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1

You're doing much more in terms of manoeuvrability on a 'cross bike so you tend to go for a less aggressive geometry which in non-custom frame translates to generally a tiny bit smaller. So if you ride a 52/53 standard frame on road you'll probably be looking at 51/52 for cross.


0

A road bike that does not stop quickly & predictably could be very dangerous. Poorly adjusted brakes, an untrue wheel, damaged cables can contribute to poor braking performance. Contaminated braking surfaces can render brakes almost useless. Oil, grease, wax are the usual suspects.


3

No. They are designed to brake as well as possible without being unnecessarily overkill. The reason why the brakes are a lot less powerful than mountain bike brakes is because they don't require as much force to lock a road bike wheel. That's it. As long as you can lock the wheel, your brakes are powerful enough. You would put the best hydraulic mountain ...


1

Assuming no decals or identifying markings, call Cinelli with the serial number which will be stamped into the bottom bracket shell. Otherwise, with no pics and no description, telepathy is the next best option. I don't posses that skill.


3

Your experience differs from mine. I have drop bar bikes with both cantilevers and V-brakes (which are used to clear large tires) and dual pivot side pulls (which manufacturers prefer to use when tire clearance is not a problem, even though there is no particular weight advantage) Using the same shape of brake levers for both, it's the dual pivot brakes that ...


2

I had a similar issue last year. The threads on the frame to take the bottom bracket were too worn to hold the bottom bracket in place. A bike mechanic should be able to confirm this for you (for no fee). After some research I found two solutions, one of which is considerably cheaper than the other: 1: bike frame specialists / frame refurbishers can re cast ...


2

You have to remember speeds are higher for road bikes, and kinetic energy is a function of speed squared. Riding at 15 mph compared to 10 means the brakes have to get rid of more than twice as much energy. We could get technical and start talking about different wheel diameters and tire weights and all that, but the point is, you have to compare apples to ...


0

Something else to consider is that many bike shops will offer a seat trial program. You can pay a fee to use multiple seats and find the one that is right for you. The initial fee you paid will be applied to the purchase price of the saddle that you choose.


10

I'm not sure "designed" is the correct word, evolved comes much closer. Current dual caliper brakes actually stop a lot better than previous single caliper sidepulls. There has always been a compromise between weight and braking power. The designers have focused on how light they can make a brake that stops "enough". I don't think there has been any effort ...


1

You might consider opting for neither and instead look for a so-called "gravel" or "adventure" bike. Both are relatively new categories, but either could be described as an "all-road" option. They're really road bikes that are meant for paved and unpaved roads. Their advantages over contemporary road bikes include more clearance for larger tires and ...


2

I had a road-bike and swapped it for a cyclo-cross. I'm never going back to a road-bike. For me, the cyclo-cross is just as fast if not faster. The cyclo-cross feels more stable and I feel like I have more control at speed so am prepared to go faster. With the wider tyres I'm not so worried about hitting a bit of rough road or a grate as it'll fly over ...


1

Another factor to keep in mind is the maintenance issue. Riding on gravel roads will flick up dirt on to your chain much faster than riding on sealed surface. You will need to do cleaning and maintenance more regularly and chain and drive train wear will occur quicker. You might find that the total amount of time (riding + cleaning/maintenance) will be less ...


1

I don't really like the title. It is more about selecting a commuting bike. A cyclocross can handle gravel and road hazards and is still built for speed. On the open road cyclocross does not give up much. For the same price level bike cyclosross would be barely heavier, little wider, and a little taller. It would also be geared a little lower. If you ...


14

TL:DR Get the CX Bike, you'll love it! You get three bikes in one, without trading in any noticeable performance on the road. This answer is subjective and based on personal experience, you have been warned: I have a CX bike that is used as a do-it-all bike, and I love it. For almost all aspects that concern any non-professional cyclist a CX is as good, or ...


5

If you are going to use your bike mostly for commuting, I would like to suggest you go for cyclocross. The reasons are: Motorist Hazard: There are always ignorant motorist who think they can save a lot of time by ignoring checking blind spots, appropriate speed at junction, quickly overtake without leaving sufficient space for cyclist. The less time you ...


