Hot answers tagged

43

The short answer is: not that difficult. The long answer requires some explanation. The equations of motion for a rider on a bicycle are well-understood if not always well-known. The power needed to propel a bicycle on firm flat ground (as on a velodrome) varies approximately with the cube of speed. Thus, to double your speed, you would need to increase ...


42

In road racing there are lots of way to try and gain an advantage (or not to give others an advantage). Because this is a friendly race, I will break it down into friendly, indifferent and hostile tactics. UPDATE: The OP updated their question to make it clear that they were a beginner and the other rider was a more experienced road rider. So I ...


29

Disclaimer: I am a fixie hater. I'll try to answer this as if I was impartial. Proper road bikes (Including the Moulton) are the machines for speed, and always have been (unless you're on a velodrome). Looking at it through a speed lens, a fixie has a slight weight, aero, and drivetrain efficiency advantage over a road bike, but this usually doesn't come ...


27

It can be considered "impolite" by roadies, but not because of the bike you were riding or the fact you didn't take a pull (although I am sure some will argue for this). The main reason random drop-in riders are generally frowned upon are because of: the dangers associated with unpredictability of a new rider lack of insurance coverage Potential ...


21

Since you say you're looking to become a triathlete soon it's far too early to be thinking of advanced training aids like power meters. The first few things to do (not necessarily in this order) are join a tri club enter a triathlon or two join a tri training squad observe your (comparative) strengths and weaknesses get a well recommended triathlon book. ...


17

Let the co-worker pass and then draft behind them. It becomes a game of chicken to see who goes first. This is partially why road racing at the professional level is usually done in teams. The team works together letting riders take a turn in the front so that the race moves at a reasonable pace. The other option is to just give a good effort on an uphill ...


16

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


16

In rapidly descending order of importance ... (see Why I chose these priorities below) Practice track stands. See How to do a track stand? This teaches balance and slow bike handling skills. Also practice riding in confined spaces (the last time I fell off was trying to do a U turn on a path that was 4 ft (1.2m) wide :-) Learn to jump both wheels off the ...


16

You have an older pre-cartridge bottom bracket. The bottom bracket is the axle and bearing assembly for the crankset. Rather than sealed bearings it has either loose ball or caged bearings. While the bottom bracket is assembled the cup is adjusted to the correct preload. Preload determines how much movement there is between the bearings and the axle. It ...


15

It's doable although it doesn't make sense from a cost perspective. Only do it if you have an emotional investment in the bike or want a fun project that will teach you a lot about bike mechanics. To give you an idea, I bought a 1975 Peugeot UO18 Mixte (a woman's road bike, perhaps similar to your mom's) that had been stored in a barn and turned it into my ...


15

Who rides fixes? Roadies who have got bored with always being out the front? Maybe its someone wanting to make a statement to the "Freds" (look it up) in the group I once did a 160km ride where some guy on a MTB (with nobbiles, back in the mid 1990's steel, 26" etc) arrived home 00:04:35 behind the leading pack (About 4:10 hours). Some argued the only ...


13

Most road bikes are the equivalent of an open-top racing car. You just don't ride them in the rain. And if you do, you are expected to be hard core enough that a little rain isn't worth the aerodynamic drag that the fenders would cause. And there's also a reason that hardcore racers wear sunglasses during the day or transparent glasses in the evening -- they ...


12

I think the terms used here are a bit confused. Rather than saying that a road bike has 22 "gears", you should be saying that it has 22 "speeds" (or more correctly, as pointed out in the comments, "gear ratios" is the technically correct most accurate term (when people say 'gear', they are using it as short for 'gear ratios')). Even that can be a bit ...


12

If you are riding near your aerobic limit you'll definitely discover that you've lost aerobic capacity during the next 12-24 hours. It can take that long to replace the red blood cells you've lost. Since a blood donation is about 10% of your blood capacity, your aerobic capacity will be down by 10% I wrote the rest of this before I saw your comment that ...


11

It depends on how the fork is engineered for safety. While its plausible that the curved shape does add to some shock absorption, that is determined by the width and construction of the fork tubing. You could design a fork which was reliable and curved in aluminum or carbon or whatever, but the engineering wouldn't be the same as a steel fork. Whether the ...


11

As already said, aerodynamics are less important to MTB's, but otherwise its largely convention and fashion that dictate what people wear. A vast majority of MTB'r are not wearing basic shorts - they are usually wearing shorts made for riding, including padding just like Lycra road shorts, flat seams and materials designed to withstand the rigour of riding. ...


11

You have a couple different options. I think the cheapest would be to switch to a compact crankset which would change the front chainrings from 52-39 to 50-34. I'm pretty sure you could do this while still using the same shifter. Changing the front shifter is required if you want to go from a double to a triple, as is changing the front derailleur. If you ...


11

Cannondale with it's new Boost 148mm rear spacing standard could fit some more gears theoretically without making the chain thinner. But the real question is if more gears are actually needed. What really matters is the cassette range which is determined by the smallest and biggest cog wheels. Now we have the smallest cog with 10 teeth, and there was a ...


11

GC leaders are generally not out in the wind by themselves or taking many pulls on the front. They often put time on the field on climbs and in individual events like TT (which use bikes focused on aerodynamics). As such, in pack riding GC leader will likely favour a bike that focuses on climbing (light and stiff) and handling (note, aero road bikes are ...


10

Yes, absolutely. Clothing is mostly an issue of personal preference. Performance fabrics and things like spandex don't make that much difference for short stretches, and their advantages become more pronounced and valuable the longer you ride. 11 miles is somewhat of an intermediate distance; in regular clothes you'd be totally fine, assuming that the ...


10

Not a complete answer really, but I've had a scan through this TdF data Twitter account and Greipel's winning speeds from his two wins this year are an average of 59.58 km/h over the last km and a peak speed of 67.03 km/h. Pretty quick. Edit: more stats for nerds here.


9

This is a special device that gathers the following data, according to this article: the stage winner’s top speed, average speed and time per kilometer the fastest riders up key climbs the speed of the winner at the finish line the top speed achieved by a rider on the day average speed across all riders


9

Ultimately all road bike positions are a compromise between comfort, power and aerodynamics. The balance between each component depends on your goals, experience, flexibility and any underlying injuries or physical dysfunctions. If you find a position that works for you, that is outside the "typical" road positioning, then you should consider it as valid ...


9

If you adjust a bike to the max and its still significantly too small, you should sell the bike and get a new bike. There are extra long seatposts, and extra long quill stems and what not, but in all likelihood its not really worth it if the bike doesn't fit with the normal seatpost + stem; the other parts of geometry like top tube length are probably too ...


9

It's generally a good idea to use a trainer tire for a trainer, because the tire wears down significantly faster (plus they get hotter, make more noise, etc). Rollers don't cause as much tire wear as a trainer does, but they aren't exactly the road. Many people use their regular road tires on them without any adverse effects. Some people experience ...


9

My wife is 5' 2" and raced elite road for many years. For her proportions 48-49 cm frames seemed to work well. Sometime she had mentioned interest in a smaller frame, but when I looked at how she fit on the bike I think it was due to flexibility issues (at that time) rather than frame sizing issues. Of course this is one person's experience and therefore ...


8

It is not allowed by UCI rules, but comissars usually allow it if it is due to mechanical reasons and used to get back to the peloton, since they have discretional ability to decide. Time penalties or disqualification if used to gain advantage over the peloton. So, rule enforcement may vary depending on many circumstances, and I guess they don't want to lose ...



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