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4

Search some more for secondhand bikes. EUR 300,- should get you a nice enough used bike from a couple of years back. A tip I was given when searching for my first bike was to search the bike or racing bike category on ebay and similar sites for "ultegra" or the name of some other sufficiently high-end rather than the brand. This filters out a lot of bad ...


1

I solved the puzzle. It's a Caloi Triathlon. Although Caloi is a brazillian brand, they ordered 200 bikes from Suntour in 1985 for their racing teams. It came originalli with suntour shifting group, sugino cranks and nitto handlebars. It's such a rare ride over here, it's a shame the paint is no longer original and i have no access to a full range of the ...


0

I think I used to own the same frame. It's (if it's similar to my frame) a Mitsubishi Shogun type frame, although most pictures are not showing with the lugs and same head-tube. Please bear in mind that frames vary between years, not just models. This is not my bike, but it's the same frame: ...


1

The photo quality could be better, but it looks to me like it is a mid-range Japanese-made frame from the mid- to late-1980s. The rear dropouts are not stamped, so it's not a low-end frame, and the single shifter boss on the downtube is for unitized Shimano or Suntour shifters, like you can see on the bikes photographed in this thread. It's hard to tell for ...


2

Really hard to tell from the pictures. One thing I am certain of is that almost none of it is stock. A few observations: The main frame is lugged, has full length brake cable housing and horizontal dropouts and starred bottle braze-ons. All of those date it to sometime prior to the late 80s. Split brake cable housing on road bikes became the norm on ...


2

Following the advice of those who commented: I came upon this solution. Cut the access length (about 1 cm), leaving enough for adjustment Melt the ends of the straps with a torch Use electrical tape to wrap the ends tightly so they resemble 'method 1' but without the excess length.


2

Don't neglect your core and upper body. If your core is weak, your ability to balance, lift, and jump the bike will also be weak.


4

Ride off-road. Riding a road bike on dirt is a great way to improve your skills. Get out on dirt roads or mild MTB trails (just be mindful that large rocks or tree roots can cause a flat or even a dented rim if you're not careful) Bonus points: you get some great looks when you pass people on full suspension MTBs! ;)


0

Your cheapest option is to mount the 8 speed cassette on the new wheels. This will require a spacer but it'll get you up and running with minimal fuss and risk. If you want to upgrade your bike to support the 10 speed cassette then you will need: 10 speed shifters ...you could replace only the rear shifter, but they're usually sold as a pair and you ...


8

Off the bike many forms of exercise will help. Yoga and martial arts in particular will help with balance. On the bike consider mountain biking to help your road technique. A mountain bike with no shocks even better. Once you learn to negotiate rocks, roots, and drop offs then a lot of the low speed stuff that happens on the street seems easy. ...


3

I'm far from an expert here, but here are somethings that have helped me: Pay attention to how you feel on the bike and how the bike responds to you. Some of this you are probably doing naturally – like shifting your weight back as you brake. Read about cycling technique. Encourage yourself to think about and experiment with the dynamics of the bike – for ...


14

In rapidly descending order of importance ... Practice track stands. See How to do a track stand? This teaches balance and slow bike handling skills. Also practice riding in confined spaces (the last time I fell off was trying to do a U turn on a path that was 4 ft (1.2m) wide :-) Learn to jump both wheels off the ground at the same time. This is usually ...


2

One thing that can help is training on rollers. It's kind of dangerous at the begining, because the bike reacts a lot to little imbalances, but as you get more experience on them you will feel much more stable on the bike and this might help in feeling the bike better on the road. As for bike handling, ride it and ride it more, I don't think anything beats ...


1

So, I'm thinking that this is a bike that was originally setup with an 8-speed drive train. At some point the previous owner replaced the rear wheel with one built around a 10-speed hub. If I'm reading Sheldon Brown's page on hub and cluster compatibility correctly you should be able to mount an 8-speed cassette on a 10-speed free hub body. So it seems like ...


1

Very generally speaking, the number of cogs on the cassette needs to match the number of clicks in the shifter. If your shifter clicks through 9 gears then you need a 9 speed cassette. If it has 8 clicks as yours does then you need an 8 speed cassette. If you want to switch to 10 speeds then at a bare minimum you'd need new 10 speed shifters and quite likely ...


-2

You will probably need to get a ten speed derraileur. Otherwise you might be able to get by with friction shifters if you've already got a thinner chain. This isn't the brightest idea because it's basically the same thing as driving a manual and requires some cursory knowledge of how the shifting mechanism works.


2

YOU SHOULD HAVE CHECKED BEFORE BUYING THE WHEELS! 10-speed Dura-Ace is not compatible with other cassettes. You can install a 8 speed cassette on other Shimano 10-speed compatible hubs. Edit: Reading the question again, of course you can keep the 10 speed cassette. Just replace the shifters, rear derailleur and chain with 10-speed ones and be prepared to ...


