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7

There's a whole sport - cyclocross - that involves riding road bikes off road. Typically the gearing is a little lower than a stock road bike, and these days a lot of them have disk brakes. Most will take fairly wide tyres, 38mm is not out of the question. For riding a stock road bike off road, I'd look mostly at tyres. If you can find some that will clear ...


5

Bilateral asymmetry in pedaling is well-known and long-studied. You can see the abstract of a review of what is known about bilateral asymmetry in running and cycling here. During cycling, bilateral pedaling asymmetry is common, and not fixed at a particular split: it varies with cadence, power, duration, and your ride goals. Another article that is highly ...


4

In poor country, there is not "nice pave road" and "special cross country bicycle", cyclist just use their bicycle as daily utility tools and no complain. As long as you are not playing extreme (e.g. play the downhill) . If you are worry about comfort, punctured, then change to wider tyre, use puncture resistant tyre, good double wall wheel rims. All the ...


4

Yes - visibility is everything for both the rider and the surrounding things. Here's an example of a road bike in traffic. The effect is exaggerated because camera is on handlebars, but even at head height I didn't see her till the camera did. You can see my body position by the shadow on the left side. Its New Zealand ...


4

Being seen - the higher you are, the more likely you will be seen over a roof top. Clearly some cars are too high or too low for it to make a difference, but the odd car is at a height the difference might be significant. Seeing - in an aero position, its harder to see as much as in an upright. It can be done by actively looking around, but its harder - ...


4

Put some reasonably durable 25c or 28c tyres on and you should be fine. Also think of gearing ... trails can get steeper than road and traction can degrade quite a bit, requiring shorter gear ratios.


2

I don't know of a scientific study directly answering this question. In leu of empirical (and verifiable) information, I provide an theory based on anacdotal experience. You generally use your dominant hand more off the bike than the non-dominant hand. If in your work or other activities you have poor posture or poor ergonomics your dominant hand may ...


2

I am speaking from far more MTB experience than road, but road is similar. Front wheel slide tends to be is more severe than rear, in terms of recover or non-recover outcome. Novices instinctively shy away from the front, sit upright and lean back when things get tight, unloading the front wheel and inducing a front wheel slide - the worst thing to do. ...


2

He is right. 1) in cycling, weight is distributed more on the rear wheel (70 rear-30front approx.). So even assume that both wheel is at the same leaning angle, the front would lose traction first (friction proportional to reaction force). This is because the front wheel has less 'grip' limit than the rear wheel. 2) When rider starts to corner/or correct ...


1

The first thing, you should actually verify that you do have a cassette, ond not a freewheel. Sheldon Brown's site is good here, providing photos etc.. My answer will assume that you are actually running with a cassette. The outside of a wheel is called a rim. The centre is called a hub. On your bike, bolted on to the side of the hub is something called a ...


1

Certainly can ! I did a camping tour with a road bike - with a bike rack - and tent/sleeping bag, etc - we did gravel roads - just standard road bike tyres. Next time, I might get more durable, or grippy tyres. We did 4 days of 80km (330km in total)


1

This is exactly how mountain bikers achieve greater "stickiness" in sharp turns. Unweighting briefly just before a turn, then loading through the turn can increase traction briefly since there is more downward force on the wheel. Dynamically moving your weight to achieve greater performance is a much overlooked aspect of cycling. It's less useful in ...



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