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38

The fork is fitted the wrong way around. The brake caliper should be in front of the fork, not behind it. The way it is, the bike will be very, very hard to ride because of the negative rake, making it very nervous. The negative rake is also the reason for the pedal overlap. Normally, you should at most get some toe overlap. Loosen the bolt in the top of ...


16

Forget the tarp. Ultimately, the greatest danger to your bike is not the weather, it's thieves. As long as you invest in a good lock, practice good locking technique, and don't live in an area full of degenerates you should be fine. My bike is worth more than $1000 and I ride it all over and lock it up outside frequently. When you select your bike, don't ...


12

Every once in a while it is just bad luck. Most of the time though, if you've fitted a new tube and it starts to leak within minutes, that means you have something on the inside of your tire that is causing the leak. A thorn, piece of glass or debris, etc. Usually you can find the culprit if you very very thoroughly run your fingers along the inside of the ...


12

In bicycles, the technological advance is not as fast as you might think. This is due to the UCI, which blocks a lot of new technologies or is slow to allow them in races. So I think as long as the older bike is in good shape, there won't be much difference. Maybe it's a nine-speed instead of the modern ten or eleven, but that doesn't really make a ...


11

Road Road bikes are designed for performance on (mostly) well paved roads. They are the lightest weight of the 3 categories, have the shortest wheelbase, lowest bottom bracket, and the steepest headtube angles. These geometry features allow the bike to react to rider inputs quickly and to have a low center of gravity which is beneficial when turning. Wheels ...


11

The most important thing for a college campus (and commuting in general in places where there are a lot of potentially not nice people) is to have a cheap bike and locking it properly - in particular, one that doesn't attract attention. Old and scuffed up bikes are best for this. I think an old mountain bike or flat bar hybrid (like a 80s/early 90s ...


10

There are many causes for price difference in bikes. There are others reasons than these listed below, but they tend to fall in line with one of these four categories. Brand Branding is always a premium. As in every industry I can think of, some brands have a reputation that to some extent justifies a premium price. This reputation is based off a multitude ...


10

Google 'cyclocross'. The primary difference between a road bike and a CX bike is the size of the tires. You can ride your road bike anywhere your skills will allow. There are some gotcha's though. Skinny tires only have so much traction. Gravel flats won't be an issue for all but the lightest of race tires, but pinch flats from hitting larger rocks at ...


10

Astra was the Beacon Cycle house brand, according to Sheldon. As @Blam and @Daniel R Hicks say, it's a mid-range 80s bike (that's a compliment)! The lugs, while nothing special, aren't drainpipe thick - this is a good thing. It was probably built well. Crankset may be Stronglight, and the derailleur and front mech are probably Sachs-Huret. Basic components ...


9

First, let's answer the first to questions together, as they are closely related. Does one lean with the bike? ...and... Does the bike stay more upright? Short answers are yes and yes in most cases. To elaborate, let's take a look at what you're trying to achieve when cornering. I found this image recently and I think it does a great job of ...


9

As other answers and comments have indicated, you can successfully ride a road bike on loose gravel. There are five main factors, and they are all interconnected: The depth of the gravel. The key to riding in gravel is smooth lines. Avoid sharp turns: the deeper the gravel, the more your front wheel digs in and accentuates any steering movement you make. ...


8

Check the bike is the right size for you If the bike is still on sale commercially, check what the new price is. You can find out about many brands/models from bikepedia.com Find out what components (gears and brakes) it has and what they'd cost new (by Googling) Check for any hairline cracks in the frame, especially around the head tube, bottom bracket ...


7

I think these may be what you're looking for. FYI, a lot of this information is available with a little searching. Depending on what exactly you are looking for, you might want to look up a document for a specific cassette as the numbers might be slightly different. Spacer widths (From Shimano tech docs) 8 Spd: 3.00mm 9 Spd: 2.56mm 10 Spd: 2.35mm (1.0mm ...


7

As one comment has indicated, you may need to evaluate if cold this extreme is even safe to ride in. If you determine that is is, there are several issues you'll need to address. There are a lot of questions here about winter cycling. I went through question with the winter tag. Here are some of the ones applicable to your situation: Breathing may be a ...


7

First, make sure your bike is fit properly - with a bad fit, your efficiency is likely lousy. More sprockets is not necessarily going to make you go faster/easier - changing gear appropriately and becoming more physically fit will (along with better selected sprockets sizes - we went ages before the Gillette razor-blade increase in rear sprockets...). Most ...


