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17

Before you take any more forceful measures, it may be a good idea to think a little about chemistry: 'Rust' is typically the name put on any type of corrosion, but technically & specifically, it is the corrosion of iron (or steel) to form iron-oxides. Although your bicycle is most definitely steel, your seatpost is not -- it's aluminum-alloy, which ...


16

The best method for handling exterior frame rust depends on how much time you'd like to invest. The difference comes down to what you use to complete the two basic steps: Remove the rust Good: Sandpaper - Cheap, but wont remove all the rust, and may leave debris. Better: Steel Wool - Will remove most of the rust, but may leave steel wool fragments, which ...


10

Stainless steel is rust-resistant not rust-proof, especially if the bike sees the outdoors a lot, it isn't uncommon for screws to get a fine sprinkling of brown spots. The good thing about screws is that they can be easily replaced. If you were very enterprising you can probably replace all your screws with titanium ones, they are slightly stronger than ...


9

This is a tough one. It's not impossible but you really need mechanical advantage. If you can clamp the seatpost, you will get the best chance at freeing this. You will probably damage/lose the seatpost with this method. Make sure the seatpost is free of grease and oil on the outside. Turn the frame upside down and clamp the seatpost into a bench ...


9

The effects of rust are typically overstated. Where is you concern? Remove rust (or replace the parts) on moving components such as chains and cables, they will run smoother, more efficiently and quieter. On non-moving surfaces such as frame and handle bars etc, forget about it. Under normal use high quality steel gets nothing more than cosmetic rusting, ...


8

If you're getting knee-deep floods it's destroying the bearings along with the chain. You need to hang the bike up somehow.


8

This is obviously (from the images) a suspension fork, and a very low-end one. Suspension forks are heavier than their rigid counterparts, but the trade-off is that they absorb shocks. These rust spots MUST MEAN the fork has long ago COMPLETELY LOST its ability to work properly as a suspension. As a result, you are carrying useless extra-weight, are not ...


8

Greasing your seatpost will prevent problems like this: "Removing Seat Post rusted into downtube". Don't use chain oil, grease is what you want. As whatsisname pointed out, all fasteners on your bike should be lightly greased. This is what keeps them from corroding and seizing over time, becoming a real pain to remove. If you have trouble with a ...


7

You should absolutely grease your seatpost (unless it is carbon fiber). It won't slip around if your seatpost clamp is properly tightened. Get a thing of grease from the bike shop, like the park tool grease. Better yet, get the big tub. Then, generously apply it all over inside your seattube. When you think you have enough, add some more. Then put the ...


7

Throw that thing out and get a rigid fork. You don't need suspension unless you're riding off-road, or jumping over cars, or whatever it is the kids do these days. And bad suspension is worse than no suspension. Rigid forks are pretty durable, so you may be able to find up a used one. Make sure that the crown-to-axle distance is similar to what you have ...


7

Chain will rust always after washing (or even light rain or a puddle of water), if not re-lubed. I think this is detrimental to the chain, as it removes material from the rollers and thus contributes to chain stretch. Bolts for stem, handlebars etc. seem to always like to rust after rain or washing. I don't think it is a big deal, but it ruins the look of ...


6

After cleaning I give the bolts a small squirt of WD40 followed by a good rub down. This leaves a very fine film of oil that won't hold dirt but is just enough to stave off the rust if done regularly. The spray also displaces (WD, water displacement, geddit?) any water left from cleaning in any little gaps.


6

Where possible, replace with stainless fasteners. Things like water bottle bracket bolts are readily available in stainless at a good hardware store. But most fasteners on a good quality bike are stainless to begin with, so it may be that you're not seeing "rust" per se but rather a sort of corrosion that can form on stainless.


6

When I was doing bike rehab for Christmas Anonymous I saw many bikes like this. It can be good or it can be bad, depending on how much weather it's seen. First thing is to do the obvious -- wash it (we used a power washer), clean & oil the chain, clean and oil the derailers. If it's been in the weather enough then the cables will rusted solid and will ...


6

Don't pressure hose your bike at all and steer clear of the air compressor. You don't want to force water, air or grit into seals and bearings. I always lightly hose off excess dirt or brush it off, then sponge down with a soapy hot water, then rinse, leave or drip -dry or use a cloth to wipe off excess liquid. Clean the chain, rings, cassette, rims with ...


