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38

The fork is fitted the wrong way around. The brake caliper should be in front of the fork, not behind it. The way it is, the bike will be very, very hard to ride because of the negative rake, making it very nervous. The negative rake is also the reason for the pedal overlap. Normally, you should at most get some toe overlap. Loosen the bolt in the top of ...


16

Forget the tarp. Ultimately, the greatest danger to your bike is not the weather, it's thieves. As long as you invest in a good lock, practice good locking technique, and don't live in an area full of degenerates you should be fine. My bike is worth more than $1000 and I ride it all over and lock it up outside frequently. When you select your bike, don't ...


14

If you have n bikes, n+1 bikes is the right amount of bikes to have. ;) Realistically, I think 2 or 3 is adequate - a cyclocross or non-racing road bike can do the first two tasks (road ride + commute) provided it has rack and fender mounts, and one mountain bike is likely good enough for the trails in one's area (if you go somewhere else where another ...


14

TL:DR Get the CX Bike, you'll love it! You get three bikes in one, without trading in any noticeable performance on the road. This answer is subjective and based on personal experience, you have been warned: I have a CX bike that is used as a do-it-all bike, and I love it. For almost all aspects that concern any non-professional cyclist a CX is as good, or ...


12

In bicycles, the technological advance is not as fast as you might think. This is due to the UCI, which blocks a lot of new technologies or is slow to allow them in races. So I think as long as the older bike is in good shape, there won't be much difference. Maybe it's a nine-speed instead of the modern ten or eleven, but that doesn't really make a ...


11

Aside from n+1, the other honest answer is: as many as your spouse will tolerate. I have six (two road bikes, one mtb, two folders, one English cruiser). I have met the spousal tolerance factor. After this, I can only replace, not add. So if I really want that Brompton, one of the folders has to go. Now, your question doesn't also get to another important ...


10

Astra was the Beacon Cycle house brand, according to Sheldon. As @Blam and @Daniel R Hicks say, it's a mid-range 80s bike (that's a compliment)! The lugs, while nothing special, aren't drainpipe thick - this is a good thing. It was probably built well. Crankset may be Stronglight, and the derailleur and front mech are probably Sachs-Huret. Basic components ...


10

I'm not sure "designed" is the correct word, evolved comes much closer. Current dual caliper brakes actually stop a lot better than previous single caliper sidepulls. There has always been a compromise between weight and braking power. The designers have focused on how light they can make a brake that stops "enough". I don't think there has been any effort ...


9

Google 'cyclocross'. The primary difference between a road bike and a CX bike is the size of the tires. You can ride your road bike anywhere your skills will allow. There are some gotcha's though. Skinny tires only have so much traction. Gravel flats won't be an issue for all but the lightest of race tires, but pinch flats from hitting larger rocks at ...


9

As other answers and comments have indicated, you can successfully ride a road bike on loose gravel. There are five main factors, and they are all interconnected: The depth of the gravel. The key to riding in gravel is smooth lines. Avoid sharp turns: the deeper the gravel, the more your front wheel digs in and accentuates any steering movement you make. ...


9

Almost all saddles will be exchangeable -- there are a few rare (and very expensive ones) you wouldn't encounter unless you were looking for them which can't be exchanged. So yes, almost surely if you buy a new saddle you can use it on another bike. Note that some saddles are marketed as "road" or "mtb" - the mtb ones are possibly more durable, but this ...


8

I'm not sure that anyone is going to be able to give you a definitive answer... especially since you are asking if your commute will improve by 30 seconds when the commute time you give has a range of 60 seconds. But 30 seconds out of 17.5 minutes is about a 2-3% improvement, which seems reasonable... The more interesting question would be "what can this ...


8

Assuming that you're talking about cleats on your shoes, there are three main attachment systems. Left: 2-bolt, Middle: 2 or 3 bolt, Right: 3 bolt. Notice how the one on the left has a chunkier sole. The two-bolt option is used for SPD which are popular with MTB, commuting and touring cyclists. I use 2-bolt SPD shoes on my audax bike because I'm able to ...


7

Having a Felt F75 myself, I would recommend the following upgrade path from stock: Clipless pedals They take some getting used to, but behold the extra power and comfort! Tyres (and tubes). Vredestein Fortezza Tricomp or similar lightweight folding tyres will give noticeably better grip than stock equipment. Latex inner tubes will smooth the ride and ...


