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Bicycle helmets are certified for the types of impacts that one would encounter while having an accident on a bicycle. Motorcycle helmets need to be able to endure much more, because riders are going much faster and have more momentum should they crash. Professional road racers ride much faster than the average cyclist (25 mph to 28 mph on flat terrain, in ...


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Yes to all the issues plus heat lack of ventilation comfort heavy and you are not sitting upright like on a motorcycle sight blocking you are in a more bent position even a mountain bike visor can block your vision on a road bike safety the weight can put more stress on your neck in a fall That said some bicycle helmets are safer than others. Not ...


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no. it doesn't help and will just make you uncomfortable with a lot of heat and i imagine its quite heavy which will put strain on your neck. you could maybe try a downhill helmet but really a road helmet is designed for safety of road cyclists. it does provide adequate protection, unfortunately i know this from experience. there are also goggles for those ...


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There are some assumptions in your question that make it next to impossible to answer. Braking is not a static operation. The friction of any wheel is directly proportional to the weight currently being supported by that wheel. As you brake the effective "weight" moves from the both wheels to almost entirely on the front wheel. The harder you brake ...


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Don't worry about equal torque. The front wheel will do as much as ninety percent of the work on a maximum stop. You will learn to modulate the rear to prevent lock-up. Equal pressure will be fine for normal stops.


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Assuming the same force applied by the cylinder and the same materials, with the same pad size, the larger rotor will have a larger "lever arm" and be more "effective", in proportion to the diameter.


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Should work. Put a new chain on. New chain as a worn chain will wear the cassette as it is stretched and does not match up. If the chain is severely worn it may even jump. Chain is cheaper and should be replaced unless it is almost new. A cassette will typically last 2-3 chains. If you sometimes use 28 then why are you giving that up? Is a closer ...


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I've built pretty similar bike recently (5800 groupset, chinese frame), here's the list of tools used: 2-14Nm torque wrench with a set of hex heads. Without it you might crush carbon fiber parts. Hex keys set. Phillips screwdriver. Used only for derailleur adjustment. Bottom bracket tool that came with SM-BB6800. If you didn't get one, make sure you buy ...


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The COMPLETE set will likely cost more than 3x the cost of your frame and parts. The tool to prepare a bottom bracket is almost 500 bucks all by itself. So I'm not going to answer "the COMPLETE set", especially because your copy/paste wall of text doesn't indicate all of the exact specifications for all your parts, which is needed to know exactly which ...


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Individually tools are expensive. And some (very) expensive tools you would only use once or a few times are not worth buying. Like Park or Pedros and buy a kit. It seems like a lot but $200 - $400 is a good starter kit. Then just fill in with specialty tools or pay to have the work done. Too many people don't use a torque wrench but with nice bikes ...


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Tools will be dependent on the standards of the bike. A overview would be: General bike stand grease carbon paste torque wrench Headset tools to chase and face head tube bearing press crown race setting tool steerer cutter Drive Train tool to chase and face bb bb bearing press or bb spanner chain breaker cassette tool cable cutters cable ...


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Yeah, the greatest compatibility issues are with the shifting. I've ran into issues with my conversion. The V-brakes can actually work with the road wheels and brifters, but you have to have trued wheels and a very small gap between the brake pads and the wheels. This makes it so that you also cant use the brake release for the V-brakes unless you file the ...


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There really isn't much required to make a MTB into a formidable city bike. The obvious thing is to change tires. But I wouldn't actually recommend to go for something skinny just something not knobby. Skinny tires offer very little advantage but absorb a lot less of the bumps encountered in city driving which makes them less comfortable and put the wheels ...


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Competitive Cyclist has a lot of information on fitting your bike including an interactive measurement calculator. - http://www.competitivecyclist.com/Store/catalog/fitCalculatorBike.jsp A more in depth fit guide is here. http://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/bikefit/2011/11/knee-pain/ Educating yourself is important, but you probably need to have a good ...


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I would suggest a serious conversation with your local bike shop(s). Do your research, identify what you want, and ask them to do a bike fitting and order the correct size for you. The idea is to encourage them to invest in you while you invest in them. They may want a deposit up front. But if you can convince them to get what you want, you have started a ...


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BMX levers work well. Tektro makes some decent ones, too. Just buy a pair and have a spare, or try and sell the second one on Craigslist if you really don't want to hold onto it.


