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11

In my experience (week long camping / bike touring trips), I have never thought "Man, I wish I had a chair." I have often thought, "I have packed way too much stuff." There are a few things to consider. You have looked into weight and cost, but there is also space and time considerations. Volume: Do you have space on your rack to put this? How small does ...


9

Almost all saddles will be exchangeable -- there are a few rare (and very expensive ones) you wouldn't encounter unless you were looking for them which can't be exchanged. So yes, almost surely if you buy a new saddle you can use it on another bike. Note that some saddles are marketed as "road" or "mtb" - the mtb ones are possibly more durable, but this ...


9

By breaking in your Brooks B17 etc. leather saddle, you create the "valleys" in the leather for your sitbones and the crotch area of the pelvis bone. Therefore you need enough time for the leather to deform at these three areas. There is various information on the net. My experience is that about 500km of riding (so about 25h at 20 km/h) gives a good enough ...


8

There is a lot of complete and utter non-sense around Brooks saddles. When it comes to saddles, everything works for somebody and nothing works for everybody. Rule #1. If it's not reasonably comfortable on Day 1, it will never be comfortable. Saddle comfort is about getting the right shape to match your backside, leather saddles like the Brooks will ...


8

I bought a bike last year and after a few rides, I found the saddle very painful. I resisted on riding it, assuming that I'll get used to it, but it never happened, and I was even concerned that I haven't got the right size of a bike. However I got a silicon gel saddle cover and since then the pain stopped. I didn't need cycling shorts or pants either. ...


7

Was the bike from a shop and did the shop staff help with bike fit and saddle comfort? If the answer is yes, then it's a matter of building up those bottom muscles by having a similar ride every couple of days. After three or four rides she should be ok. If not, go back to the shop and seek their assistance. If you already spent money there, then fixing the ...


5

Time matters more than distance, but 1 km is a very short ride. She shouldn't have a lot of pain the next day. Either she was wearing poor clothing, the saddle shape, or bike fit are really bad for her, or she hit a bump hard, or some combination of those things. Or she doesn't really want to ride. First find out if she WANTS to ride. If she does, make sure ...


4

I have not just had them bend I have had them fracture. I took my saddle to the shop thinking they would say "wow how did that happen" and the response I got was it happens all the time - that saddle is a few years old. Aluminum will fatigue - low end seats have a limited life. A steel or titanium seat does not suffer from fatigue (will not at nearly the ...


4

A couple of things to be aware of: Seatposts come in a bizarre array of diameters, so the odds of a seatpost from one bike fitting another is not great. There are maybe 3-4 different schemes for mating seats with seatposts. Most "real" bikes use the scheme where two "rails" under the seat are held by a clamp atop the post, but there are a few other ...


4

I've purchased a couple of used leather saddles. The ones that were barely used or just broken in were fine, but there was one well-used one that was the exception. Its sit bone area was visibly lower on one side than the other, enough that it was the likely cause of an SI joint dysfunction for me. I'd say if it looks relatively new and close to the ...


4

As others have said, just because the bike shop says it's a good fit, doesn't make it so. Their incentive is to sell a bike off the floor so they'll find the one that fits best and sell it to you. I got a custom fit and I have longer thighs than most people. This meant that to get the seat position right, I had to have my saddle further back from the pedals ...


4

I have seen similar setups for MTB touring that use a large seatpack, a frame pack and a handlebar pack to get enough capacity. This setup also allows a better weight balance. Bikepacking.net is a good site for getting ideas for different setups. This site might also give you some ideas as well. I know we aren't supposed to recommend gear, but I've been ...


4

Saddle bags of different sizes used to be common for road bike touring in Europe. One popular brand was Carradice of Nelson. These days most people on similar trips seem to prefer small backpacks. I personally used one for a supported trip through Switzerland. The bag was roughly the same size as yours, and it definitely interfered with bike handling. The ...


3

I believe popular advice for MTB carving is to drop the outside pedal, rather than keeping the pedals horizontal. If you then dump your weight to the outside pedal (off your bars) you can lower your center of gravity some and in the case of pumping that weight dump, increase your traction. While keeping your pedals horizontal for obstacles increases your ...


3

Tilting the saddle forward relieves lower back pain. Don't take my word for it; here is a clinical trial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine: http://m.bjsm.bmj.com/content/33/6/398.short They tilt the saddle forward a lot (10-15 degrees), and show big improvements in back pain. I had this problem and it worked for me. If you look at the spine ...


