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1

Bang for buck would suggest an aluminum rack, but these typically don't support high loads. Once you start heading into the 20-30+ kg range steel performs better in terms of total load capacity and behavior under load (I.e., less flex which reduces the chance of a shimmy). In terms of steel I have had good luck with Tubus and hear good things about Surly ...


1

You'd need to replace the hub (i.e. build the wheel with a new hub -- typically, its better to just get a new wheel), and then respace the frame (i.e. coldset) to take the new hub. It's easy still to find freewheels, so I'd recommend you just replace the freewheel.


2

Well, you don't have to… That said, Tektro makes some very nice and inexpensive levers – both drop bar levers (RL340) and interrupter levers (RL720) which are much more effective than suicide levers. At the very least, I would take off the suicide levers, I've never had good luck with them. The problem that I had with suicide levers was that they had so much ...


1

Tsunoda are/were a mass manufacturer in Japan somewhat similar to Schwinn in the USA. Most of the bikes they produced were low end though they did make some mid-to-upper end models (I once had a Tsunoda made Lotus branded frame from the early 80s). I believe the brand is still around in the Japanese market but now mostly making folding bikes. Your bike ...


4

To me, gravel bikes seem mostly like cross bikes with a bit more money they can take from your wallet. 1) Road and mountain shifters and derailleurs don't play nice with each other at 11 speed, so this question is moot. If you want to check a particular crankset on the bike, look at the width and the type of BB setup. I don't see why you'd want to switch ...


2

Any bike can go anywhere. I've taken a road bike down an off-road course, and an electric assist road bike up a steep gravel path (not fun) My weekend ride these days is a non-suspension steel mountain bike with knobbly tyres but a smooth strip on the face of the tread for road comfort. As long as the parts work together and fit your body and style of ...


1

According to the FORMULA 88 Material Safety Data Sheet, this product is not dangerous, and is soluble in water. Washing it off was the best you could do. My guess is that the solvent has dissolved some of the components of the tire rubber, leading to the fading and cracking you see. Only time will tell if the tire has been structurally compromised. The ...


0

Depends on the type of tour you are doing. My 20 mile work commute requires panniers, cold and wet weather gear for the winter, lights for early morning and late evenings along with the common small items: 1. Two spare tubes 2. Patch kit 3. Bike-specific multi-tool 4. Frame-fit pump 5. Emergency identification 6. Water bottle with water Regular ID, ...


6

Bicycle Helmet Suitable clothing and shoes Cellphone Whatever else you "need" depends on your mechanical abilities and how independent you wish to be.


0

If it's a quality bike, it will attract professional bike (part) thieves – which are everywhere, like bacteria – and you should invest in a quality U-lock and a set of good anti-theft skewers for the wheels and seat post.


0

It's identical to what I have on my cyclocross bike from running too wide tires, except my rub damage is to aluminum. Since you already checked the skewers, check the dish of the wheel to see how close its coming to the chainstay, also check if there is play in the axle/hub, that may cause extra flex. A lot of power can cause frame flex and tire contact. ...


15

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


3

I would go for a good floor pump, as I find it can be extremely important in preventing flats. One big problem I see is underinflated tires. This can cause flats and other problems like rim damage. A good floor pump will make it not so much of a chore to ensure your tires are always properly topped up. If you plan on leaving your bike anywhere except your ...


1

If you already have the usual tools and clothing you can always need more of the typical wear parts: Tires, tubes, chains, brake pads, chain oil, cables, pants … Otherwise I’d start with a proper stand pump, mini pump (for on the bike), tubes, chain tool, hex keys, lock, bottles, helmet … Clothing is of course essential but hard to guess the right size for ...


0

(I don`t have a definitive answer) . I would concentrate on what is most frustrating when it fails when riding a bike: Tire and wheels maintenance: Tire levers. Good air pump. Good tube patch kit. Replacement tubes and tires. A set of hex wrenches (check Imperial vs. Metric) After that, you can add whatever you feel will help you maintain your bike ...


