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1

"Standard" brakes is not a thing. Can you be more specific? You imply you want to replace the brake levers with a different style, such as those designed for flat bars, but you provide a photo of road calliper brakes as your replacement. Are we talking about the brake callipers or the levers? As Batman points out, there are issues (though not ...


1

There is a map maintained by a Bike Radar person https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF&msa=0&msid=113029186218946556099.0004785d476236cd4866c&dg=feature


3

There are interrupter levers such as the Tektro RL720 pictured here (courtesy of Rivendel): You will need to redo the cabling, but standard V-brake levers will not work for a variety of reasons (handle bar diameter (conceivably, you could shim it on, but this doesn't seem very safe) and amount of cable pull (which you could solve with a travel agent, but ...


2

In all seriousness the only places I can think of where I've seen cobbles would be town centres. If you do a search on Google Images there are some stories dated 2013 which have images of the cobbled Market Place in Beverley - ironically the story there is that the council wanted to tear them up for health and safety reasons. I'm pretty sure I once rode ...


0

Like 7thGalaxy stated, a path like that should not prove to be an obstacle for most any bike. I recently started cycling again for commuting reasons and went the cyclocross route by purchasing a Raleigh Roper. The Roper is running a 700c tire with a very slight knobby on the edge in case I need to leave the hard-pack for any reason. Also, I love the drops as ...


2

Those paving stones look fine - you could take just about any bike along them. it's worth considering that there are bike races on far worse pavements - the Paris Roubaix famously. So you don't need to worry about that. I would say that the bike you linked to in Decathlon is also a hybrid - it's not a 'road bike' in the traditional sense, which would ...


0

I have a 29er cube mountain bike and put light weight mavic crossmax wheels with slick continental sports contact tires and changed the forks for rigid carbon forks and it made a massive diference, kept the disc brakes and gears set is shimano XT, I just dont like road bikes and i can ride this bike fast, you should see the look on road bike riders faces ...


0

On a cyclocross/hybrid commuter I'm running Continental Contacts, and they have been decent to good. (running 700x28's) https://www.conti-online.com/www/bicycle_de_en/themes/city/Allround/CONTACT_en.html Because of the wear I'm thinking of switching to Top Contact II's. Pretty spendy tho. Disclaimer I have a 'trekking' bike tire bias, In general I'm not ...


1

Potholes cause impact punctures (also called pinch punctures or snakebites) when the force of an impact is sufficient to compress the tyre all the way to the rim. Options to reduce the risk: Increase tyre pressure Reduce impact energy by reducing weight or reducing speed Use larger tyres, which would increase the distance between the rims and potential ...


1

I went to take pictures of the BB installation as @Batman suggested. After removing the crank arm, I actually noticed an offset of 1-2 mm on the drive side, like @mattnz anticipated. However, I also noticed that there was a gap of about 1 mm between the frame and the BB lid: After this observation I googled a little bit, and learned from this forum thread ...


0

From my own personal experience on a paved road, I found that I am generally a lot faster on my road bike when the tires are inflated to maximum pressure. I found that a lower inflated rear tire slows be down by as much as 11 minutes on a 15 mile ride. But I must add, that I was riding with a tailwind on my way back with the inflated tire. Nonetheless this ...


1

The bicycle blue book does not include a Gudereit, which is a German brand. It seems to miss information about a lot of European brands and models yet. Sometimes a sticker on the frame indicates the build quality. There is a sticker just below the saddle and on diagonal tube almost entirely at the front if I see it correctly. If one of those says something ...


0

Based on the review, it simply sounds like the cross-section of the bar is different than a usual bar. So, if you want to attach tri-bars to the bike, you may need to get a new drop bar (which has the usual circular cross-section), and then attach the tri bars to that bar. Of course, if the bike works well with the new drop bar and tri bars are all highly ...


3

A reasonable estimate can be found using a site like Bicycle Blue Book. This site is a database of used bike sale transactions going back for almost a decade, and has a number of pretty obscure manufacturers listed. You can even add upgrades you have made from the stock and get an estimate of how that changes the value, though it doesn't account for things ...


1

This started as a comment but I must be in a wordy mood this morning - here's a suggestion and a few things to consider. First though, when it comes to brand, any of the "proper" brands would do, it depends what you're comfortable on. For multi-purpose use I recommend a hybrid with flat bars - but add ergo grips and/or bar ends. Hybrids generally have rack ...


0

The simplest change you can make is to swap your big front ring for a smaller one. If you currently have 34/50 on the front, change it to 34/44. Your easiest gear on the big ring would go from 47 gear inches down to 42 (and the hardest from 110 to 97). If your front shifter is indexed it might not shift as quickly, but it should be OK because it will be a ...


9

As other answers and comments have indicated, you can successfully ride a road bike on loose gravel. There are five main factors, and they are all interconnected: The depth of the gravel. The key to riding in gravel is smooth lines. Avoid sharp turns: the deeper the gravel, the more your front wheel digs in and accentuates any steering movement you make. ...


2

You are asking two questions, one about the bike and one about the tires. Road bikes can easily go on gravel, or even off road. However, the ride quality and handling will be compromised the more "off road" you go. As far as the tires, the more you have "road" tires, the more flats you will have. This is due to the thin nature of road tires for less rolling ...


10

Google 'cyclocross'. The primary difference between a road bike and a CX bike is the size of the tires. You can ride your road bike anywhere your skills will allow. There are some gotcha's though. Skinny tires only have so much traction. Gravel flats won't be an issue for all but the lightest of race tires, but pinch flats from hitting larger rocks at ...


3

Any half decent touring or racing bike can do the speeds you noted, however, a more practical value for commuting is ~10-20 mph, on flat terrain. I'd recommend a touring bike for the purpose, rather than a racing bike for all the reasons noted previously. They have slightly wider tires and sturdier frames. The first leads to a somewhat less bumpy ride, the ...


6

I want to use the bicycle for the 26-30mi commute that I do everyday and if it is a racing bike it could potentially save time A trained cyclist can definitely ride farther and faster on a road bike than on a hybrid bike, based solely on wind resistance and bicycle fit. However, the speeds you list are completely unrealistic. Bike speeds are based ...


3

Usually, when you want to commute somewhere, you have to carry things (a rack+panniers are good for this, esp. if you carry laptops), you don't want to arrive in a pool of sweat (and you need a change of clothes on hand anyway) and you want to arrive comfortably (cause you should be productive at work). These are all the opposite of what a racing bike is ...


6

Guy Martin is obviously a decent cyclist, but you should note that his record-breaking ride occurred under very special conditions. For starters, he built his own frame (or rather Jason Rourke built it for him). Next, he chose exactly where the run would take place - on sand flats. And not least he was towed in order to get up towards top speed, which ...


1

For the first question answer is «Not». The problem is air resistance, starting from 40-45 km/h it's like a wall. For every addition to you speed you'll spend more and more power. For the second — 50 km/h (and even more) is a normal speed for descents on a road bike. This bikes is pretty controllable on such speed.



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