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20

Since you say you're looking to become a triathlete soon it's far too early to be thinking of advanced training aids like power meters. The first few things to do (not necessarily in this order) are join a tri club enter a triathlon or two join a tri training squad observe your (comparative) strengths and weaknesses get a well recommended triathlon book. ...


15

TL:DR Get the CX Bike, you'll love it! You get three bikes in one, without trading in any noticeable performance on the road. This answer is subjective and based on personal experience, you have been warned: I have a CX bike that is used as a do-it-all bike, and I love it. For almost all aspects that concern any non-professional cyclist a CX is as good, or ...


15

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


14

If you have n bikes, n+1 bikes is the right amount of bikes to have. ;) Realistically, I think 2 or 3 is adequate - a cyclocross or non-racing road bike can do the first two tasks (road ride + commute) provided it has rack and fender mounts, and one mountain bike is likely good enough for the trails in one's area (if you go somewhere else where another ...


14

It's doable although it doesn't make sense from a cost perspective. Only do it if you have an emotional investment in the bike or want a fun project that will teach you a lot about bike mechanics. To give you an idea, I bought a 1975 Peugeot UO18 Mixte (a woman's road bike, perhaps similar to your mom's) that had been stored in a barn and turned it into my ...


12

If you are riding near your aerobic limit you'll definitely discover that you've lost aerobic capacity during the next 12-24 hours. It can take that long to replace the red blood cells you've lost. Since a blood donation is about 10% of your blood capacity, your aerobic capacity will be down by 10% I wrote the rest of this before I saw your comment that ...


11

Aside from n+1, the other honest answer is: as many as your spouse will tolerate. I have six (two road bikes, one mtb, two folders, one English cruiser). I have met the spousal tolerance factor. After this, I can only replace, not add. So if I really want that Brompton, one of the folders has to go. Now, your question doesn't also get to another important ...


11

You have a couple different options. I think the cheapest would be to switch to a compact crankset which would change the front chainrings from 52-39 to 50-34. I'm pretty sure you could do this while still using the same shifter. Changing the front shifter is required if you want to go from a double to a triple, as is changing the front derailleur. If you ...


10

Astra was the Beacon Cycle house brand, according to Sheldon. As @Blam and @Daniel R Hicks say, it's a mid-range 80s bike (that's a compliment)! The lugs, while nothing special, aren't drainpipe thick - this is a good thing. It was probably built well. Crankset may be Stronglight, and the derailleur and front mech are probably Sachs-Huret. Basic components ...


10

I'm not sure "designed" is the correct word, evolved comes much closer. Current dual caliper brakes actually stop a lot better than previous single caliper sidepulls. There has always been a compromise between weight and braking power. The designers have focused on how light they can make a brake that stops "enough". I don't think there has been any effort ...


9

Almost all saddles will be exchangeable -- there are a few rare (and very expensive ones) you wouldn't encounter unless you were looking for them which can't be exchanged. So yes, almost surely if you buy a new saddle you can use it on another bike. Note that some saddles are marketed as "road" or "mtb" - the mtb ones are possibly more durable, but this ...


8

I'm not sure that anyone is going to be able to give you a definitive answer... especially since you are asking if your commute will improve by 30 seconds when the commute time you give has a range of 60 seconds. But 30 seconds out of 17.5 minutes is about a 2-3% improvement, which seems reasonable... The more interesting question would be "what can this ...


8

Assuming that you're talking about cleats on your shoes, there are three main attachment systems. Left: 2-bolt, Middle: 2 or 3 bolt, Right: 3 bolt. Notice how the one on the left has a chunkier sole. The two-bolt option is used for SPD which are popular with MTB, commuting and touring cyclists. I use 2-bolt SPD shoes on my audax bike because I'm able to ...


8

As already said, aerodynamics are less important to MTB's, but otherwise its largely convention and fashion that dictate what people wear. A vast majority of MTB'r are not wearing basic shorts - they are usually wearing shorts made for riding, including padding just like Lycra road shorts, flat seams and materials designed to withstand the rigour of riding. ...


