New answers tagged

0

IMHO, when you enter any vehicle blink spot, it doesn't matter. Same issue for taller vehicle. They can't see a low profile figure like motorcycle, bicycle, pedestrian,etc. If you aim for safety, you should lights up front and rear even during daylight. Or get a hub dynamo and never worry about charging the battery. A rear mirror if you always cycling in ...


2

Yes - visibility is everything for both the rider and the surrounding things. Here's an example of a road bike in traffic. The effect is exaggerated because camera is on handlebars, but even at head height I didn't see her till the camera did. You can see my body position by the shadow on the left side. Its New Zealand ...


3

Being seen - the higher you are, the more likely you will be seen over a roof top. Clearly some cars are too high or too low for it to make a difference, but the odd car is at a height the difference might be significant. Seeing - in an aero position, its harder to see as much as in an upright. It can be done by actively looking around, but its harder - ...


5

Doing it like the first picture shows is definitely not a good idea. The strap should be the other way round with the buckle as close as possible to the pedal's body. Reason 1: it can be tightened by pulling the end up and released with a the flick of the thumb on the buckle. (The reason for this black plastic end of the buckle) Reason 2: The end of the ...


2

Panaracer Pasela PT are an excellent road/light touring tan sidewall tire, but they're lighter than the Marathon, which is more of a heavy duty loaded touring/urban tire. There's also the Rivendell Ruffy Tuffy, which are decent but I like the Pasela PT more. The Black/Tan version of the Michelin World Tour is in the same genre as the Marathon but not as ...


3

Those are called gumwalls. With this keyword you can easily search for them. Brands I see mounted on my friend's bikes are the likes of bontrager, panaracer, schwalbe, but Id say that most tyre manufacturers have a gumwall offer.


2

This is one of the most common questions from people new to racing. I notice user Rider_X has not responded (yet). If he does then it will be well worth reading. This anwser is drawn from my experience with intense weekly endurance competition (squash), people who race bikes (father, brother, a dozen regular riding buddies, including several at the elite ...


0

Taken from the Team Sky nutritionist's recommendations. Although it is for breakfast the guidelines for what to look for in your pre-race diet still stand. Pre-race: Between waking, and the start of the race (approximately 4-5 hours) 3-4 litres of fluid, from diluted fruit juices, vegetable juices and water. As well as fluid, juices also provide a ...


0

It really depends on your actual condition and how hardcore-racer biker you are. As I am not an expert I will share some common sense hints. For general purposes a sport diet would be fine, so pasta or such a carbon-hidrated food some hours before the race starts. If the race is long, do not forget to drink something water with salt-minerals and take a ...


2

It will need much work and VERY hard to find parts, been there done that after my nice bike was stolen with a crap lock. Just get a UBERKILL LOCK. The thief will not want to mess with your bike and just go to the next lock he sees.


3

@errantlinguist gives some excellent points, but I have a couple to add. Make sure you have 700C wheels not 27" wheels. I have only been able to find a single tire in my LBS to fit 27" wheels. As @errantlinguist mentioned, biffers. This is a huge regression. To the extent, that it changes the way the entire bike feels. I have switched to flat bars ...


15

A (decent) bike from the '90s would not be significantly different† from (a decent) one only a few years old except for a small weight difference and possibly lacking brifters, which are de facto standard on road bikes these days. This statement is of course excepting top-of-the-line superbikes made of carbon fiber and dragon's blood. Check it for stuff ...


0

In terms of weight, it makes no difference either way ( according to this scientific paper - http://www.bmj.com/content/341/bmj.c6801 However there are other resistances to motion that differ between your bikes, namely rolling resistance and air resistance, that will affect performance


3

There are a lot of factors that go into your speed and efficiency, and this switch touches several of them: Rider Position: Typically, a bike with touring geometry will have a slightly longer wheelbase, and lower bottom bracket. Along with other geometry tweeks, the result is that on a touring bike you are likely to be in a slightly more upright position, ...


0

You might succeed with a screw extractor. If you can drill into the head, this will give you purchase. It depends on how hard the bolt head is. I recommend center punching before drilling. Some penetrating oil on the threads might help as well.


