Hot answers tagged

47

In road racing there are lots of way to try and gain an advantage (or not to give others an advantage). Because this is a friendly race, I will break it down into friendly, indifferent and hostile tactics. Update 1: The OP updated their question to make it clear that they were a beginner and the other rider was a more experienced road rider. So I ...


43

The short answer is: not that difficult. The long answer requires some explanation. The equations of motion for a rider on a bicycle are well-understood if not always well-known. The power needed to propel a bicycle on firm flat ground (as on a velodrome) varies approximately with the cube of speed. Thus, to double your speed, you would need to increase ...


29

Disclaimer: I am a fixie hater. I'll try to answer this as if I was impartial. Proper road bikes (Including the Moulton) are the machines for speed, and always have been (unless you're on a velodrome). Looking at it through a speed lens, a fixie has a slight weight, aero, and drivetrain efficiency advantage over a road bike, but this usually doesn't come ...


27

It can be considered "impolite" by roadies, but not because of the bike you were riding or the fact you didn't take a pull (although I am sure some will argue for this). The main reason random drop-in riders are generally frowned upon are because of: the dangers associated with unpredictability of a new rider lack of insurance coverage Potential ...


24

As you're in Ontario the following references are official. Look at the picture at the bottom right of Toronto's Understanding Bicycle Lanes -- here's an excerpt: In summary, stop behind or pass to the left of the turning car. I generally expect drivers to see what's happening out the front of the cars, but never expect them to know what's happening to ...


22

Once the other car is in front of you generally the law and the legal system both suggest you need to give way to the car. In some places motorists technically need to give way to cyclists in the same lane or a bike lane, but that's something that the court will decide after the fact. It's IMO rude for a motorist to overtake you then turn, but it's going to ...


22

The key point here is that 90% of drivers immediately forget about any vehicle they've passed, unless it has bright flashing lights. The diagram you have added shows that you're behind, and in the driver's blind spot. Attempting pass on the inside is now to attempt suicide. The only time it's reasonably safe to pass on the inside is when the traffic is ...


20

Let the co-worker pass and then draft behind them. It becomes a game of chicken to see who goes first. This is partially why road racing at the professional level is usually done in teams. The team works together letting riders take a turn in the front so that the race moves at a reasonable pace. The other option is to just give a good effort on an uphill ...


19

250 miles is nothing. 2500 miles is also pretty much nothing -- this is under a year's worth of riding for many people. Many people still ride (and buy) bikes which are ~30 years old, and probably have 25000 miles or more on them (and will ride them for many years to come). You can look at the model number (and compare it by year to which model year it is)....


18

Most road bikes are the equivalent of an open-top racing car. You just don't ride them in the rain. And if you do, you are expected to be hard core enough that a little rain isn't worth the aerodynamic drag that the fenders would cause. And there's also a reason that hardcore racers wear sunglasses during the day or transparent glasses in the evening -- they ...


16

You have an older pre-cartridge bottom bracket. The bottom bracket is the axle and bearing assembly for the crankset. Rather than sealed bearings it has either loose ball or caged bearings. While the bottom bracket is assembled the cup is adjusted to the correct preload. Preload determines how much movement there is between the bearings and the axle. It ...


16

There is no real problems other than things getting scratched or broken being shuffled around, derailleurs easily get caught on seat belts etc. There is however a very easy and affordable option to avoid this. (Assuming you have QR skewers) Install a 2x4 or similar piece of wood. Then mount QR truck mounts to said 2x4. If you are going to be using your SUV ...


15

Who rides fixes? Roadies who have got bored with always being out the front? Maybe its someone wanting to make a statement to the "Freds" (look it up) in the group I once did a 160km ride where some guy on a MTB (with nobbiles, back in the mid 1990's steel, 26" etc) arrived home 00:04:35 behind the leading pack (About 4:10 hours). Some argued the only ...


15

A (decent) bike from the '90s would not be significantly different† from (a decent) one only a few years old except for a small weight difference and possibly lacking brifters, which are de facto standard on road bikes these days. This statement is of course excepting top-of-the-line superbikes made of carbon fiber and dragon's blood. Check it for stuff ...