2

The trend towards compact frames goes back to the early 90s and an Englishmen named Mike Burrows. Burrows helped design several time trial frames which featured a radically lowered (but not sloping) top tube and a very long seat post. During this time most time trial bikes had top tubes that sloped from the seat DOWN to the head tube (the opposite of what ...


1

I once noticed something similar to this when climbing up a hill. The "grinding" sound was coming from a couple loose spokes. For a complete diagnosis you will need to provide more information and I can update my answer from there. First step, check the tensions of your spokes. Are there any obviously loose spokes? Tighten any loose spokes you might find. ...


1

I terms of the "am I too heavy for my tires?" question, you can look for the specs on the tire maker's site. Schwalbe publishes a rated load for their tires, I'd expect that other reputable makers do as well. As a point of reference their Marathon Plus tire is rated for a load of up to 90 kg / 198 pounds in a 32-622 size (probably at 6.55 bar / 95 psi). ...


0

As someone who commutes with a CX bike and loves it, that bike shop employee is completely full of it. If he's seriously suggesting that you're going to corner better with a road bike in bad conditions than a CX bike he's a complete tool. What kind of tire you're using is the obvious consideration, not road vs. CX. Given that you can run wider tires with a ...


2

Practically speaking? Assuming that the "virtual geometries of the bikes is similar (in other words if you measured the bikes as if there was a horizontal top tube), the big differences will have to do with fit. You have three choices: A standard frame with a horizontal top tube. A frame where the top tube hits that head tube at the same place a ...


-1

Sloped top tubes allow suspension seat posts


1

(I've never owned a cannondale bike) judging from the parts : a triple crankset bar end shifters cantilever brakes the rims seem wider than typical road bike rims. a long cage dérailleur to accommodate big cassette (Not sure since the pic isn't the drive side) It's likely a touring bike, so it's probably a modified Cannondale SR300, or Touring 1


0

It should be fully closed. The lever is only intended to be opened to allow the tire to pass during a wheel change or if you hit a pothole and knock your wheel badly out of true. If your pads are too close to the rim you make an adjustment with the barrel adjuster. Riding with the quick release open compromises the braking power of the caliper. You may not ...


2

Apart from these being very different frames with very different uses you won't have much luck transferring parts. In terms of your bike there is very little that would fit: Wheels - won't fit - the demo 8 has a 650b wheel (27.5") the sirrus has a 700c wheel (29") and a thru axle vs quick release hub. (incidentally both are 135mm rear hubs though) Fork/ ...


3

Adding rear suspension to an existing bike not designed for rear suspension is hard - you'd have to cut the tubes, weld them and make sure the result is safe. Adding front suspension to a bike is not so hard, but it will change the geometry. You need to find the specs of the fork and headset that are in the bike already, and then find something compatible ...


3

The crash made the chain drop from the currently selected front chainring to a smaller one (i.e if you have 3 rings and you where on the middle, it jumped on the 1st - lefmost- smaller one). The crash didn't change any gear on the shifter though, it just made the chain pop to a smaller ring. Maybe not fully, but partially. Afterwards cranking a couple of ...


0

If you don't have good measuring tools (and know how to use them, but that's not too hard) it will be very hard to tell the difference between 25.4 mm and 26 mm – until you try to fit the bars in, then it will be obvious… For a bike of that vintage odds are good (according to my recollection and Sheldon Brown's Crib Sheet) that the size is 25.4 mm. So what ...


0

The bike should be comfortable and make you smile when you ride it. Do some reading about bicycle fit (I highly recommend Grant Peterson's book Just Ride for a nice readable introduction to fitting a bicycle and all sorts of other information). Then buy a used bike that fits your needs as best you understand them – and that seems to fit. You'll be lucky if ...


0

The braking loads are unlikely to be enough to exceed the tensile strength of a 6 mm bolt – forgive my butchering of units here, but it would take something like 2,250 pounds of force to make a 6 mm bolt fail (75,000 psi tensile strength for type 18-8 or 316 stainless and about 0.03 square inches in the bolt works out to around 2,250 pounds of force). That's ...


0

You might find the Geometry of Bike Handling on Calfee Design's site helpful. There are some good articles by Grant Petersen on bike making at the Rivendell site that cover some aspects of geometry and bike design. He also has a good section on geometry in his book Just Ride. Once upon a time there was a nice series of articles on the Rivendell site where ...


0

No -- You've got several problems here. 10 speed mountain Shimano has different cable pull than 10 speed road Shimano (which is the same cable pull as 9 speed mountain Shimano, I believe, so if you double check this, you can drop a 9 speed Deore in). Then, you have the mountain vs road FD, which if you're using brifters, you need to use a road FD. Front ...