1

I expect that when you try to turn the nut you'll rind that the round bolt head is eccentric on the bolt. Side on it looks like the sketch below, and means the bolt won't rotate once it's in the hole. This is quite old school, and they're very easy to manufacture with only fairly basic hand tools. Imagine trying to cut a hexagonal hole into a pedal using ...


7

This picture shows a slightly better angle. You need to first loosen the lock nut slightly, then spin the adjuster barrel until it unscrews right off the threaded rod on the chain. When you re-assemble you reverse that, and have to re-adjust the tension so that it shifts properly.


3

To the last question, a far better order of doing things would have been to disconnect the shifting cable first. The knurled part at the end of cable rotates on the threaded piece at the end of the chain, visible through the hole in the wheel nut. Rotate it to disconnect the cable.


14

They're trying to sell you stuff. More expensive stuff (have you looked at 11 speed consumable (chain+cassette) prices vs 10 speed?). I would not bother upgrading. As groups go to higher and higher speeds, the older stuff gets pushed down to lower component levels. So today's 11 speed 105 group will be next year's (or likely a few years later) Tiagra ...


3

It's possible that during cleaning a grain of sand, for example, has become stuck in the chain causing a stiff link which does not travel cleanly over the cogs. Cleaning chains and cogs often involves a significant amount of moving dirt around before extracting it. A simple test for this is to move the chain through both hands bending every link. You'll ...


2

There are a few possibilities here: 1) Cleaning the cassette took away the gunk keeping a slightly worn cassette from showing. If you use the middle gears most, they may be more worn than the rest. Unlikely, but not impossible. 2) You bent the derailleur hanger or derailleur cage when removing or cleaning. More likely than #1, and easy to test. 3) Check ...


3

The short answer is no. The SPD-SL 3 bolt pattern is larger by several centimeters. An SPD shoe has tread to make it easier to walk in the show off-road and a smaller, 2 bolt cleat mounting pattern. The tread would be in the way of mounting the SPD-SL cleat.


1

I've commuted (central London roads) for 2 years now on the same set of 25mm Gatorskins. I've had only one snakebite (my bad for not paying attention) and never (yes!) had a prick puncture with these tires. I've just (this week) switched to 28mm tubeless (Schwable Pro One). I built these tubeless for the Paris-Roubaix ride (notorious for pinch flats!). I ...


1

Yes! Go for it. What's the worst that can happen? If you don't finish, then you know that you're pushing your limits, and you will have learned more about how to do it better next time. Just make sure you take enough food, some warm/dry clothes, and you know where the bailout options are. I reckon that if you don't know all the answers in advance, ...


3

If you've managed 200 km without problems you can also ride 300 km. As usual don't ride too fast and keep yourself well fed. 1st big leap is usually between 400 km and 600 km, because after 400 km you will (typically) need to sleep.


4

The best way to improve at riding is to ride -- but many people do have limitations on their time that make it difficult to ride as much during the week as they would like. At one end of the spectrum, there is some amount of almost all fitness-building activity that is transferable to cycling fitness. Cycling is mostly an aerobic sport, so vigorously ...


0

Cadence - the faster you can pedal while maintaining a good posture and bike control, the better. The indicator that you're spinning too fast is bouncing in the saddle. If that happens go up a gear, or try to round-off your pedal stroke into a more circular shape. If you have a good steady climb nearby, try doing it in a lower than normal gear, but turning ...


1

Increasing stamina and cadence cannot be trained at the same time. Why not try going to work on your bike instead? It will help you keep fit and it is also a logical thing to do since you do have a nice bike. Plus it will also cost you less than buying ankle weights. For that is already a win-win situation. Or if you don't want to do that. Maybe a bit of ...


1

I doubt you're getting snake bites in a 22mm tyre unless it's very low on air. Even then it's not likely. Snake bites have a distinctive two-hole pattern so you can check. It's more likely that you're getting ordinary punctures. There may be tough 22mm tyres, but most this thin are designed to be light. There are certainly anti-puncture options at 25mm ...


2

This is apparently an informal race where you can set your own rules. So as suggested by criggie in the comments you might be able to agree a rule against drafting. In time trials, riders set off at one minute intervals, and drafting is explicitly banned. If one rider is close behind another I think the rules say they have to either back off or overtake. ...