7

Can I calculate (approximately) how much air pressure is lost by measuring the hose length and diameter? No, you cannot tell how much pressure is lost based on the size of the hose. This is not because there is not enough information to tell but because the hose is irrelevant. You seem to be under the impression that there is some total amount of ...


7

I won't give my own question the check. I have a few bikes and I see a bike I want and I am going through the can I justify to myself. How many is too much? If you don't have room to store them safely and sheltered then too many. If you are not going to maintain them then it is too many. You can't afford it. When do you need more than one bike? ...


7

Some personal thoughts/opinions: If you're not riding much longer than an hour or so, you might not need much. Perhaps a sports/electrolyte drink that contains sugars will suffice and be convenient. I use mainly cheap gel bars for a sugar hit, but they get quite boring and eat away at your teeth. Flapjack, oats, etc are good for a bit of variety but ...


7

This will run in python (only 3.X, not 2.7), a free to install programming language. Simply save the following as a file ending .py - e.g. timetrials.py. Then open IDLE3 (start menu), and open the file (Ctrl+O). Finally, press F5 to start it. import datetime from operator import itemgetter def get_int_input(prompt, min_=0, max_=None): """Get a valid ...


7

These are referring to pad spacers. They essentially increase or decrease the amount of motion you have when moving the brake levers. See page 16 of the following PDF for a better diagram: Shimano Brake Levers User Guide


7

I currently ride on Rubino Pro Slick tires, and have used various Vittoria tires for decades. The Vittoria Rubino tires you are using have similar wet grip to what I use (dry grip will be the same). The pressures you quote are good. I get the impression that both incidents occurred in the same corner. If that is the case then I would strongly suspect oil ...


6

My own personal experience is that small changes can make a big difference, but you should be able to get the bars 1.2 cm higher a lot cheaper than a new frame. I've found that the most critical measurement in a frame is the Effective Top Tube. If that is "right" for you then with enough bodging you can get the handlebars in the right place. For a road ...


6

Guy Martin is obviously a decent cyclist, but you should note that his record-breaking ride occurred under very special conditions. For starters, he built his own frame (or rather Jason Rourke built it for him). Next, he chose exactly where the run would take place - on sand flats. And not least he was towed in order to get up towards top speed, which ...


6

I want to use the bicycle for the 26-30mi commute that I do everyday and if it is a racing bike it could potentially save time A trained cyclist can definitely ride farther and faster on a road bike than on a hybrid bike, based solely on wind resistance and bicycle fit. However, the speeds you list are completely unrealistic. Bike speeds are based ...


6

First, note that frame sizes aren't standard - you may ride a 55cm in one model, but a 52cm in another model (say, comparing road racers to cross bikes). And, you do pick your model based on preference - I prefer a larger bike than most people of my height, since I have relatively long legs and long arms. Most of the time, you can go about 1 frame size ...


6

If you ride further or faster than you're used to, then some weariness in the legs is normal and should pass within a couple of days. I rode my biggest ride to date a couple of weeks ago and when I got home I nearly lost my balance walking around the house as my legs were a bit weaker than I expected. With a couple of days rest they were back to normal, ...


6

I had the same problem as you when I bought my rollers, the best advice is to place the rollers in a door frame. Start by holding onto the doorframe and get used to spinning with one hand on the bike. You should always try to maintain a high cadence (and speed) when you first start, the momentum will help you balance. The plan is to pedal in a perfect ...


6

A CX bike is stable, strong, and will take wider tires. It is a great road and commute bicycle. It is built to race in city parks. It has a comfortable riding position. Just put touring tires on it (I like 35mm). I don't mean to advertise a bike but if you look at a high end CX like Moots the even say use as light touring. Rout You are not going to ...


6

For grades beyond 10% having a gear that you can spin at the rate you can climb makes a big difference. Only you can know exactly what gear that should be. If you can find a gear ratio tool that displays speeds for a given gear, wheel size and rpm. This one seems pretty good. http://www.bikecalc.com/cadence_at_speed Then think about your typical speeds ...


5

You probably just have to get used to the geometry of the endurance road bike (since most hybrids are closer to MTB hardtail geometry), which can be helped with bike fit, so the drop bar and saddle are positioned in a way where you can use all the hand positions of the bike (hoods, drops, middle of the bar, sides, etc.) efficiently and comfortably for the ...


5

Having made this transition myself, you may need to get used to the following things. Gear shifters. The action will be unfamiliar, so you may need to think before a change, so try to change in advance of stops at junctions and avoid shifting whilst out of the saddle. Body position, especially in the drops. It can help to physically train so that your body ...



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