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9

Almost all saddles will be exchangeable -- there are a few rare (and very expensive ones) you wouldn't encounter unless you were looking for them which can't be exchanged. So yes, almost surely if you buy a new saddle you can use it on another bike. Note that some saddles are marketed as "road" or "mtb" - the mtb ones are possibly more durable, but this ...


4

I've purchased a couple of used leather saddles. The ones that were barely used or just broken in were fine, but there was one well-used one that was the exception. Its sit bone area was visibly lower on one side than the other, enough that it was the likely cause of an SI joint dysfunction for me. I'd say if it looks relatively new and close to the ...


4

A couple of things to be aware of: Seatposts come in a bizarre array of diameters, so the odds of a seatpost from one bike fitting another is not great. There are maybe 3-4 different schemes for mating seats with seatposts. Most "real" bikes use the scheme where two "rails" under the seat are held by a clamp atop the post, but there are a few other ...


3

I believe popular advice for MTB carving is to drop the outside pedal, rather than keeping the pedals horizontal. If you then dump your weight to the outside pedal (off your bars) you can lower your center of gravity some and in the case of pumping that weight dump, increase your traction. While keeping your pedals horizontal for obstacles increases your ...


2

Checking the tension on a Brooks saddle is part of the regular maintainance. Any bolt that doesn't have sufficient tension on it will move due to random road vibration. From http://www.brooksengland.com/getting-in-touch/faqs/saddle_maintenance/ Q: Why have the Rails / Tension Pin / Backplate on my Brooks saddle broken? By far the most common cause ...


2

Q1: A bad idea because it is already broken-in in a way that means it is irreparably shapes for the previous owners body? It is possible to reshape a leather saddle by first soaking it in water, resetting the shape then breaking the saddle in. I have seen it referred to as the "Blocking Technique" and have also seen warnings that it is possible to ...


1

A technological solution is a Dropper Seat Post. But you should really learn to switch legs to match the turn. You generally want the outside leg down and weighted. http://www.leelikesbikes.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/P2PIcover.png


1

There was one time my Brooks with no waterproofing whatsoever got thoroughly soaked and it stretched and sagged like an arm chair with broken springs. I've also encountered similar used Brooks saddles that are so stretched that all you feel is the front and rear of the saddle and nothing in-between The only I've been able to make them work again is to ...


1

There is likely much more variability at the point where the seatpost and frame meet as compared to the point where the seatpost and seat meet. http://sheldonbrown.com/seatpost-sizes.html



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