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25

This is not an either-or proposition. Your bike is hitting the bumps and supporting your full weight (minus the very small proportion of weight that might be falling at that exact moment) regardless of how you stand when you hit the bumps. The difference is whether you're going to let the additional damping effects of the down tube, seat tube, bottom ...


21

If I see a significant bump coming (on my touring bike -- no suspension), or just a stretch of fairly rough pavement, I'll generally raise my bum a few inches off the seat and flex my arms, so that my legs and arms are the "springs". This in not only more pleasant than taking the hard bumps, it also helps the bike maintain contact with the road, reducing ...


20

While some will say "it's just supply and demand" and companies charge "whatever the market will bear", I'm not convinced that your comparison is fair to try and determine whether bikes are overpriced relative to motorcycles. Using a $4,000+ road bike and comparing it to a $3,000 motorcycle is comparing the upper end of one product to the lower end of ...


14

Flat pedals are great for lots of reasons, but I won't get into the virtues or pitfalls of platforms versus toe clips versus clipless systems (though I am a big fan of plain old platform pedals.) I will try to give information pertaining to the different styles and a few examples rather than an exhaustive list of specific brands and prices. There are lots ...


13

By this do you mean pedalling when unnecessary (and without increasing the bike's speed), for example, on descents? I will do this on long descents just to keep my legs turning over and to prevent them getting too cold. But I will mix it with coasting. There is a theory that keeping the legs moving will keep your blood flowing and help pump lactic acid ...


12

Every once in a while it is just bad luck. Most of the time though, if you've fitted a new tube and it starts to leak within minutes, that means you have something on the inside of your tire that is causing the leak. A thorn, piece of glass or debris, etc. Usually you can find the culprit if you very very thoroughly run your fingers along the inside of the ...


11

The most important thing for a college campus (and commuting in general in places where there are a lot of potentially not nice people) is to have a cheap bike and locking it properly - in particular, one that doesn't attract attention. Old and scuffed up bikes are best for this. I think an old mountain bike or flat bar hybrid (like a 80s/early 90s ...


10

There are many causes for price difference in bikes. There are others reasons than these listed below, but they tend to fall in line with one of these four categories. Brand Branding is always a premium. As in every industry I can think of, some brands have a reputation that to some extent justifies a premium price. This reputation is based off a multitude ...


10

Road Road bikes are designed for performance on (mostly) well paved roads. They are the lightest weight of the 3 categories, have the shortest wheelbase, lowest bottom bracket, and the steepest headtube angles. These geometry features allow the bike to react to rider inputs quickly and to have a low center of gravity which is beneficial when turning. Wheels ...


10

Google 'cyclocross'. The primary difference between a road bike and a CX bike is the size of the tires. You can ride your road bike anywhere your skills will allow. There are some gotcha's though. Skinny tires only have so much traction. Gravel flats won't be an issue for all but the lightest of race tires, but pinch flats from hitting larger rocks at ...


9

I don't think so - I've ridden over 1/4 mile stretches of freshly poured asphalt with no apparent damage to my tires. The asphalt is around 300 degrees F when it leaves the plant, but it will have cooled to 200 degrees or less by the time it's open to traffic (water will stand on the surface without boiling, so it's definitely below 212F) Further, unless ...


9

First, let's answer the first to questions together, as they are closely related. Does one lean with the bike? ...and... Does the bike stay more upright? Short answers are yes and yes in most cases. To elaborate, let's take a look at what you're trying to achieve when cornering. I found this image recently and I think it does a great job of ...


9

As other answers and comments have indicated, you can successfully ride a road bike on loose gravel. There are five main factors, and they are all interconnected: The depth of the gravel. The key to riding in gravel is smooth lines. Avoid sharp turns: the deeper the gravel, the more your front wheel digs in and accentuates any steering movement you make. ...


8

There are a few things that are going to cost you more, simply because you are not used to working on a bike and will have to have them done for you. Tuneups - You generally get one free at about 30 days after you buy the bike. Mostly this consists of readjusting the derailleurs (shifting mechanisms) and the brakes as the cables stretch. Tuneups in my area ...


8

Some tips: Look at where you want to go (the exit of the turn) and not ahead or at your front wheel. Slightly turn your hips and waist to point to where you want to go (the exit of the turn). Also, thinking that you want to point your belly button there helps achieve this movement. Outside foot down (pressing the bike down), inside foot up. Outside hand ...