0

It looks like the tyre has rubbed due to the wheel being pulled over,this is caused if the skewers were not tight enough.recentre the wheel and re tighten the quick release skewers


3

Proper fit in an aerobar posture is designed to allow you to race well. In order to race well you will need to be comfortable enough to produce power, to reduce aerodynamic drag, and to handle the bike well and safely for the duration of your race. If your fit otherwise meets all your needs, you shouldn't be concerned about where your knee is positioned ...


2

While it's true that a larger chainring will have slightly less friction and thus slightly more efficiently, it's an extremely negligible amount, that you wouldn't be able to feel. More importantly, are your crankarm lengths different on the new crankset than the old? That makes a much bigger difference. For example, if you've went from 175's to 170's, that ...


0

Let me contradict some of the other answers here. Weight is not going to make a lot of difference to your speed or endurance, so just ignore it. If you don't believe me, try the following experiment: Pack a 500g weight (about a pound) somewhere that you can comforetably carry it (e.g. in a backpack, or around your waist). Go on a few rides and measure ...


2

I just switched to a road bike from a hybrid. On my first time out commuting into work this morning I arrived in 32 mins as opposed to 37 previously. Weight is a big issue. Newton's 2nd law F= ma or acceleration = Force / mass, so if your bike is twice as heavy then it will take twice as much effort to get up to a given speed. Then you have resistance, ...


2

I've ended up with similar marks on some of my bikes that have tight tolerances for tires. Often I have found that the tire itself doesn't rub, but some of the sprues do. My fat bike in particular has a very tight rear triangle, and even with a properly dished wheel, I have to remove the sprues. As to the danger, you'd have to look very closely and feel ...


-1

I use 10 speed Ultra shifters and XTR 9 speed with a 11-36 and works fine on my road bike


5

Treating "competitive cyclists" as this single unified group (with three subgrouping) belies some prejudices. Like all walks of life there are a diversity of people, all with different motivations, morals and life experiences. As such there is no single correct answer your various questions. For example: are people in pelotons generally friendly, ...


2

Replace "cycling" in this question with any competitive sport. How should we know if it's right for you? How should we know what the community of cyclists near you is like, or whether or not you'll get along with them? Enter a race. Did you have fun? Enter another one. Or don't. Your call.


0

The larger chainring reduces drive chain friction - so is more efficient. This article from cyclingtips lists a study which demonstrated this You can see the effects of this in the peleton where riders like Froome are favouring assymetric rings to give them periods of greater efficiency and reduced torque during pedalling


6

It is relatively simple to find parts to fit old bikes. Things have changed a lot but there are still enough old bikes out there that you will not have a difficult time getting replacement chains, cogsets, derailers, wheels, bottom brackets, wheel bearings, seat posts, stems, headsets, or anything else. Any gaps in what is available can likely be filled by a ...


0

Regarding interchangeable components, it's hard to say without pictures, but it's likely this will be hard because a) old bike, old standards and b) even with the same standards road and mountain components are substantially different. Regarding old vs new, this question is hard to answer. If you take a look at similar answers in this Stack Overflow you ...


4

I think it all depends on the use you are going to give the bike. I've owned nothing but older bikes (road) since I resumed cycling around 2006, mostly for commuting and occasional longer rides (on the lines of 5.000 km / year) and everything has been ok. What I would do is try and find some old bike that works fine, and not get into the upgrade thing; if ...


1

If you are doing exercises that cause pain in your knee, it generally could mean one of two things, your mechanics are bad and putting strain on your joint, or your joint hasn't seen such hard use and the tendons, ligaments and joint capsule aren't adapted to such use. Since it sounds like you strength train regularly, I'd guess you have a mechanics issue. ...


-1

I'd guess you're doing the majority of the damage to your knees with the squats and that the riding the bike heavily just exacerbates it. Maybe you also just don't really have any other occasion to use your knee ligaments in a way to feel the damage you're doing. I'm a pedal masher too but heavy squats are a real killer.