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A Diatech Dirty harry lever will fit - most bmx brake levers can be used. Dirty harry lever has got good cable pull and it's hard wearing as it was originally designed for bmx. I've seen lots of people riding fixed using this lever Dirty Harry BMX lever


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The Polar 200 user manual says that the speed sensor and the cycling computer must be no more than 30-40cm apart. The cadence sensor attaches to the frame, near the pedals. You could test how far away the speed sensor will transmit by just moving the computer away from the bike with the front wheel spinning. If it works at 1 meter distance, then putting ...


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Riding at 30kph average for 3 hours, in a hilly area is a solid effort. Assuming your pack riding skills are sufficient, you will also likely do fine in in a club ride that averages 30-40kph (but see the pack riding primer below). Club rides will have a faster pace than what you are riding now, but you will also be working a lot less (about 30% less) at any ...


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Everything is relative. For 99% of the population 30kph for 3 hours would be amazing. For a male A grade club rider it would be an off day. For a female A grade club rider it's not bad for a solo training ride. About bunches Sometimes an ad hoc bunch forms in a popular road. These can be dangerous - you don't know the experience level of these people, ...


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Whether your numbers are descent depend on who will answer. I've never riden road so I find those numbers descent, but some people who ride road may tell you that those numbers are mediocre. If you want to find out how you compare against others (and your self) in parts of that ride I suggest that you start using strava. Used wiselly it's a great tool for ...


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I have a fixed gear and I don't find the rear brake useless. I actually Find it quite hard to skid the rear wheel with just the pedals unless I'm riding on wet roads. Personally, I also really like riding on the hoods, and I would leave the brakes they way they are. I would also leave on the drop bar levers because getting to a mountain bike style brake from ...


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I grew up riding steel lugged Cromoly framed road bikes from the 1980s. I still do. Mid range to high end steel framed bikes are getting much harder to find now since they really stopped building and selling them over 20 years ago. So buy one quick before they start demanding competetive "vintage classic" prices. The bike manufacturers are SERIOUS JERKS ...


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Edit: frame is BB94 not 386 Your hollowtech bb wouldn't work as you correctly identified you'd need BB386 pressfit bottom bracket, (see exploded diagram below)you'd just need to make sure the bb you choose is compatible with your chainset and yes ideally you'd need a bottom bracket press to fit this or alternatively your lbs would fit it. You'd need ...


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You should see this page about installing and adjusting caliper brakes. As others mentioned, look out for the reach. Also, pay attention to whether you need recessed or traditional nutted mounts.


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One thing to look out for is the size of the drop from the bolt securing the brake to the frame, and the brake blocks, to ensure the new brakes will fit in such a way that the blocks line up with the rims. Probably if you have a newish bike, then any new brakes you buy will be of the same dimension as new brakes. But it's worth making sure they'll fit - ...


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Well, 105/Ultegra are pretty high to put on a BSO or BSO priced thing (and the brakes will cost more than the BSO). I'd probably go with 20 dollar Tektros. Generally, they are all short-pull brakes so you should be fine with all of them. Shimano has some New Super SLR cable pull, which you can pair with standard short pull brake levers, but Shimano wants ...


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The last post is correct about two meanings for compact: sloping top tube as one meaning and a compact crank (smaller chainrings) as a second meaning. A third meaning also exists - or used to exist: a bike built around smaller 650C wheels. Cannondale used to market their 650C-wheeled road bikes as compact frames.


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I practice XC, DH, Touring and Urban Commuting types of cycling, and have been using cleated shoes since 2002. By now I recognize several advantages of foot retention systems, even thoug I haven't used pedal straps. I will share someof the advantages I have found, as I assume they arethe same as well used straps. For XC on rough terrain and DH, they simply ...


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It may not have anything to do with aerodynamics, but your gear ratio. The website for the Merida Cyclocross 3 does not list the specifications, but the Merida 4 does indicate that, like most cyclocross bikes, it comes with a compact crankset, with the largest chainring at 46 teeth. You should be able to stick with the group, but you will need to be ...


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It helps those who have a disability that causes the foot to come off the pedal or keeping it in the safe natural position. I know its not safe for me to ride my mountain bike without it since my stroke last summer. It is a device created to help those with physical disabilities to be able to ride a bike.


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My first real road bike was around $1300 - so you are on the right track as far as spending. You do have to pony up to get a decent ride and components. I bought a Bianchi, and the dealer is an hour away. I haven't had any issues, but now that I look back I should have bought a bike where I live, so I have dealer support and can get parts/merchandise ...


