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5

It looks like a cheap enough derailleur that replacing it shouldn't cost too much, and the rust is severe enough that if the derailleur has stopped shifting I'd replace it. If you can force the derailleur to move with your hand it's very likely to can repair it just by pouring sufficient oil on it and working it backwards and forwards for a while. But ...


4

While the aluminum frame itself will be relatively ok, the problem will be your bottom bracket (almost certainly made in part of steel) which was most probably sitting in a big puddle of water. Even if the water didn't cause the bearings to rust, a freezing/melting cycle can cause damage to the bearings themselves, force lubricants out, and otherwise mess-up ...


4

Technically rust is limited to iron. What is bad is the rust starts and continues. The water / oxidizing agent is not consumed. Aluminum will oxidize but it forms a protective coating. An aluminum frame will not "oxidize out". Some iron alloys such as stainless steel prevent rust. I don't know why you don't seem to see stainless in bicycles.


3

Rusty sprockets aren't typically going to be an issue. As long as the teeth aren't too worn in, then the cogs themselves will be fine. However, if the cogset (likely a freewheel) itself is having difficulty rotating, it's likely the grease in the ratcheting mechanism has seized up, or the pawls are broken or faulty. The internals of the freewheel might ...


2

Your serial number description STATES that this is a "Murray of Ohio" manufactured bike. Serial number on bottom bracket means before 1965... the factory was removed from Ohio and located in Tenn. from ~1952 on. The 502 means Sears... check out late 1950s to 1960s catalogs for the 5 digit model number that's between MOD and the lower larger serial number. ...


2

I think the rust on the pad surfaces will go away on its own when you use the brakes. It's probably just a thin layer on the surface. I don't think it hurts the brake disks, since rusted metal is softer than the original metal before rusting. The rust on the backing material probably doesn't matter much either, since you were still able to remove the pads ...


2

I did a FD replacement last week and its not hard nor expensive. Mostly its fiddly getting all the gear positions to line up and not rub too badly. You have a band-on deraileur (it straps around the frame with a band) not a braze-on one (which bolts to a U shaped nubbin which is brazed or otherwise part of the frame. I can't tell if its top pull or bottom ...


2

Rust on the surfaces of the pads & disc could cause extra wear & noise, or if bad enough reduce the effectiveness of the brakes. If there is enough present that you can see residue on your finger after rubbing the surface, I would suggest cleaning with a stiff bristled brush or a kitchen scrubber & isopropyl alcohol (some people have recommended ...


1

Is the frame pure aluminium? Aluminium does not rust. If the frame is an alloy you would need to check whether or not the other materials are susceptible to rust.


1

If you clean the pads with some brake cleaner and a brush and they just look rusty, it's not necessarily a problem provided your brakes are grippy and effective. If clean them and replace any bent discs and your problems go away, you're probably safe as long as you keep a close eye on things. In other words, if your brakes are grippy, quiet, and smooth, a ...


1

Rust or other build-up on your pads is not an issue if you have enough surface left. Depending on the bran 1-2mm on either side is plenty. If your brakes aren't biting properly clean the pads and rotors with rubbing alcohol. Use an old toothbrush for the pads and a clean rag for the rotors.



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