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1

I am 183 cm tall and ride size 55. I have relatively short legs, so I had a custom frame with longer than usual top tube made. For a person with more usual proportions a normal 56 would probably be fine. As already said, it depends on the exact dimensions and angles of that particular model.


1

I am 175cm tall. I rode a road bike recently with a 56cm frame. I it had been any bigger I wouldn't have been able to ride it safely. 54 or 52cm would have been a better fit. I suspect that a 54cm frame would be a bit small for you, but not painfully so. Get a 56 if you can.


1

If you want to make a very large flange hub (to produce shorter spoke lengths and produce a stiffer wheel), bonding a large metal flange to a carbon hub shell is not a bad idea. If you try doing it with a one piece design, the larger shell (coming from the larger flange) would likely make the hub heavy. Making the shell out of carbon instead has the the ...


0

Does a carbon brake lever perform better than an aluminum? I am pretty sure a carbon hub is purely for weight and not performance. Frame and fork is a case of carbon also has performance benefits. Carbon has flex and damping characteristics that many people prefer over other materials. In a hub you just want rigid and strength - I think.


2

Which hubs are you thinking about? It would be very hard to make a carbon hub flange strong enough to withstand spoke tension, assuming you are building a wheel with conventional spokes. Most carbon hubs I have seen use aluminum flanges, and the few which offer significant weight savings are ultralight equipment not for general use. Carbon probably won't ...


32

The short answer is: not that difficult. The long answer requires some explanation. The equations of motion for a rider on a bicycle are well-understood if not always well-known. The power needed to propel a bicycle on firm flat ground (as on a velodrome) varies approximately with the cube of speed. Thus, to double your speed, you would need to increase ...


9

Road typically has a smaller range. A road bike will typically come with a short cage derailleur. Where a mountain will typically come with a medium or long cage derailleur. Yes the mount on the freehub is compatible. It is about the range capacity of the derailleur.


2

It seems like the first question to answer here is: freewheel vs. cassette. The, assumed, age of the wheel and being a 6-speed does suggest that it's a freewheel. However, even if it is an original wheel from the late '70s it is not out of the question that it could be a cassette (at least according to Wikipedia). Looking at the parts, I see several clues ...


0

I think your best bet is to go visit your local shop and ask them to remove it. Many freewheels look similar to cassettes when disassembled. They drive in a similar method with indexed notches to align the different sprockets. I believe yours is a freewheel. The lock ring threads being on the outside are one hint it may be a freewheel. As such there are a ...


0

For pure road-riding: Neoprene covers over normal road-shoes are the best as long as you don't have to put a foot down too often. The cleats are prone to clogging in snowy conditions. But then you wouldn't certainly get on a bike. On the other hand, ankle hugging covers keep the rain running down the legs into the shoe, which could happen with insulated ...


0

In this Technical FAQ from VeloNews (http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/05/bikes-and-tech/technical-faq/technical-faq-tire-grip-wet-conditions_328827), several tire manufacturers answer the questions: do slick tires have less traction than treads in wet weather? does lowering tire pressure help in wet weather? Specialized, Challenge, Vittoria, and ...


4

Have you recently replaced a tire or tube? If so, then the tire may not be properly seated. Remove the wheel, hold it in your lap lying flat, and rotate the wheel around looking at the edge of the rim and tire. You are looking for a "low spot" where the tire appears to "disappear" down into the wheel. It will be slight, but it doesn't take much. My old road ...


0

Really, the only thing you can do is investigate each individual part as you go along. With drivetrain parts you'll have to investigate how well they work with other drivetrain parts. E.g., if you change the derailleur, does it work with the shifters? Is the cassette compatible with the derailleurs? Etc. Try searching the site for stuff like drivetrain ...


1

First you need to figure out what type of bicycle you are looking for. Is it a road bike, mountain bike, hybrid, or something else. If you can't answer that question you need to do basic research to figure that out. Once you understand what type of bike you need, you also have to figure out what size of bike "should" fit you. The only way to see if a used ...


1

Generally speaking there are two types of bikes for sale on Craigslist. The first type is one with a manufacturer name, model name, and date of manufacture. The second type is the bike that doesn't have those identifiable characteristics. These second-type bikes might be called custom. If you have a manufacturer, model, and year then you can use ...


0

This is a mighty old posting that I am responding to almost 5 years later, but I thought it would be helpful for those who are looking to overhaul their BB and thinking of moving to the external. For the most part that is captured here, External hubs are at least 30% lighter than the internal hubs. Because the bearing cups are outside the BB shell, it ...


1

I would say that most people on Craigslist would be willing to let you give it a test ride, I mean it's similar to buying a car. Just, as I always tell people, meet with the person in a very public space. Much safer place. As for what to look for, I would do a little research into exactly what you are expecting to use the bike for. Figure out the kind of ...