7

Can I calculate (approximately) how much air pressure is lost by measuring the hose length and diameter? No, you cannot tell how much pressure is lost based on the size of the hose. This is not because there is not enough information to tell but because the hose is irrelevant. You seem to be under the impression that there is some total amount of ...


6

There are two problems with your assumptions: You appear to be assuming that the rider is on flat ground but neglected to mention that. The assumptions that the rider is traveling at high speed with few corners and stops doesn't reflect real world conditions. When riding hills, weight is a huge concern because of gravity, as others have mentioned. Quite ...


6

Seems like you need a bike fitting for your wife. Depending on the length of her ride (probably 2-5 miles for people not used to longer riding), she may need to work up to riding the commuting length instead of just jumping to the full commute. I'd suggest checking the saddle angle (it may be too downward), raising the handlebars if possible (this may or ...


6

My own personal experience is that small changes can make a big difference, but you should be able to get the bars 1.2 cm higher a lot cheaper than a new frame. I've found that the most critical measurement in a frame is the Effective Top Tube. If that is "right" for you then with enough bodging you can get the handlebars in the right place. For a road ...


6

Guy Martin is obviously a decent cyclist, but you should note that his record-breaking ride occurred under very special conditions. For starters, he built his own frame (or rather Jason Rourke built it for him). Next, he chose exactly where the run would take place - on sand flats. And not least he was towed in order to get up towards top speed, which ...


6

I want to use the bicycle for the 26-30mi commute that I do everyday and if it is a racing bike it could potentially save time A trained cyclist can definitely ride farther and faster on a road bike than on a hybrid bike, based solely on wind resistance and bicycle fit. However, the speeds you list are completely unrealistic. Bike speeds are based ...


6

First, note that frame sizes aren't standard - you may ride a 55cm in one model, but a 52cm in another model (say, comparing road racers to cross bikes). And, you do pick your model based on preference - I prefer a larger bike than most people of my height, since I have relatively long legs and long arms. Most of the time, you can go about 1 frame size ...


6

If you ride further or faster than you're used to, then some weariness in the legs is normal and should pass within a couple of days. I rode my biggest ride to date a couple of weeks ago and when I got home I nearly lost my balance walking around the house as my legs were a bit weaker than I expected. With a couple of days rest they were back to normal, ...


5

The solutions many people try for hand soreness include: Padded gloves Padded bar tape/gel inserts under the bar tape Raising the bars, either by moving the stem up if you have spacers above it, flipping over an angled stem or getting a new stem. Tilting the saddle backwards so that the hands aren't having push on the bars to counter you sliding forwards. ...


5

I switched bikes a year ago, and I noticed on my rides (50km - 70km) at the time that I had some numbness / cramp / pain in my hands and wrists, it was so bad on some rides that I need two hands to change gear. The bike had slightly different geometry than my previous road bike. I now ride frequently 100km and even up to 180km with little or no pain. ...


5

Short answer: Height does matter (in fact, there are multiple "heights" which you can find out about in the long answer's links), but there are a ton of other factors (e.g. top tube length which is probably more important). The bike's geometry is what determines how well it works for you. Long answer: What you need is a bike fit (which can be done at most ...


5

You probably just have to get used to the geometry of the endurance road bike (since most hybrids are closer to MTB hardtail geometry), which can be helped with bike fit, so the drop bar and saddle are positioned in a way where you can use all the hand positions of the bike (hoods, drops, middle of the bar, sides, etc.) efficiently and comfortably for the ...


5

Having made this transition myself, you may need to get used to the following things. Gear shifters. The action will be unfamiliar, so you may need to think before a change, so try to change in advance of stops at junctions and avoid shifting whilst out of the saddle. Body position, especially in the drops. It can help to physically train so that your body ...


5

I thought this was an interesting question, so first of all, +1. First off, the sloping tube (your second image) is known in cycling parlance as a compact frame. I found an article on the Giant web site about the advantages of a compact frame. When I say "advantages" - this is Giant's word not mine! The full article is here, but to summarise it: the ...


5

Intervals. Lots of intervals. I had a similar problem when training for the Seattle-To-Vancouver ride while living in southern Michigan. We have hills up north and I took a few trips there before the ride, but it really wasn't enough to reduce the suck. This year, I've taken to doing tons of intervals with a regimented training program. In order to keep ...



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