New answers tagged

0

Answer Looks like a straight swap (but the proof is always in the doing.) Neither link say what size the wheels are, so assuming the most common 700c size for both and the wheels will fit under the brake bridge. Neither link says anything about spacing, but we can expect the front is 100mm over-locknut because that's standard, and the rear will also be ...


1

Brifters plus quill stem suggests around 1997 or 1998 vintage. The rear brake bridge formed like a front fork, instead of two full seat stays up to the seat post... that's quite unusual. Makes the smallish frame look even smaller. I'd guess its a 7, maybe 8 speed on the rear, can't see in the photos. The front fork has relatively little rake (curve) on ...


1

10 speed works with 10 speed. You will be fine with the chain you have. The major difference being that the one that is made for 3x10 will be a couple links longer generally. Usually this is designated by a number such as 116L where the L stands for links. Width wise you should be fine with any 10 speed chain. 10sp chains are slightly more narrow than a 9sp ...


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From the practical point of view, you will get more tired on ups and downs, but more bored on flat. Downs do not compensate for ups, because they require a lot of concentration and muscle power - your speed is much higher on downhills! You will be very tired after a 30 minute downhill, which never happens on 30 minute flat. In fact, roads where there's very ...


3

There is a tool I know of that solves your problem: OsmAnd (available for free on F-Droid, paid versions on Android Play Store + iOS App Store). If the region has decent coverage with properly mapped highway types, the app's offline routing offers a bicycle mode + the option to avoid unpaved roads. Whether the data coverage is good enough in the region can ...


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I personally use MapMyRide by Under Armour. It can track routes as you just bike along, or you can plan them out first. It also has community routes that others have completed. When planning out your route, it tells you elevation and can also indicate gravel or other materials (dirt).


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There is no tool that I know of that solves your problem for you. The way I solve the problem of finding out what a road is like, is to use Google maps to find a route. then use Street View to check the roads at important points. Of course, if the road is gravel, Street View is probably not available. if the route is not what I want, drag the route ...


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For 5 days with couch surfing and a good weather forecast in the summer you don’t need more than arm and leg warmers. Use your smartphone for navigation (using e.g. osmand). A spare tube, pump and the most basic tools never hurt either. Use a saddle bag or frame bags to carry a short and shirt so you have something to wear when you’re not sitting in the ...


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I know you are supposed to: Resize the chain by from the side that terminates at an inner link, this way when you place the new pin into the chain, the outerlink has never had a pin in it before. There's wear created on outerlinks when you insert and remove a pin as you probably guessed by how much force you need with a chain tool to insert and remove a ...


1

100% sure this was made by Motobecane. It looks exactly like my 1974 M. Grand Touring -- the frame, fork, headset, and bottom bracket are identical; even the frame color is the same. And the pedals are the same, too. Search for Motobecane Grand Touring on ebay for photos (I don't have mine any more). If I looked only at the second photo (except for the ...


2

If the car legitimately overtakes you and sometime afterwards hangs a right, leaving you reasonable braking distance, then you slow down. Simple. The car should not overtake you and immediately hang a right, cutting you up. That would be as bad a move against a cyclist as against another driver. If the result of that is you damaging their paintwork, they ...


23

As you're in Ontario the following references are official. Look at the picture at the bottom right of Toronto's Understanding Bicycle Lanes -- here's an excerpt: In summary, stop behind or pass to the left of the turning car. I generally expect drivers to see what's happening out the front of the cars, but never expect them to know what's happening to ...


4

My advice is, first and foremost, avoid hitting the car. Argue about who had right of way later. Irrespective of whatever the law says in your country, the collision will be decidedly more unpleasant for the cyclist that the driver. In Holland, if a driver hits a cyclist whilst turning right, the driver is liable; end of discussion. However, the law varies ...


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The key point here is that 90% of drivers immediately forget about any vehicle they've passed, unless it has bright flashing lights. The diagram you have added shows that you're behind, and in the driver's blind spot. Attempting pass on the inside is now to attempt suicide. The only time it's reasonably safe to pass on the inside is when the traffic is ...


22

Once the other car is in front of you generally the law and the legal system both suggest you need to give way to the car. In some places motorists technically need to give way to cyclists in the same lane or a bike lane, but that's something that the court will decide after the fact. It's IMO rude for a motorist to overtake you then turn, but it's going to ...


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Continue to ride predictably - so keep your pace and continue straight (unless you are turning right as well on to that side road, in which you should signal as such, and execute your right turn). Your question has much more to do with what the driver will do than you - therefore if you continue on your course, you are riding predictably, and they can ...


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I bought a Malvern Star Oppy S1. I have a similar age as you, similar intentions and wants, but only weigh 74 kgs. I have just completed an 2300 km ride into western and central Qld, and I can't fault this chromoly steel touring bike. The price was very good, excellent warranty and great service from the dealer and the parent company, if you are going to ...


