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1

What parts are you willing to replace? You can't get smaller than 34 in the front w/o replacing the crankset with some kind of MTB crank. You'll likely need to replace your front derailleur as well, and there are issues with indexed shifting that you'll need to figure out. You can't get larger than at most 32t in the back w/o replacing the rear ...


0

If your frame and bottom bracket allow it, you could install a mountain bike crank with 42/28 chainrings (maybe Shimano XT). Combined with an 11/32 cassette, that would make climbing really easy. For the last 3 years, my only bike has been a 29er MTB with a 2x10 drive train and a top gear of 36-11. That's enough for me even on road rides, even when riding ...


1

At some point it becomes quicker to push a bike up the hill than ride. Don't let ego override common sense. However, in your specific case where its a hilly circuit, a lower gear makes a lot of sense and will help you build fitness and climbing strength (and save your knees). If at some stage the lower gear is no longer needed, you can always go back to you ...


1

If you're replacing the whole crankset and BB, then any 9-speed double crankset should work. The chain width for 9-speed systems is the same for all makes (not the case for 10 or 11 speed). But before you do that, I'd look around and see if you can replace just the left arm. Any crank designed for the Shimano "outboard bearing" BB should work (those are ...


0

You may well get a bargain like @Klaster_1 mentions in your comments. If you did want to buy a new crank set that behaves exactly the same, you could get anything that matches the same specifications: Bolt Circle Diameter, the teeth count (in your case 34/50 if you're replacing that sora one) ensure that its got the right shape hole for the bottom ...


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Got through 2 Continental Sport and three other tyres in about 4 years, which is about 20,000 km. Three had a hole in the sidewall, one had disintegrating rubber with viable threading, and one actually exploded!


1

Fly Pedals came out with the best version of a clipless pedal adapter. Works with every kind of clipless pedal, and the best part is they have a lifetime warranty. They sell on flypedals.com but shipping is cheaper on Amazon


0

Some advice to get you a little closer to an answer: Think about what kind of riding you want to do, and on what kind of roads/trails. Just smooth paved roads, or some dirt/gravel trails in parks ? If you want to ride on all kinds of surfaces, I would recommend a bike that can use tires at least 35mm wide. You can get different/wider tires later, but ...


0

I wrap inward and use a 3 figure eights or outward and use 2. This sets it up so the tape is wrapping towards the rider for the tops. I also use upside down electrical tape below the grifters and near the drops. I don't use the press in plugs if I can find the screw type compression plugs so the tape at the ends is a must. It also makes starting easier. ...


0

You should visit your local bike shop with non-commissioned staff. Bikes are like cars and WILL require service after sale. You should start by picking a bike shop and establishing a relationship. A good bike salesman should be able to take what you are willing to spend, how and where you plan to ride and translate that into a good choice from their ...


1

I changed mine with 11-28 to 11-32. It makes a big difference. I can climb uphills quite easily now. Also I like the "Spin to Win" idea, and my new cassette makes me to spin more. I strongly recommend for 11-34 or 11-32.


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Check out this video by GCN "Global Cycling Network" --> How To Adjust Your Front Derailleur Their channel is VERY helpful! Hope you find what you need there ;-)


1

It would be GREAT if you could try both, as several people mentioned here. Or if the shop can provide bike-fitting with an expert, that would be excellent. In general theory is not always right when it comes to bike sizing, you have to try by yourself. In all cases, here are some notes: Assuming that it doesn't differ with you which 'mode' you want to ...


1

The two clicks are just one shift. You can do a half shift from the big ring to the small ring by pressing the downshift paddle about halfway. This is to keep the chain from rubbing when you are in a low gear in the back and the big gear in the front. This half shift is known as "trim". So two clicks up for a full shift into the big ring, two clicks down for ...


1

At your weight I would size up to 25mm tires and run lower pressures. High pressure does not corner better than lower pressure especially in wet. Lower pressure permits more of the tire to engage the pavement as contact patch as does a more supple casing. I weigh 150-160 and ride 700x23 racing clinchers at 75-90 psi. Also new tires can have a film on them. ...


0

I am in a similiar position. I can stand over the cross-bar alright but its a bit of a stretch to the handle bars. I adjusted the seat and that felt alright. I just tried reversing the seat post so that the curve goes forward. I'll be cautious. The seat points up more than I would like but my initial impression is that this will work. I have also thought ...


7

I currently ride on Rubino Pro Slick tires, and have used various Vittoria tires for decades. The Vittoria Rubino tires you are using have similar wet grip to what I use (dry grip will be the same). The pressures you quote are good. I get the impression that both incidents occurred in the same corner. If that is the case then I would strongly suspect oil ...


1

Depends on the trails and the type of riding and how big of tires you can put on the road bike. Based on frame and brakes you are probably limited to 28mm or 30mm. Still a lot better than 25mm. If you are dealing with sand and/or big sharp rocks then 30mm is not enough. As for mud just don't ride mud. Mud need excess clearance. So you might as ...


0

I had been communing on a fixie for a couple of years after switching from a hardtail mountain bike. It felt so fast and wonderful at first. But I ended up getting a road bike after a while and then loved communiting on it. I have since put a rack on the fixie and put a 3 speed internal gear hub on the back and it really serves me well. Sometimes coming home ...


1

You might be better off with one of the new bikes coming out with "gravel" or "all-road" geometry and clearance for ~40c tires. They're intended for the type of riding you describe. Current examples include the Raleigh Tamland and Willard, Salsa Warbird, All-City Space Horse, and Kona Rove. These bikes tend to have lower bottom brackets and longer ...


2

Personally, if your road frame is an out-and-out road bike - I would say you will be faced with several issues. strength of your frame Not only will this stress your frame - it may also fatigue the frame. And may cause sudden and catastrophic failure. tyre clearance Most road frames will not take a tyre greater than 28mm. Some no more than 25mm. ...


7

These are referring to pad spacers. They essentially increase or decrease the amount of motion you have when moving the brake levers. See page 16 of the following PDF for a better diagram: Shimano Brake Levers User Guide


0

Not mentioned is rim width - which is just as critical as the issue of wider tyres. A wider tyre on a narrow rim provides comfort and grip but not a lower rolling resistance. I think this was measured in a recent issue of Cyclist magazine (UK). Manufacturers are now producing rims which are in the range or 21-23mm external width. With a wide rim ie 23mm ...


0

So I'm a newbie in the bike world. I had a purchased a Trek Cross-rip bike with semi-slick bike tires 700 x 32c. I got tired of everyone passing me on this one asphalt trail. Several months later I purchased 700 x 23c tires. What a difference! I was able to travel 4-5 miles faster with the narrower width. That's all I know and can contribute. Hope that helps ...


1

There are only really two things. First, as you identify, there is the issue of gradients. If you think that difference goes away if you just "man up", good luck with that. Even if you had the leg power (most of us don't, we'd end up pushing the bike and likely mashing our knees in the process), it would be very difficult to select one gearing that would be ...


3

Get the biggest. The down side is some bigger spacings. If money is an issue consider used. You have the option to not use a gear you do have. But you can't use a gear you don't have. Cassettes wear out. If you find yourself rarely using the 34 and/or 32 then get tighter for the next. Start with the biggest for a data point. If that is not ...


6

For grades beyond 10% having a gear that you can spin at the rate you can climb makes a big difference. Only you can know exactly what gear that should be. If you can find a gear ratio tool that displays speeds for a given gear, wheel size and rpm. This one seems pretty good. http://www.bikecalc.com/cadence_at_speed Then think about your typical speeds ...



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