force applied by the cylinder and the same materials, with the same pad size, the larger rotor will have a larger "lever arm" and be more "effective", in proportion to the diameter.


1

Rotating the post should not be a problem On the saddle there is a range on the rails that you may be past Often the range will be marked I had a rail break but I was too far back Avoid aluminum rails as aluminum fatigues


1

I ride my bikes HARD (BMX park/street/dirt) and back in the 90s we had to use what ever parts we could find. Since no one was making parts back then for BMX, it was usually MTB parts. Even back then and with all the abuse we put them through, (yes, even flipping seats and posts backwards to fit our needs) the parts seemed to hold up pretty well (Except the ...


1

Wheels generally come in a cardboard box with plastic caps over the hub ends to protect them and a bit of other padding (for skewers and the like) added in. Your LBS may have a few of these laying around for whatever size wheel you are sending back. They may even be willing to do the package job for you and save you a bit of time for a reasonable amount of ...


1

The COMPLETE set will likely cost more than 3x the cost of your frame and parts. The tool to prepare a bottom bracket is almost 500 bucks all by itself. So I'm not going to answer "the COMPLETE set", especially because your copy/paste wall of text doesn't indicate all of the exact specifications for all your parts, which is needed to know exactly which ...


1

There really isn't much required to make a MTB into a formidable city bike. The obvious thing is to change tires. But I wouldn't actually recommend to go for something skinny just something not knobby. Skinny tires offer very little advantage but absorb a lot less of the bumps encountered in city driving which makes them less comfortable and put the wheels ...


1

The Polar 200 user manual says that the speed sensor and the cycling computer must be no more than 30-40cm apart. The cadence sensor attaches to the frame, near the pedals. You could test how far away the speed sensor will transmit by just moving the computer away from the bike with the front wheel spinning. If it works at 1 meter distance, then putting ...


1

I have a fixed gear and I don't find the rear brake useless. I actually Find it quite hard to skid the rear wheel with just the pedals unless I'm riding on wet roads. Personally, I also really like riding on the hoods, and I would leave the brakes they way they are. I would also leave on the drop bar levers because getting to a mountain bike style brake from ...


1

It may not have anything to do with aerodynamics, but your gear ratio. The website for the Merida Cyclocross 3 does not list the specifications, but the Merida 4 does indicate that, like most cyclocross bikes, it comes with a compact crankset, with the largest chainring at 46 teeth. You should be able to stick with the group, but you will need to be ...


1

I am in the same bandwagon, being dropped at high speed flat cruising, though I was looking for different suspects (pedals, clothes...). For aerodynamics I would expect having broad shoulders or narrow, for instance, to have more effect than what road - CX differences can imply. Even wider handlebars would have more significance than frame geometry ...


1

Probably best to start with something mild and work to more harsh until you find something that works. It's probably also best to test in a non-conspicuous area on the same wall just in case something unexpected happens. You can start with just soap and water, and see how that does.Then try dish soap. If that doesn't work, you could try the magic eraser ...


1

The last post is correct about two meanings for compact: sloping top tube as one meaning and a compact crank (smaller chainrings) as a second meaning. A third meaning also exists - or used to exist: a bike built around smaller 650C wheels. Cannondale used to market their 650C-wheeled road bikes as compact frames.


1

I practice XC, DH, Touring and Urban Commuting types of cycling, and have been using cleated shoes since 2002. By now I recognize several advantages of foot retention systems, even thoug I haven't used pedal straps. I will share someof the advantages I have found, as I assume they arethe same as well used straps. For XC on rough terrain and DH, they simply ...



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