1

I think one point has been kind of glossed over: There is a limit to what sort of turn you can make at 20 mph. The force available from static friction must be greater than the centrifugal force you're generating in making the turn -- the sharper the turn, the greater the centrifugal force, for a given speed. If centrifugal force exceeds frictional force ...


3

The short answer You say you usually keep them around 90psi. I think it's a key point that you don't say that you checked them and they were definitely at 90 psi (6 atm). Cornering at speed is always dangerous. You need your tires to be hard so that they do not deform, and you need proper technique. Your tires need to be at least 90 psi. Regarding ...


0

If you are asking only tyre pressure, I would put 90 psi minimum riding it wet condition. Running a lower pressure increase the risk of snake-bite puncture, side wall split/cut. However, more important factors regarding traction upon cornering are: Operation of the rider inappropriate for road condition. For example, 20 mph on sharp wet corner bend, panic ...


2

The real difference to look for is the axle width and connection method. A "standard" road bike has a 130mm/10mm rear axle and 100mm/9mm front axle that both use a standard quick release. If a set of wheels matches those dimensions and has disk brake compatible hubs, then any difference between road/cyclocross disk will only be in the various details of ...


0

Road wheels will be more likely to be more aero with aero bladed spokes, and possibly 4 less of them. Deeper section rims are more common on road wheels than cx wheels too out on the start lines.


1

You have a couple types of failures. Lose traction Lower pressure will have a slightly larger contact patch Fold / Flex The tire can flex or even fold over from the centrifugal force A higher pressure tire is more rigid An under inflated tires will jump around - not good You can only lower the pressure so far before you start loose side to side strength ...


1

Typical BMX brakes are u brakes and require 990 posts. Road bikes don't have these posts (nor do mountain bikes or hybrids). If you can't see the posts look at the position of the posts. U brake posts are above the rim. Cantilever posts (your v bakes) are below the rim. V brakes can stop you. You might need better brakes or better pads but I bet that some ...


0

I am a big guy at 100 KG, (was bigger 120 when I started biking) and we have one advantage while braking - which is ballast, or weight transferance. The most braking you can do is 100% on the front to the point where the rear wheel has almost zero weight. Any more braking and you're over the handlebars and/or the rear wheel is going some direction its not ...


7

Not easily. V-brake levers pull twice as much cable as a calliper brake levers, so you'll not be able to swap them without swapping the levers too, and these are often attached to the shifters, so you'd end up swapping an awful lot of parts. Additionally V-brakes are mounted to a pair of bosses on the seat stays & fork legs whilst calliper brakes are ...


2

Nitto makes a tall quill stem called the Technomic that will give you about 160 mm of extension above the minimum insert line. I've seen them in the Rivendell, Harris Cyclery, and Velo Orange catalogs. The Rivendell one is fancy and polished and costs more. There are also extenders that allow you to use a standard quill stem. They aren't pretty but they get ...


0

The answer depends in large part on what type of riding you will be doing. On the road, are you planning to join local group rides? If so, what pace do they ride? When you say "rough trails", do you mean rocky/rooty singletrack? Or, poorly maintained gravel roads? How much elevation is there in your area? Personally, I would pick a cyclocross bike that ...


0

Go for the 1200 CX bike. Reasons for this I would give: You can swap the wheels/tyres on a CX bike and its effectively a road bike. With CX tyres on you can ride the majority of the off-road terrain you'll come across A $400 MTB is unlikely to be very good, unless you find a second hand bargain MTB's are terrible on road I've got a CX bike which I ride ...


26

It can be considered "impolite" by roadies, but not because of the bike you were riding or the fact you didn't take a pull (although I am sure some will argue for this). The main reason random drop-in riders are generally frowned upon are because of: the dangers associated with unpredictability of a new rider lack of insurance coverage Potential ...


7

This sounds like it was a very casual interaction. There's nothing wrong with what you did, but it would have been more polite to say hi and ask if they minded you drafting them for a few minutes. Even in a casual situation like that, be careful not to interfere with their rotation or their pace. IE, if you're not going to take a turn at the front, drop ...


7

For those who subscribe to the rules: "Rule 19: Introduce Yourself If you deem it appropriate to join a group of riders who are not part of an open group ride and who are not your mates, it is customary and courteous to announce your presence. Introduce yourself and ask if you may join the group. If you have been passed by a group, wait for an invitation, ...


5

As @Daniel has commented, and I agreed, you probably have a bike fit problem. We cannot be sure; the only way to find out for sure is to get a professional fitting done. Having said that there are still a few things you can try. While you say you try to adjust my hand positions, what positions do you use most? ... The Allez handlebar setup is one I ...