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You are concerned that something is wrong with the frame. You can check the alignment by getting the Park FAG-2 alignment tool or, and it comes to the same thing, measuring to see if the distance to the seat tube is the same on both sides using a string - a string test. If you feel uncomfortable running a string from the rear dropouts around the head tube ...


3

The graphics looks similar to a '61 Dynamax TDF edition, made by Motobecane for the Canadian market. Could be a different model year maybe? 61 dynamax decals.. Look like a similar cartoon style. Either way its pretty awesome!


0

1970's wanna-be-a-racer French bike. That looks like Huret's cheapest rear derailleur. To ride it, you'd want to replace the headset and fork. Why fix up a cheap bike? If you're really considering it, at least remove the cotters and open up the French threaded bottom bracket to see if the cups are pitted. Spindle also. If they're not smooth - if there'...


2

It's not uncommon. Some Shimano shifters are prone to breaking off near the head in the shifter and it can be a bugger to get that little bit out of the shifter. My wife has Ultegra 9sp and I have to replace her cable about every 12-18 months. She can now tell when it's beginning to fray because the shifting gets dodgy before it completely breaks.


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It's unusual to have to replace cables every year, you'd expect several years of lifetime under any normal circumstances, even without maintenance. So it could be that you got a duff cable, or it could be that the bike is left in a particularly harsh environment, or it could just be that your memory is playing tricks. But whatever the reason, brake cables ...


1

Answer: Its a 1970s french racing bike in steel. I see cottered cranks (the wee bolts holding the cranks to the bottom bracket axle. so its pre 1980s Lugged steel construction - there's an edge above your head badge sticker Significant amounts of rake on the front fork (looks quite "bent") Quill Stem No rack or mudguard eyelets. Observations: the ...


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If you have a Fuji, and its got a double chainring, you have what is called a loose ball bottom bracket that is square taper. Yes the ball bearings are caged in a little cage, but it is loose ball. All Japanese bicycles from the 80s have these horrible bottom brackets except the very top of the line, because most of them used the funky external nut ...


3

This is Bicycles.SE, we're more aimed at helping you overcome practical problems. Since its a nice looking bike, why not fix it? Please tell us more about the problem/damage, with photos of the broken parts.


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You're on the slippery slope of knock-on upgrades. Its cheaper to buy a new bike equipped with disks than it is to upgrade an existing bike to discs from rim brakes. Look for Kool Stop brake pads for your existing rim brakes, which are often salmon-coloured. They work really well, and aren't stupidly-expensive. Don't buy $2 brake blocks and expect ...


0

I can from recent experience tell you that if you ride on the road, slicks make a big and positive difference. Noise is reduced, speed is increased, handling is as good if not better. I feel safe and don't work as hard. I went with wide ones just a bit less than the knobblies I replaced. But from what I have read, thinner ones are better, which makes sense ...


11

You basically get what you pay for, so there isn't any secret formula. Trek is one of the largest manufacturers on the planet, and is probably as good as any other on the market. But have a look at, and test if possible, other bikes as well as Trek, because different models have different geometries, and another geometry might feel better to you. Size also ...


4

The photos I have seen on line indicate this bike lacks a frame mount for the rear brake caliper. The fork also lacks a mount. It will be most likely be cost prohibitive to attempt modifying the frame. You would need road specific disc calipers if you will be using drop bars, a disc wheelset, rotors, and cables as the old ones will likely be too short. If ...


0

CO2 Cannister - beats a pump any day for getting up and rolling again quickly. But always carry a pump for backup. Invest in clothing. There's an increasing trend to Rain / Wind jerseys rather than full-on rain jackets. My favourites are the SS Castelli Gabba and the SS Sportful Fiandre. Gilet, arm-warmers, knee and leg warmers. Versatile kit as part of a ...


1

Lots of good advice so far, here are my tips. Glasses - I'm lucky enough to live somewhere with a lot of sunlight, so sunglasses are essential. But, even if you don't need sun protection, clear or yellow glasses will protect your eyes from bugs, grit and other foreign objects. (Try stopping safely when you've been blinded by something coming off the road ...


6

For the UK there are traffic statistics available. This graph from the 2015 Road Traffic Estimates shows the general trend for cars. There are detailed tables of traffic flow available. There is also geographical data available in the form an interactive map. This isn't broken down by time of day, but should give you an indication of which roads ...


3

It's subjective whether it's advisable for you. I do it, but you have to think about the following things: How often? Don't jump in to trying it every day to begin with Route. To begin with, allow plenty of time for getting lost and exploring different routes. It took me at least six months to settle on a route. Luggage. I have a small seatpost rack that ...


4

This is really only a question you can answer for yourself. How fit are you? How much do you ride currently, is 11 miles a long way for you? Are you comfortable in London traffic? Is it raining? These questions, and others, you will need to answer before you get close to an answer. Personally, I'd do it, I chose 2 points on the map in London at random and ...