2

I'll try to make the best out of this question by giving what is hopefully a helpful answer to others. You would be really surprised just how clean you can get synthetic or cork bar tape, even if it's white, with a little bit of orange degreaser. Get a clean, preferably white rag, pour some on, and take one end of the towel in each hand and scrub the tape as ...


2

According to rule 8, your choices are black, white, or try to match it to the blue frame color, which my be difficult.


4

A couple of things to be aware of: Seatposts come in a bizarre array of diameters, so the odds of a seatpost from one bike fitting another is not great. There are maybe 3-4 different schemes for mating seats with seatposts. Most "real" bikes use the scheme where two "rails" under the seat are held by a clamp atop the post, but there are a few other ...


1

There is likely much more variability at the point where the seatpost and frame meet as compared to the point where the seatpost and seat meet. http://sheldonbrown.com/seatpost-sizes.html


9

Almost all saddles will be exchangeable -- there are a few rare (and very expensive ones) you wouldn't encounter unless you were looking for them which can't be exchanged. So yes, almost surely if you buy a new saddle you can use it on another bike. Note that some saddles are marketed as "road" or "mtb" - the mtb ones are possibly more durable, but this ...


4

Training plans are all well and good, but the first goal is to be able to ride 9 hrs. There is no substitute for doing long rides to prepare to do a long ride. In my experience, for just developing pure endurance you get 80-90% of your training effect from a long ride. The rest of your training should be focused around reducing the recovery time to enable ...


0

I am actually in the same situation as you were a year ago! I think I'll go with a carbon bike with ''cheap'' components. I really want a carbon frame but can't afford to buy one with good components so I'll upgrade them later if needed! Is it what you've done?


0

Do 60Kmph or 45+Kmph average for 40 - 60 Km net perhaps 4 times a week on different days, then increment the distance 10Km every week, I did this in winter with an mtb. and I did practice one more thing continuos peddaling (I call it endurance peddaling). it helps a lot in endurance. 2 hills (30 degrees, 200 meters, tarmac) a month helped as well.


3

A perfect book for beginners in training is Joe Friel's "Cyclist's training bible". The main point he makes in his book is training periodization i.e. changing the volume and intensity of training depending on when you want your peak to occur. In your case this is simple as you have a single goal. In general the rule is: low intensity, high volume through ...


0

"As it slowly died, and i bent the rear axle (Don't ask me how, i don't ride it hard) i debated buying a new bike" Hmmm… If the bent axle is the only major problem the bike has (by "it slowly died" I take you to mean that it was developing other less-serious problems too), if I were you I would do an overhaul and continue with the hybrid. I don't know if ...


1

A $200 bike is not good for someone that rides gentle and you want to ride it a little more than gentle. Look used as you will find better values. Go for a bike that is maybe a bit big for you but at 5'8" don't jump to a bike for 6'2". Then there is style of bike. If you want to go fast and bang (jump curbs) then a road bike with some solid ...


2

Most likely not. Most frames with caliper brakes can at a maximum take a 28 or really narrow and slick 30 (assuming a modern short reach caliper). A nobby tire will almost certainly not fit regardless of size. if there's a lot of clearance currently ( > 1cm), I would take it to your lbs and check with them.


3

I would say that whether a bike is Unisex (men's) or women's specific it is of fairly little relevance. What matters more is an individual's fit on an individual bike. Tall people need big bikes, short people need smaller bikes, regardless of gender. As it says here: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/h/option/bikesizeguide#women-bike A women's bike is built to fit ...


0

Naturally you would want to put a women's seat on it. A shop will typically switch our for free. This is a comparable women's in Specialized. DOLCE


2

As a general answer to this kind of question, I recommend that you buy from your local bike shop. While shops can vary, if they seem to provide reasonable service and the price is reasonable, it's worth buying from them for several reasons the profit on your sale will help them stay in business - so they will be there when you need service. many shops ...


3

I sold Specialized bikes for a lot of years, they do make gender specific frames, women's bikes have shorter top tubes relative to the seat tubes, this is because women on average have shorter backs and longer legs than men do, they also come with womens saddles, and sometimes women specific grips (for feminine hands). The Sectour is considered a men's ...



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