8

It is not allowed by UCI rules, but comissars usually allow it if it is due to mechanical reasons and used to get back to the peloton, since they have discretional ability to decide. Time penalties or disqualification if used to gain advantage over the peloton. So, rule enforcement may vary depending on many circumstances, and I guess they don't want to lose ...


8

The key point in your question is I get on the bike and ride hard. There's nothing wrong with riding hard, but it sounds like you're riding too hard for your knees to be happy. Since you like doing weights, I suspect that you like to push the pedals hard, and this is causing the problem. Bike fit issues can cause knee soreness, but they also tend to have ...


7

Having a Felt F75 myself, I would recommend the following upgrade path from stock: Clipless pedals They take some getting used to, but behold the extra power and comfort! Tyres (and tubes). Vredestein Fortezza Tricomp or similar lightweight folding tyres will give noticeably better grip than stock equipment. Latex inner tubes will smooth the ride and ...


7

Some personal thoughts/opinions: If you're not riding much longer than an hour or so, you might not need much. Perhaps a sports/electrolyte drink that contains sugars will suffice and be convenient. I use mainly cheap gel bars for a sugar hit, but they get quite boring and eat away at your teeth. Flapjack, oats, etc are good for a bit of variety but ...


7

This will run in python (only 3.X, not 2.7), a free to install programming language. Simply save the following as a file ending .py - e.g. timetrials.py. Then open IDLE3 (start menu), and open the file (Ctrl+O). Finally, press F5 to start it. import datetime from operator import itemgetter def get_int_input(prompt, min_=0, max_=None): """Get a valid ...


7

These are referring to pad spacers. They essentially increase or decrease the amount of motion you have when moving the brake levers. See page 16 of the following PDF for a better diagram: Shimano Brake Levers User Guide


7

I currently ride on Rubino Pro Slick tires, and have used various Vittoria tires for decades. The Vittoria Rubino tires you are using have similar wet grip to what I use (dry grip will be the same). The pressures you quote are good. I get the impression that both incidents occurred in the same corner. If that is the case then I would strongly suspect oil ...


7

Could be as simple as the wheel rubbing on the brakes - rotate the pedals and listen for a scraping noise as the wheel contacts the pads. If this is the case, check that the wheel is true by observing for any wobble side to side as the wheel rotates. If that looks ok your brakes probably need adjusted away from the rims. Start here for brake adjustment ...


7

Everything is relative. For 99% of the population 30kph for 3 hours would be amazing. For a male A grade club rider it would be an off day. For a female A grade club rider it's not bad for a solo training ride. About bunches Sometimes an ad hoc bunch forms in a popular road. These can be dangerous - you don't know the experience level of these people, ...


7

Riding at 30kph average for 3 hours, in a hilly area is a solid effort. Assuming your pack riding skills are sufficient, you will also likely do fine in in a club ride that averages 30-40kph (but see the pack riding primer below). Club rides will have a faster pace than what you are riding now, but you will also be working a lot less (about 30% less) at any ...


7

They do help with training and racing but they are also very expensive. As you say you are a beginner I imagine increases in fitness/strength (and therefore speed) are going to come fast anyway, even without a power readout to base training around. I would definitely invest in a HRM though and make sure the bike computer you use has cadence as well as ...


7

Depends on exercise intensity. In a day or two you can return to your normal/moderate exercise. A complete recovery of oxygen delivery can take as much as 3/4 weeks. This means a professional athlete should be careful because he will loose performance, but us normal human beings can carry our normal daily lives. You can read more complete answerers given ...


6

If you ride further or faster than you're used to, then some weariness in the legs is normal and should pass within a couple of days. I rode my biggest ride to date a couple of weeks ago and when I got home I nearly lost my balance walking around the house as my legs were a bit weaker than I expected. With a couple of days rest they were back to normal, ...


6

I had the same problem as you when I bought my rollers, the best advice is to place the rollers in a door frame. Start by holding onto the doorframe and get used to spinning with one hand on the bike. You should always try to maintain a high cadence (and speed) when you first start, the momentum will help you balance. The plan is to pedal in a perfect ...



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