3

I want a bike that will allow to me ride on the road and on the rough trails I guess we can't be sure what you mean by "rough trails", but if you're talking about what I call "rough trails", a CX bike just isn't going to do it. i don't want the relaxed geometry. I want to go fast. Relaxed geometry and high speed often go together off-road (think ...


2

First I would not characterize a $1200 CX as low end. Yes since they are typically sold for race the starting point is around $1200. But overall I would not call that a low end bike. It is going to have solid frame and mid range components. I would take $1200 CX with knobby tires on the trail over $400 mountain. Not going to have a front shock on the ...


1

If you ride alone you could try clip-on aerobars. With these you basically get rid of all strain on your hands and better aerodynamics


0

Head for a hill and ride up it as often as you can. Listen to your body when it comes to sleep and nutrition. Ride at least once a week for more than an hour to build your stamina. It's just like any other exercise, you start slow but to get better you always have to increase the difficulty. You can make it harder by going more often and going further ...


0

120psi is too much for most riders. For an average weight rider (160lbs or so) on average width tires (23-25mm), 90-100psi is all you should need. I usually run a good bit lower than that (80-85psi), but I'm only 145lbs and ride 26-28mm tires.


2

I see two questions here... First, will you benefit from a road bike? If you will ride it more than you are riding the mountain bike, then yes. That will depend on where you live (are there good roads or paved trails for a road bike), who you ride with, etc. I do most of my riding on my road bike because I live near an excellent paved trail and there are ...


3

Some things you can do to alleviate hand/wrist pain: Raise handlebars and/or shorter stem Padded gloves Double layer of handlebar tape or gel pads under the tape Move hand location frequently between cross bar, hoods, corners and drops (for me at least, when my handlebars are higher I tend to spend more time in the drops) If you want to maintain your ...


7

Regarding part 1: I'd start by raising the stack height a bit so that you lean on your wrists with less weight; your position will be more upright and less aerodynamic. Along with this, make sure your saddle is properly adjusted for height. More importantly you should try strengthening your abdominal muscles. With a stronger core you will be able to ...


3

Is the question about non-stop cycling or just riding over several days or weeks? For non-stop cycling it’s less about starvation and more about the maximum power you can get from burning body fat. For the Race Across America the record (without any food restrictions) is 27km/h average over 4860km in 7d 16h. Since stopping and sleeping is allowed (though ...


5

You will go further and faster on a road bike for the same effort. You go further and faster on a better (i.e. more expensive) bike. Training is not about going further and faster for the same effort, its about putting in more effort. So, will a road bike make a difference - only if you will put in more effort on the road bike than the MTB. If the idea of ...


0

This is a difficult question since it partly is reliant upon your excess weight and the speed you are riding. But as a general rule no more than 10 miles before you eat the first time and every five thereafter. You have to keep food in the assembly line because it takes an hour or so to get into your bloodstream and it is slow to spread. So if you start a ...


0

This is a standard English manufactured sport bike probably from the mid-60's. It used freewheel type hubs and from what I can see you appear to have modified the rear wheel with a seven speed freewheel. The original rear triangle spacing was probably 125 mm and the seven speed uses a 127 mm spacing. Usually someone would re-space the rear triangle and put ...


5

Goals Without them, you don't know where you're going, and don't know when you got there. So set some goals. For example, a 100 km (60 mi) ride by the end of the year. As Kibbee said, find others to ride with. Ride where you see others ride, stop where they stop, and chat. Or find a local club. Be prepared to move on if the people or club are not meeting ...


0

120 psi (8.3bar) is good, just make sure to check it every second day or so. Road tires lose pressure fast. As for training: Bicycling is mostly a matter of kilometers (or hours) per week at some intensity. Of course proper regeneration, good nutrition (enough protein etc.) and structured training with intervals, endurance training etc. etc. help. For ...


2

Sounds like you already have a decent pace for somebody starting out. Upping the tire pressure is a good idea, but make sure to not go too far beyond what is recommended on the sidewall of the tire. 120 psi might be a bit too high. In order to get quicker and build your endurance you should ride more. You can do things like intervals to try and increase ...


1

Ultegra is still hollowtech II. It seems like the Defy 2 in the UK has a pressfit bottom bracket for hollowtech II cranks, while in the US it has an usual threaded hollowtech II bottom bracket. In any case, you need a hollowtech II compatible bottom bracket, which you already have (Tiagra is Hollowtech II only). Just remove the current crankset and put in ...


2

Cyclocoss will tend to be wider to accommodate the wider tires used in cyclocross. And tend to be sturdier. Are you buying the wheels for a road or cyclocross?



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