15

You'll need to very carefully inspect the area around the boss that's been ripped out, as well as your usual second hand frame check. If the bike was ridden after the damage cracks could easily have spread and you might be well on the way to a two piece seat tube. This groove could be the start of a problem, but it's probably just a scar from where the cage ...


14

They're trying to sell you stuff. More expensive stuff (have you looked at 11 speed consumable (chain+cassette) prices vs 10 speed?). I would not bother upgrading. As groups go to higher and higher speeds, the older stuff gets pushed down to lower component levels. So today's 11 speed 105 group will be next year's (or likely a few years later) Tiagra ...


12

I think the terms used here are a bit confused. Rather than saying that a road bike has 22 "gears", you should be saying that it has 22 "speeds" (or more correctly, as pointed out in the comments, "gear ratios" is the technically correct most accurate term (when people say 'gear', they are using it as short for 'gear ratios')). Even that can be a bit ...


11

It depends on how the fork is engineered for safety. While its plausible that the curved shape does add to some shock absorption, that is determined by the width and construction of the fork tubing. You could design a fork which was reliable and curved in aluminum or carbon or whatever, but the engineering wouldn't be the same as a steel fork. Whether the ...


11

GC leaders are generally not out in the wind by themselves or taking many pulls on the front. They often put time on the field on climbs and in individual events like TT (which use bikes focused on aerodynamics). As such, in pack riding GC leader will likely favour a bike that focuses on climbing (light and stiff) and handling (note, aero road bikes are ...


11

You basically get what you pay for, so there isn't any secret formula. Trek is one of the largest manufacturers on the planet, and is probably as good as any other on the market. But have a look at, and test if possible, other bikes as well as Trek, because different models have different geometries, and another geometry might feel better to you. Size also ...


11

The issue with having brake levers which have travel that ends very close to the bars is that, as the brake pads wear down, the brake levers will hit the handlebars before the brakes are fully engaged. This can be mitigated by regularly inspecting your brake pads and adjusting the brakes to compensate for normal pad wear. You could have them that close if ...


10

There's a whole sport - cyclocross - that involves riding road bikes off road. Typically the gearing is a little lower than a stock road bike, and these days a lot of them have disk brakes. Most will take fairly wide tyres, 38mm is not out of the question. For riding a stock road bike off road, I'd look mostly at tyres. If you can find some that will clear ...


9

Ultimately all road bike positions are a compromise between comfort, power and aerodynamics. The balance between each component depends on your goals, experience, flexibility and any underlying injuries or physical dysfunctions. If you find a position that works for you, that is outside the "typical" road positioning, then you should consider it as valid ...


9

If you adjust a bike to the max and its still significantly too small, you should sell the bike and get a new bike. There are extra long seatposts, and extra long quill stems and what not, but in all likelihood its not really worth it if the bike doesn't fit with the normal seatpost + stem; the other parts of geometry like top tube length are probably too ...


9

It's generally a good idea to use a trainer tire for a trainer, because the tire wears down significantly faster (plus they get hotter, make more noise, etc). Rollers don't cause as much tire wear as a trainer does, but they aren't exactly the road. Many people use their regular road tires on them without any adverse effects. Some people experience ...


9

My wife is 5' 2" and raced elite road for many years. For her proportions 48-49 cm frames seemed to work well. Sometime she had mentioned interest in a smaller frame, but when I looked at how she fit on the bike I think it was due to flexibility issues (at that time) rather than frame sizing issues. Of course this is one person's experience and therefore ...


8

Not easily. V-brake levers pull twice as much cable as a calliper brake levers, so you'll not be able to swap them without swapping the levers too, and these are often attached to the shifters, so you'd end up swapping an awful lot of parts. Additionally V-brakes are mounted to a pair of bosses on the seat stays & fork legs whilst calliper brakes are ...


8

I would say that you should definitely work more on long bike rides and less on strength training. You can always wimp out on the hills and put it in an easy gear. If the max you have done is 70km, then you really need to work on the distance part of it. Another important thing to train for is how to fuel yourself during the ride. Most moderately fit ...



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