2

Talking about science, there are two factors here: moment of inertia - smaller and lighter cogs in a compact crankset mean smaller moment of inertia, which in turn means that you need smaller force to obtain the same acceleration. In this aspect a compact crankset gives a slight advantage. Note: this parameter is practically insignificant when it comes to ...


2

The motor doesn’t have to contribute to upper limit riding. Click the motor on and spend the first half of the race freewheeling at 200W and save your legs. Throw in a change of bike then you can save weight for when you need it. The focus seems to be on GC riders using this technology for direct benefit, but the GC rider could benefit from having a ...


4

As far as assisting at race pace - a cadence of 90 or 100 is not a limit for an electric motor designed for it. With the dollars involved in cycling generally, and at elite sports specifically, I do not see any barrier from an electromechanical perspective. Most importantly for an elite rider, the motor can be optimised for a cadence between 85-95 - a very ...


2

Cannondale with it's new Boost 148mm rear spacing standard could fit some more gears theoretically without making the chain thinner. But the real question is if more gears are actually needed. What really matters is the cassette range which is determined by the smallest and biggest cog wheels. Now we have the smallest cog with 10 teeth, and there was a ...


0

Have you tried adjusting it at the caliper ,just dial it back a notch or maybe two ,but make sure your brakes are still effective when you do.


1

Without any inside information into the R&D efforts of Shimano, SRAM or Campagnolo, it's pure speculation at best. I assume that they are looking at the idea of 12-speed, but it'll probably be close to 10 years until we see it (9 to 10 speed took ~7 years; 10 to 11 speed took ~9 years), especially with all the focus on electronic gruppos at the moment. ...


0

It could be a number of issues but I doubt you got a bad hub. Check to make sure your wheel is seated correctly in the fork. You could also try tightening/loosening the skewer to see if that may help align things. If all that doesn't work then you can try to realign the caliper if necessary. I wouldn't worry much if its just a little rub.


0

Also look at touring bikes. Road and CX bikes are made for racing. Which means they have a quite aggressive fit which makes you lean over the handlebars quite a bit. Touring bikes are much more laid back and comfortable, while still being very efficient. They have room for racks, fenders, and big tires which can be nice for riding in the city. If the bike ...


1

The easiest way to tell is by going to a bike shop and test riding few bikes. I had the same decision to make recently (road or CX), and after test riding, I was confident I wanted to CX. The road bike was noticeably faster, but the comfort on the CX trumped that for me, and it was still very fast (33C road tires, compact gearing). It is also running without ...


2

I've had a hardtail mountain bike for a few years, and used it for all kinds of rides -- singletrack, rail trails, roads. A few months ago I got a cyclocross bike (Norco Threshold) in addition to the mountain bike. So I'm in pretty much exactly the situation you describe. I am enjoying the cyclocross bike and I feel like it's made me about 3-4mph ...


0

It looks like a 2003 Kona Kona to me. Kona made the Kona until 2005 and then in 2006 they started the Zing line. It's a very standard entry level "bike shop" road bike. Assuming a lot of parts swap hasn't happened, that page should have most of the info.


5

At 10 o'clock there is a wedge that holds the handlebar. Taking off the plastic cap at the end of the stem reveals the bolts for tightening the stem and handlebar.


0

Researching on this myself, the main reasons I've found is that more surface (road) is better for power transmission and more comfortable on longer rides, which you would also want on MTB but road cleat can be inutilized with mud or just natural soil not tarmac, so you could have problems stepping with road shoes on a MTB track terrain then trying to reclip ...


1

This year (age 25) I decided to start road biking having never even sat on anything but a MTB. I got persuaded into trying out a used CX first as an introduction to a more road bike geo and soon got into it. Have since bought a road bike too and absolutely love it. I started doing 20 mile rides once a week, I wasn't getting anywhere with it, but was happy ...



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