1

A motorcycle helmet will be too hot and heavy for cycling. Spend $20 USD and get a cheap bicycle helmet - you'll be a lot more comfortable and happy.


5

The best way to make it impossible for him to draft of you is to draft on him instead. You will then probably just end up taking turns. Competitive bike riding is not only about who is the best, but also who is the smartest and who has the best social skills. Or who - indeed - can act the 'meanest' as you mention this word. However I personally think you ...


0

In theory flat. Also if you think about it downhills are more for your bigger gears. It is best to not recover but catch speed as your goal is speed. At least for me climbs require a lot of effort and if you add the effort of going on biggest gear on down hill it is actually mean you are less efficient as if you where going on flat road. Quite thin ...


0

Looks like a 70s/80s single-speed bike, or possibly a 3 speed rear internally geared hub. Will be a steel frame and forks. Those brake calipers look somewhat flimsy, and the plastic saddle is definitely non-original, possibly from a BMX or kids bike. Its also possible it was a derailleur bike in the past but has had parts changed. Unless you know its ...


0

Some ideas - mark the rotor where it rubs. then remove and refit the rotor but turn it 90 degrees relative to the hub. Does it rub in the same place or 90 degrees away? I think you'll find the lump follows the hub, not the rotor. Use a straight edge (like a steel ruler) across the flat of the rotor mount to look for any imperfections - they will be ...


47

In road racing there are lots of way to try and gain an advantage (or not to give others an advantage). Because this is a friendly race, I will break it down into friendly, indifferent and hostile tactics. Update 1: The OP updated their question to make it clear that they were a beginner and the other rider was a more experienced road rider. So I ...


3

A weather dependent strategy is available when there is a stiff crosswind. Your wind shadow (i.e. the place where a drafter would want to ride) is "behind" you from the point of view of the wind you experience. You experience wind from straight ahead because you are going fast, and from the side because of the weather. The combined effective wind will come ...


19

Let the co-worker pass and then draft behind them. It becomes a game of chicken to see who goes first. This is partially why road racing at the professional level is usually done in teams. The team works together letting riders take a turn in the front so that the race moves at a reasonable pace. The other option is to just give a good effort on an uphill ...


4

You can combine strategies from track racing, namely match sprint, and road racing. In match sprint, the racers typically start very slow in order to not give any drafting advantage. This continues until one of the competitors decides that he/she can sprint to the finish line before the other can pass them and attacks. In road racing, a common strategy is ...


2

Yes, all Shimano 8-speed shifters and rear derailleurs except Dura-Ace are compatible. Road and off road front derailleurs have different cable pull, but since both 600 and Claris are road component series, they are compatible too.


1

I think @itsthejash has some good tips but I'd also suggest taking the rotor off the hub and making sure there is no dirt or other material on part of the mounting surface of the hub, thus pushing it out in one spot. Maybe use some cleaner to ensure the surface of the hub and rotor are clean on the faces that meet during mounting. Also - when you engage ...


1

I do both - my road bike is a lightweight lean machine with no mudguards so its fast but terrible in the wet, so dry days only. My wet-day bike is a rigid MTB with full mudguards (fenders) and much better rim brakes. The MTB also has a more upfright seating position so its easier to look around, and puts my head a little higher. Road bikes commute fine, ...


1

Take the plunge and try it! Either you'll find that you don't enjoy it or you'll have discovered a wonderful new aspect to cycling. Regardless, you're only out a race fee. Community The cycling community is just like that of any other sport. You have some people who are pros, those who were, some who wish they were, some who think they are and some who ...


2

I made the decision to ride starting this year in Feb (yes, Toronto in February) but it was then or never. I have never looked back. Only things that I wondered before I started (and what took me longer was): The distance of course as someone already mentioned... What you would wear while riding (linked to the next point) Given my work attire, what would ...


3

Can't see a single reason why not. I am commuting on road bikes since the times of Noah (ok, a bit later) and only being happy for the decision. Used MTB before and it was not as fun as road bike is on roads. There are some interesting issues, such as rugged bottoms of the trousers of your dress suit if you don't clamp them while commuting, also some funny ...



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