6

There's a short answer to your question and a longer fuller answer. The short answer is that a common standard for road cranksets is 130mm BCD (bolt circle diameter). The smallest inner chainring you can use with 130 BCD is a 39 (as Kibbee has said, technically you can get a 38 tooth 130 BCD chainring although that doesn't leave much metal between the lower ...


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Firstly you need to confirm the material of your wheel. If your wheels are carbon fiber, you need to use the professional brake pads made of cork which are normally labelled as "use for carbon rims". If your wheels are aluiminium/alloy or steel, use pads made of rubber. Secondly you need to confirm the brake type of your wheels. The mountings for V brake ...


1

I used to transport my bikes inside a car a bit smaller tha a SUV. Although they where mountain bikes rather than road bikes. I used to tip down the rear seats and lay the bike horizontally. The car was just big enough to allow a full suspension 26" bike. When putting two bikes I removed the front wheel and separated the bikes with a car tire inner tube, ...


0

it looks to me like the cage part of the pedal is pressed together you may be able to remove the pedal and pound the end of the cage part back into the frame of the pedal thee type of connections are held together by distortion of the metal ie widening of the end of the piece to be held by widening by pressure like a rivet so possibly u could re hammer them ...


2

In all honesty 56cm sounds like a small frame size for someone who is 6' 1'' for some context I am 5' 8'' and generally find 56cm to be my preferred fit. All else being equal a 58 cm will likely give you more fitting options, as the frame stack will be taller. Most newer riders eventually complain of not being able to get the bars high enough, few complain ...


2

Assuming you are fitted correctly over the pedals on both bikes - the only other variable to consider is how far you have to reach to the bar. This is measured either as effective top-tube (ETT) or horizontal top-tube (HTT) length. There is another measurement given as reach - this the ETT from the intersect vertically over the bottom bracket. All will give ...


5

If your bike has disk brakes and you remove the wheels, insert a spacer between the brake pads for transportation. Without a spacer, accidentally pulling the brake lever when the wheels are off will push the brake pads to together and the brake disc won't fit. It can be cumbersome to separate the brake pads. There are special spacers available, but any ...


2

That carrier is lighweight and puts all the load on your seatpost. I'd be surprised if its rated for 10 kilos, probably as low as 5 kilos. You want to carry stuff on the bike, not on your back so that means a decent carrier/rack that has strong struts down to the rear axle mounts. That plus panniers may be all you need, but it may make the bike rear-heavy....


3

You need to be very careful with the weight limit on that rack, it will flop about if overloaded a little, or break if overloaded too much. But you're riding short distances in heavily populated areas, so presumably you're staying in buildings and buying prepared food, so you don't need to carry much. If you can afford to spend a little extra money on buses ...


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There is no real problems other than things getting scratched or broken being shuffled around, derailleurs easily get caught on seat belts etc. There is however a very easy and affordable option to avoid this. (Assuming you have QR skewers) Install a 2x4 or similar piece of wood. Then mount QR truck mounts to said 2x4. If you are going to be using your SUV ...


6

Not really, just be careful. For example, you don't want the derailleur to hit the door or something when getting it in or out. You also don't really want to stack things on top of the bike, especially if you have no wheel in (e.g. at the fork). That being said, getting a bike in and out of a vehicle can be inconvenient, plus, it can get your car dirty. ...


5

In the US, you generally expect bicycles to get cheaper towards October/November, rather than May/June/July. Everyone wants to buy a bicycle when Spring gets nice and Summer. Then, they'll ride a few days in the fall and put the bike away in winter. So, sales tend to decline in the Fall/Winter (and the deals come out), so looking in Fall is probably the ...


3

In most circumstances you should not be getting dropped by riders your weight and power. The advantage of drafting another cyclist is way beyond the differences in aerodynamics of your frame or brakes, even your position on the bike. If you have this problem in a sidewind it might be your position on the crossbike is too upright. It would seem your problem ...


0

I learned in physics class that solid wheels have a lower moment of inertia because the center of mass of the material is located closer to the hub (think of a skater holder her arms in and spinning). Technically, this should make the wheel easier to accelerate and lower the resistance of spinning the wheel. The do weigh more, so is this of any advantage ...


3

Additional points not mentioned in the existing answers: Cleanliness It should be shop-clean with little road grime, and shiny chrome. However if its been hanging in a shed for a few years it will have dull chrome and a light coating of dust. The dust of storage sits on "top" compared to dirt from riding which is up underneath. Seller may have washed ...


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Frame problems cannot be replaced. Everything else can be cheaply done. The cassettes can be replaced, so can bearings in the head set and bottom bracket. A broken bearing in the bottom bracket can cause major damage to a frame so that no future bearings will work. Turn the pedals with some weight, if there's any clicking, it's cause for worry. If a ...



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