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I am in the same bandwagon, being dropped at high speed flat cruising, though I was looking for different suspects (pedals, clothes...). For aerodynamics I would expect having broad shoulders or narrow, for instance, to have more effect than what road - CX differences can imply. Even wider handlebars would have more significance than frame geometry ...


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On a cyclocross your CD (drag coefficient is not much different). You are the same basic shape. It is a little taller so you have a bit more more frontal area Are you sure you are the same weight and power? Would any of them be willing to swap bikes and test. I get dropped on rides on my street CX but it is because I am just not as strong. Based on ...


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The most common way is to use a "Chain Wear Indicator Gauge" tool. (google for product pages). If you don't have access to (or don't want to buy) one, you can use a ruler: http://sheldonbrown.com/brandt/chain-care.html


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Try GooGone (citrus based) or dish soap. In my experience one of those will get rid of the grease.


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I'd spray the area with a stain remover/detergent something like vanish maybe add a little bicarb of soda for an extra bit of abrasiveness. Then use a sander with a medium/fine grit sandpaper. to get the grease off. With a bit of luck you will not have to take it all the way down through the coats of paint. Then once removed give it a good wipe down If ...


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Probably best to start with something mild and work to more harsh until you find something that works. It's probably also best to test in a non-conspicuous area on the same wall just in case something unexpected happens. You can start with just soap and water, and see how that does.Then try dish soap. If that doesn't work, you could try the magic eraser ...


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I am using Acetone. It dissolves all kinds of paints, varnishes and stuff. For rusty parts and oxidized terminals WD-40 is the answer. Good luck !


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Crank preload is there to ensure that cranks are not over tightened so that they cause premature failure of the bearings. It allows the cranks to be "finger tightened" prior to the pinch bolts been done up to the right torque. It's a way of ensuring the spacing is correct on the crank axle.


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Looks a lot like an old Free Spirit road. Note the fork crown, the weld quality around the head tube, the attachment of the rear dropouts and the single-piece bottom bracket.


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First and formost: If you're out of shape, no amount of equipment will remedy that. If that is the case you can safely ignore all of the below and go work on getting into shape. The notion that clipless pedals have no benefit is simply wrong. There is a reason pro riders use clipless pedals to race. Yes, the majority of your pedaling power is achieved in ...


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As others have said, I think you would adjust to a drop bar with a little practice. Most of the time you will ride with hands on the top bar anyway (make sure the brakes are positioned so you can still reach them from this position). In my experience drop bars come into their own when you are going fast and/or into the wind, you will quickly realise that ...


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Thanks all for the more elaborate answers, I can't vote up. I see it simpler now. It is the combination of introvertion, wanting to fit in, and the main step to fit in involving a good quantity of money I suppose. So possibly pedals and some clothes would be an intermediate step. My shifters are indexed, though in the frame, not sure the year actually, but ...


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Forget the peer pressure and do whatever the hell you want. Your reluctance to spend money is wise. It's a wisdom that many people lack. But if you are gonna spend money, then here are my suggestions, in order of importance. Bike shorts. If you ride more than 20 miles at a time, they'll definitely make your ass happier. Gloves. Indexed shifting system ...


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It may be trial and error but you can get a fit that works. What I did for a starting point is to measure my flat bar bike that I found comfortable. With the bikes sitting on the wheels, I measured the saddle height and the handlebar height. I then measured the length from the saddle to the bar center. With those measurements I set up the drop bar bike as ...


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I have never had professional fitting - just adjusted until it felt right. I am sure a professional fitting would be nice but I just did not want to spend my money on one. A road bike might not be the best bike for you. In a drop bar consider cyclocoss or light touring. Some companies have a drop bar "commuter". They are going to have bigger tires and ...


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Peer pressure is often a combination of things feeling different to the "norm". This is really lack of confidence to do your own thing. well-meaning advice and comments that can reinforce the first point. As Alex said in his answer, 99% of people are friendly. So such advice and comments are well-intentioned. being new to a group. Many people have a ...


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The question, mainly, would be, do you feel there is a definite peer pressure around this things? There is undoubtably fashion in a lot of cycling, but there there is in everything. Peer pressure would depend on the group. or a definite selling interest from shops? Yes, but then, that's why they're there. have you ridden with no uniform on ...



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