3

By day 3 of my first long bicycle tour I realized how much stuff that I thought was essential was not. I ended up shipping stuff home, giving it away, and whatever else I could do. I would recommend that you skip the chair - even if it's lightweight, it's going to take up precious space.


3

The only thing that you might be able to bank on is the width of the saddle. I know specialized in particular has different widths for the same model of saddle based on where you sit bones are. Other than that, you will really need to try each saddle to know how it's going to feel. I have the Toupe on my road bike and it's fine for a road bike but I ...


3

(this is more of a supplemental answer to Pete's one) The answer is somewhat different if you already have back pain vs if you don't. Simply, if you already have pain it's much easier to make it worse, but if you don't an upright bike is fairly unlikely to cause it. The main factor is likely to be how far forward you lean while stilling on the bike, with a ...


3

The number of comments to your question is becoming quite large, so I thought I'd roll my comments up into an answer (of sorts). You ask whether the seat postures could cause back pains, and whilst I have no specialist knowledge in this area, I'd have to say from a purely empirical viewpoint that the answer must be "no". A lot of people ride a lot of miles ...


3

When I've had bicycles shipped, its generally just been left empty (on a used bike), or had a little plastic plug in it (on a new bike). If you do want to plug it with something (say, you're storing it without the seatpost for some reason and don't want any critters in there), you could plug it with some news paper or something which you can easily remove or ...


3

Definitely alloy drink can or other thin sheet metal as it is not compressible and is not affected by water, oil or grease.


2

Quite a few bike messengers tilt their saddle forward a little bit. Personally, I do it because if you're riding a long distance, it will put more weight on your arms, tilt you forward, make you more aerodynamic, it's better for speed, and it takes the weight off of your "sensitive areas". There are some pretty interesting studies about riders with perineum ...


2

Looking at the BLB Mosquito it is marketed as a "race" saddle which in the world of leather saddles seems to be short hand for narrow with the expectation that your cockpit setup has lots of handle bar drop (handle bars below saddle). Depending on the width of your sit bones, these saddles can be uncomfortable in a more upright position, as I have learned. ...


2

If you're at all concerned, just go for the natural colored cambium saddle, which I don't think is dyed, so it shouldn't be an issue with that one. I have not had any issue with colors tranferring from the slate colored saddle to my lighter colored synthetic shorts. However, After riding the slate colored saddle, the gray faded and now appears more brown. ...


2

Checking the tension on a Brooks saddle is part of the regular maintainance. Any bolt that doesn't have sufficient tension on it will move due to random road vibration. From http://www.brooksengland.com/getting-in-touch/faqs/saddle_maintenance/ Q: Why have the Rails / Tension Pin / Backplate on my Brooks saddle broken? By far the most common cause ...


2

Q1: A bad idea because it is already broken-in in a way that means it is irreparably shapes for the previous owners body? It is possible to reshape a leather saddle by first soaking it in water, resetting the shape then breaking the saddle in. I have seen it referred to as the "Blocking Technique" and have also seen warnings that it is possible to ...


2

You probably just have the wrong saddle. The width of the saddle has to match the width of your sit bones. My reading of your question is that only the very far back of the saddle is wide enough to comfortably support your sit bones. The first thing to do is determine the width of your sit bones. This article has some good suggestions. Is it possible ...


2

Old thread.. But here's how I fixed it on my bike... Cut an old inner tube into strips that wrap around the rails. Wrap them around the rails and tighten down. It should last virtually forever this way and won't damage the rails like sandpaper will. It might also slightly lower vibrations in your seat.


2

0) As suggested by Chris in AK, a bike fit may be a good idea. You may find your saddle is too low or something else, making it uncomfortable. 1) This is a personal choice. Go to your bike shop and see what they have -- some better shops will loan you saddles for a few days. A cruiser type saddle will be comfortable for short rides: but after 5-10 miles ...


2

The idea of the hole is to allegedly relieve pressure in the groin area. Works for some people, but depending on the shape of your groin, the edges of the hole can put more pressure on the groin. Part of this is due to hysteria to alleged impotency of riding a bike, and part of it due to it being more comfortable for some people. As for MTB vs Road, there ...



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