8

Disc wheels have lower drag than spoke wheels. See Wheelbuilder aerodynamic data and Aerodynamics of High Performance Race Bicycle Wheels. (One link shows simulated data, the other measured). Most of these tests run up to yaw angles of 30 degrees. The argument is typically that at higher yaw angles (closer to side-winds) the rider would choose a spoked ...


8

Check the bike is the right size for you If the bike is still on sale commercially, check what the new price is. You can find out about many brands/models from bikepedia.com Find out what components (gears and brakes) it has and what they'd cost new (by Googling) Check for any hairline cracks in the frame, especially around the head tube, bottom bracket ...


7

Buying a bike without riding it is a terrible idea. Similarly terrible ideas would include ordering a mattress without laying on it, laying down cash for a guitar without playing it, and purchasing bike shorts without trying them on. And I agree that any shop that won't let you test ride a bike is pretty suspicious. I'd try to take my business elsewhere. ...


7

In addition to the response provided by PeteH, I use "soft pedaling" when coasting to a stop on my downtube shifter/derailleur-equipped road bike in order to change gears before a stop. Some bikes (such as those with internal hubs) do not need any chain motion to shift gears, but my bike does. That's the only concrete reason why I would employ this ...


7

Your bike fit should not cause you pain. Back pain, neck pain, knee pain, hand pain, elbow pain, etc are all signs of a problem; they shouldn't simply be ignored, and probably won't just go away on their own. Muscular soreness after pushing extra hard is really the only kind of pain you should get. I suggest that you: Get the bike fit to you. Many bike ...


7

25-622 and 700C are both ways of stating the size of the wheel, not the pressure. 25-622 is an ISO size: the tyre is 25 mm rim-to-rim, and 622 mm in diameter. 700C is a more traditional name for the diameter, which is more often known as 28 inch. ISO sizes are somewhat out of fashion these days, as there's less variation in wheel size. See the late Sheldon ...


7

I think these may be what you're looking for. FYI, a lot of this information is available with a little searching. Depending on what exactly you are looking for, you might want to look up a document for a specific cassette as the numbers might be slightly different. Spacer widths (From Shimano tech docs) 8 Spd: 3.00mm 9 Spd: 2.56mm 10 Spd: 2.35mm (1.0mm ...


7

As one comment has indicated, you may need to evaluate if cold this extreme is even safe to ride in. If you determine that is is, there are several issues you'll need to address. There are a lot of questions here about winter cycling. I went through question with the winter tag. Here are some of the ones applicable to your situation: Breathing may be a ...


7

First, make sure your bike is fit properly - with a bad fit, your efficiency is likely lousy. More sprockets is not necessarily going to make you go faster/easier - changing gear appropriately and becoming more physically fit will (along with better selected sprockets sizes - we went ages before the Gillette razor-blade increase in rear sprockets...). Most ...


7

Can I calculate (approximately) how much air pressure is lost by measuring the hose length and diameter? No, you cannot tell how much pressure is lost based on the size of the hose. This is not because there is not enough information to tell but because the hose is irrelevant. You seem to be under the impression that there is some total amount of ...


6

Issues of where to find a bike have been answered pretty thoroughly here, including the standard disclaimers of making sure a bike isn't stolen before purchasing. On advice for how to see how ride-worthy a bike is: Definitely take a look at the bike before buying. Give it a quick once-over for general wear or use. If the bike looks like it hasn't been ...


6

Bicycle size is determined first by frame size, which is top tube length, seat tube length, and some more minor geometries like head tube and seat tube angle. The primary determing factor for comfort on the bike is your reach measurement. Although it is affected by various factors, like skeletal flexibility and the type of riding you do, ideal reach is ...


6

It seems odd that somebody wanting to sell a bike to you wouldn't allow a test ride. Most places encourage you to take the bike for a test ride, at least around the parking lot or around the block, and usually with a bike store employee following closely behind. If they can't offer you a test ride, perhaps you could persuade them to mount the bike onto a ...


6

You should be light on your bike. It's not really an either or thing. If you're light on the bike (letting it jump under you), it takes the hit but then is able to move how it wants after that. If you've got your full weight on the bike, then it still takes the jolt, but can't move - you're holding it down. Roughly, the bike gets squeezed between you and ...


6

At risk of being downvoted, you don't want want solid tires. There's a reason that all performance tires for all vehicles are pneumatic. The decrease in compliance of a solid foam or rubber tire just doesn't compare to a pneumatic tire. Look into a tire with kevlar reinforcement- most brands have them- or aftermarket anti-puncture tire liners that sit ...



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