0

Bike shops from one area to the next can be as different as oranges and orangutans. The same can be true of bike shops within a given area. Here in the "Olympia Washington Metroplex", there are seven bike shops: Deschutes (on Custer), Deschutes (on 4th), Joy Ride, Old Town, Bike Tech, Falcones, REI There are a couple of different bike collectives: ...


2

Here in the Toronto area, you can find these bikes either at a spring bike show or (more commonly) fall bike show. They are generally priced aggressively to clear out stock and you won't find many in the stores in the coming years. Most shops will not have previous model years around as they make money selling bikes and want to move stock. I also managed ...


2

Official record? No. It's simply not something the UCI has tracked nor has there really been an accurate way to track this. This is the first year where the entire peloton will have their data tracked during the Tour. Cycling isn't like Formula 1 where nearly every datapoint is meticulously tracked. The upside of the UCI weight limit on bikes is that most ...


1

Question is why coast? Personally I made an aim not to coast too much when riding( checked with a cadence histogram chart, usually is around 2~3% of time ). This is possible even after doing all out 30second intervals, I am still able to push out enough power to move me forward at a decent speed. The benefit of not coasting is obvious, your body will adapt ...


3

The highest speeds on bike similar to road bikes is the 200m track sprint, where the record is 9.347 seconds, for an average of 77kph.


10

Not a complete answer really, but I've had a scan through this TdF data Twitter account and Greipel's winning speeds from his two wins this year are an average of 59.58 km/h over the last km and a peak speed of 67.03 km/h. Pretty quick.


0

There is a certain degree of compatibility, but usually it comes with a big compromise, such as having to use a flat handlebar (for your MTB shifters and brakes), smaller diameter wheels (road is 28", your MTB is likely 26"), lower gearing (pedaling on road is easier so gears are higher) or bigger than usual tires (because of your wide MTB rims). By the ...


3

What's the wheel size? If it's 700c, then you can get disc road/CX/gravel frame. Do mind type of bottom bracket, hub widths and seatpost diameter, though. You can fit MTB shifters and brake levers to a drop bar, but that would look funky, so probably flat bar only. For proper fit, stem might require replacement too.


6

They are GPS trackers with a wireless data connection, GSM or EDGE would be enough for the data rate, but it might be something faster. The company supplying them is Dimension Data you can sign up for a free data report at the end of each stage here.


2

Its almost always more cost effective to sell the existing bike and use the funds to buy a (used) bike you want. Its worth doing it from the perspective of learning about bikes, owning a unique piece of art/engineering "franken bike" or just a cool way to kill some spare time. Doing it because you want a road bike and only have a MTB is the wrong reason. ...


9

This is a special device that gathers the following data, according to this article: the stage winner’s top speed, average speed and time per kilometer the fastest riders up key climbs the speed of the winner at the finish line the top speed achieved by a rider on the day average speed across all riders


0

Bottecchia are an Italian brand who sell everything from BMX bikes to professional racing bikes. Here in the US the brand is probably best known for being ridden by Greg LeMond in his historic 1989 Tour de France win. It's hard to say the exact model of this bike. It's a low end model from the 1970s "bike boom". The crankset appears to be a Nervar cottered ...


2

Bang for buck would suggest an aluminum rack, but these typically don't support high loads. Once you start heading into the 20-30+ kg range steel performs better in terms of total load capacity and behavior under load (I.e., less flex which reduces the chance of a shimmy). In terms of steel I have had good luck with Tubus and hear good things about Surly ...


1

You'd need to replace the hub (i.e. build the wheel with a new hub -- typically, its better to just get a new wheel), and then respace the frame (i.e. coldset) to take the new hub. It's easy still to find freewheels, so I'd recommend you just replace the freewheel.


2

Well, you don't have to… That said, Tektro makes some very nice and inexpensive levers – both drop bar levers (RL340) and interrupter levers (RL720) which are much more effective than suicide levers. At the very least, I would take off the suicide levers, I've never had good luck with them. The problem that I had with suicide levers was that they had so much ...


1

Tsunoda are/were a mass manufacturer in Japan somewhat similar to Schwinn in the USA. Most of the bikes they produced were low end though they did make some mid-to-upper end models (I once had a Tsunoda made Lotus branded frame from the early 80s). I believe the brand is still around in the Japanese market but now mostly making folding bikes. Your bike ...


4

To me, gravel bikes seem mostly like cross bikes with a bit more money they can take from your wallet. 1) Road and mountain shifters and derailleurs don't play nice with each other at 11 speed, so this question is moot. If you want to check a particular crankset on the bike, look at the width and the type of BB setup. I don't see why you'd want to switch ...



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