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23

Padded seats tend to have more padding than used at any given time. This pushes the other 'extra' padding into the soft tissues. This causes numbness and discomfort over time. So slim hard seats are actually more comfortable over time, if they are the right size. You need to make sure your sit bones (ischial tuberosity) are well situated. The sit bones of ...


17

For a quick fit, the general goal is to keep the seat high enough that you can get a nearly-full leg extension, without 'locking' the knee. Over a long period of time, if you find that you are having knee, foot or hip pains, try making small adjustments with the saddle, about 0.5-1.0cm at a time, either up, down, forwards or backwards. If the pain gets ...


17

First, do you have cycling shorts w/ a chamois? If not, I would highly recommend them. As a note, they are your underwear (ex: do not wear undergarments and then put on the shorts). Second, how did you choose your saddle? Was it fitted through some type of measurement system ala bontragers inform system or specializeds BG system? How much did you spend on ...


17

Yes, people still use them and swear by them. I've seen them for sale in most of my local bike shops. The breaking-in thing (that they mold to your backside over time) is the big feature that everybody who uses one seems to love. They're very popular amongst the touring crowd, especially the B-17. Yesterday, I was volunteering at a huge road ride event and ...


16

Generally you will find, for getting started a gel seat may help. As do padded shorts. However, once you ride regularly, and build some muscle and tolerance around your sit bones, you will find it annoying. So it is a good gateway drug to getting used to a saddle. Generally people find that narrower and simpler seats are more comfortable, once you start ...


13

There are a number of ways to determine the seat height for a road bicycle. But you should also pay attention to how you feel while riding your bike at different heights. In addition, it is important to consider your entire position, not only the seat height. Finally, if you are riding a lot, change your seat height in small increments over time to avoid ...


13

Saddles can be very specific to the individual...but some general advice: Try to find a local bike shop that will let you test ride different saddles. Five minutes on a trainer is not enough, a good bike shop will let you take a saddle on a real ride. Talk with others that have similar biking style. A great mountain bike saddle does not always make a great ...


12

Wouldn't the simplest answer be to switch the saddles between the bikes? You'd probably end up using the less used bike more and the less broken in saddle more too.


12

The purpose of the channel in a bike saddle is to reduce pressure to the perineum, which can cause numbness and other long-term problems. This is a matter of both comfort and health, although not everyone is affected. Individual body type, saddle design, bike fit, and riding style work together to make saddle fit a very personal issue. On a related note, ...


11

The rule of thumb of "the highest possible without wobbling the hips down to reach for pedals" seems like a better rule than "having the barefoot heel just touch the pedal with the leg completely straight when the pedal is completely down". If your saddle is at the right height, it should be difficult to place a foot on the ground while seated. Now that ...


10

I've used a Brooks saddle in a similar climate (Vancouver, BC) without any major issues. Treat the topside with Proofide every 6-12 months and keep the underside dry (fenders, wedge bag, etc). Store the bike in a dry place between rides so that the leather can dry out naturally. A saddle cover would probably help but I've never used one.


10

Brooks recommends applying a layer of proofide to the bottom of the saddle. However, you should not wipe this layer off after it sets. Just leave it on, and it will protect the underside. Personally, I also recommend fenders for a bike that you plan to use frequently in the rain. This will also drastically reduce the amount of water that splashes up into ...


10

Copied this from a saddle mfg website: How to measure your own sit bones Of course the measure you really want is between the centres of your ischial tuberosities – the pointy lower parts of your pelvic bone on either side. Many bike dealers have a pad that you can sit on to measure this distance, but you can do it at home too. Take a piece of aluminium ...


10

There is a lot of variation across models of saddles even if you stay within one genre (eg only consider road or only consider MTB). However, you'll find if you look at popular racing saddles that MTB saddles tend to be shorter. This is because in singletrack you're very frequently moving onto and off-of the saddle. A longer saddle might interfere with the ...


10

As a leather saddle wears out, it tends to sink and become softer in the middle while splaying out around the edges. This, naturally, makes the saddle uncomfortable and uneven. Lacing a saddle is a way to revive it and return it to its natural shape, or at least something close. You should lace your saddle if you find that it has become too soft. And ...


9

get a good pair of padded bike shorts. I resisted for years, but after I got my first pair, it made a huge difference in comfort. You want the padding on your butt, not the saddle.


9

Choosing a saddle that fits you is very important. The wrong saddle can lead to numbness and pain in the crotch area, and in the long run serious health issues. The right saddle for you should fit comfortably regardless of what type of riding you do and will depend mainly on the width of your pelvic. Ideally you should get a professional fit. If one is not ...


9

The best kind of saddle for touring is one which you find comfortable. The cut-out is intended to relieve pressure from your soft bits leaving most of your weight on your sit-bones. A very wide saddle might start to rub excessively inside your thigh on a long ride, while one with springs may be too bouncy at higher cadences and waste some of your effort. ...


9

In my experience (week long camping / bike touring trips), I have never thought "Man, I wish I had a chair." I have often thought, "I have packed way too much stuff." There are a few things to consider. You have looked into weight and cost, but there is also space and time considerations. Volume: Do you have space on your rack to put this? How small does ...


8

Brooks saddles are on the way back in with the trendy fixie crowd. You can certainly see plenty of them on the streets of Sydney, and two of my friends have them on their bikes. Apparently they are pretty comfortable once broken in, just as you've said in your question.


8

The thing that causes saddle sores is friction. Moisture contributes as well. Cycling shorts are probably a good idea, but if you don't want to wear cycling shorts (I don't for commuting, but my longest commute is half the distance of yours), there's three key things: A properly fitting saddle. In particular, there's a lot of problems with people wanting ...


8

The best advice I heard on the topic is to sit comfortably on the bike while placing your heel on the pedal. Move the seat up until your leg is fully extended, and then tighten the seat. This way, the leg will be only slightly bent at full extension when the ball of the foot is on the pedal. You definitely don't want the leg to be fully extended while ...


8

Depending on how much you ride, you may want to consider having your bike professionally fit at a bike store. My wife received a free fit when we bought her Dolce at Peleton Cycles, but they told me they will fit anyone to their bike for about $70. It's pricey, but if you are riding your bike constantly, it may be worth the money. It took them about an ...


8

Yes, a more aggressive stance requires a narrower saddle. Your pelvic bone is a fairly complicated structure, but there's basically a triangle that you sit on with a saddle. There's two bumps ("ischial protrusions") at the back end that take your weight if you're sitting with your back straight up (such as on a chair or the saddle of a cruiser or dutch ...


8

The obvious answer would be to get some Cycling Jeans, i.e. jeans specifically designed for cycling in. These have reinforcement and stretch in the right places and often have other features such as deep pockets, a loop to carry a small lock and reflective strips. Levi, Rapha, Muxu and Swrve all make cycling jeans, so there's a fair amount of choice.


8

There is a lot of complete and utter non-sense around Brooks saddles. When it comes to saddles, everything works for somebody and nothing works for everybody. Rule #1. If it's not reasonably comfortable on Day 1, it will never be comfortable. Saddle comfort is about getting the right shape to match your backside, leather saddles like the Brooks will ...


7

The problem is that there is only one bolt holding the seat at the angle you want. Put enough torque on the back of the saddle and can overcome the friction that's holding the seat in place. A few options: Tighten up that bolt as much as you dare (but you've already tried that). Increase the friction between the seat post and the bottom of the seat clamp ...



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