5

Heavy, water-proof grease is a good idea. Slipperiness isn't the reason for the grease. The goal here is to keep out moisture and oxygen, thereby discouraging oxidation. Aluminum oxide is especially problematic, as its molecules are substantially larger than the aluminum molecules in your seat post. Oxidation will cause it to jam very tightly. In general, ...


5

It is possible for water or sweat to enter the frame, and for corrosion to build up. Any rust would be most likely to happen on the steel bolt (which is missing) rather than on the aluminum frame, but oxidization comes in many forms. While this is unlikely to cause you any significant issues, it's an easy fix. Any M4 threaded allen bolt, between 1.5 and ...


5

Chromoly can rust. Aluminum usually doesn't unless you're riding in the ocean. Cheapest fix is probably some automotive touch-up paint; sand / clean the area (scuff the surrounding paint up a little), apply a coat, wet sand, repeat. Won't be perfect but it'll protect the underlying metal from rusting. Of course, if you want that perfect "unblemished" look ...


5

You should check out the 15 Way To Unstick a Seatpost by Sheldon "Unggggghhh!" Brown http://www.sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html


5

You can probably use a small wire brush to get the rust out of the frame and for the future use JP Weigle Frame Saver spray. It acts as a rust inhibitor so should slow down/stop any rust forming on the inside of the frame. You can get frame saver at JensenUSA (I'm sure there are lots of other spots too). ...


5

Untested and at-your-own-risk, but this is what I would try: Soak the rusted join with WD-40 from above and below (ie. flip the frame and spray down the seat tube). Let it sit for a few hours or overnight. Secure the frame against something solid, like a heavy workbench (not a repair stand!). Put an old saddle you don't care much about on the seat post. ...


5

There's not much you can do against the evil trifecta of salt, water, and sand. You can use a teflon, graphite, or moly based dry lube but inevitably sand particles are going to gouge the metal and salt+water is going to start corrosion. The problem with chain wear due to sand is that the chains themselves can look good (i.e., not rusty on the outside), ...


5

I read Chris Cleeland's answer and was appalled that his was the accepted answer. Let me first state that I used to be a bike mechanic, and I ride through inclement weather year round. As another already stated, WD40 is useful for cleaning, but you should never use it on your drive-train (chain, freewheel, front cogs). You wrote that you are concerned ...


4

This is fairly normal. Many of the screws are are stainless but where you use the hex key on them they still rust. My best guess is that this is because you scuff the metal when you remove and put them back in. I'll also mention that this happens on whitewater kayaks. Again typically in the places where a screw driver has touched the screw/bolt. To my ...


4

No, it wouldn't work as long as the frame is not hermetically sealed to keep water from entering (I don't know why manufacturers don't do that). The silica gel can only absorb a tiny quantity of water, a drop or so per packet, then it becomes ineffective. It is only effective to absorb water vapor. You can bake it in the oven to regenerate it. If you want ...


4

You can get it from Niagra Cycle Works via Amazon.com. Not quite the great TO area but not too far either. http://www.amazon.com/T-9-Rust-Protectant-Ounce-Spray/dp/B001447PEK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1298302015&sr=8-1


4

While I agree with cherouvim that wet lube is a good thing for rust prevention, I would also ask if it's possible to store the bike higher up, perhaps with some kind of simple cover to prevent the rain and salt-spray from getting to it. Perhaps a couple of hooks on the wall and some rope or a simple bench or couple of large stones to stand the bike on. ...


4

Even though it's a "beater bike", I'm guessing you really want to keep it around for a while. If that's the case, I believe the best protection for it would be to paint it. Strip the frame down (take all the components off) and thoroughly wash it. If you want to do the job yourself, sand the frame down to remove any rust spots. If you have too much ...


4

You may be overwashing it. Rust needs water to oxidize steel and you're providing it in copious amounts. That combined with either the sulphur in the air or salt (if you're near an ocean) is a deadly mix. You may want to give your exposed bolts a nice coating of something that will prevent rust. WD-40 is fine for that purpose but washes off easily. Some ...


3

In addition to the visible rust on the stanchion tube (that's what those are called), the rust has most likely damaged the gaskets sealing off the lower tubes - the portion of the fork that the stanchion tubes slide into. Even if you got the rust off and got the stanchion tubes in a good-as-new condition (which is probably impossible) you'd still have to ...



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