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10

The first ride gives almost everybody soreness. You should be using your sit bones with your saddle. You can roughly measure this at home. A too narrow or too wide saddle may give some pain (note this is not the same thing as soreness). Also, you may want to invest in padded bike shorts. Those help some people.


8

Most seat posts have a "minimum" insert of 3 to 4 inches. But this varies with the material and the thickness of the post, and the weight of the rider means the minimum might still be too little. As a tall rider I frequently have my seatposts up to maximum, and have bent several over time, and have fractured one frame. Now I always buy a 450 mm or 500 mm ...


8

The short (pun intended) answer is "yes." Or at the very least, "probably yes." One of the big things that makes saddles uncomfortable is pressure on the soft tissues between your "sit bones" (the ischial tuberosities). It may seem counterintuitive, but padded saddles can make this worse. The problem is that the padding allows your sit bones to sink into the ...


7

I'm going to disagree about padding and "getting used to it" a bicycle that fits well is surprisingly comfortable. Fitting well means that the seat supports you by your "sit bones" (ischial tuberosities) and doesn't put pressure on the soft structures of your crotch. Padding can actually make it worse. The answer to this question, How to Judge Comfort When ...


7

Like everything... it depends. If you're doing short distances, pretty much any saddle is fine, with or without padding. For longer distances, good shorts may help a saddle's shortcomings, and a good saddle will help make up for no or bad shorts. But for the most comfort, a good saddle teamed with well fitting shorts works best. Personally, I got the ...


6

This article, The Four and a Half Rules of Road Saddles, from Cervélo Cycles has been real helpful to me in think about saddles. I think the key points are: The saddle needs to be wide enough to support you "sit bones" but not so wide that it chafes on your thighs. The saddle has to be flat enough that the part between your sit bones doesn't press up on ...


6

The manufacturer of the seat post would have really answered this with the minimum mark. You should really maintain at least the same length within the frame. Aside from stability, if the seat post is too short, then you risk damaging the frame of the bike, because there is a higher force within the frame due to the same torque being required, but at a ...


5

As others have said, just because the bike shop says it's a good fit, doesn't make it so. Their incentive is to sell a bike off the floor so they'll find the one that fits best and sell it to you. I got a custom fit and I have longer thighs than most people. This meant that to get the seat position right, I had to have my saddle further back from the pedals ...


5

Saddles are highly personal-- one person likes a particular saddle, but you may not-- but there is a reason most cyclists who ride 50+ miles in one ride do so with shorts or bibs that contain some kind of chamois: it is more comfortable. That said, does it mean a person can't go long distances without a chamois? Of course not. There are people in the world ...


5

I ride a pro racer XL BMX. They are built for speed. I keep my seat down for 2 reasons. all my pedaling is done standing up -- power is everything for a racer. My saddle is made of one material only -- composite material -- its like sitting on a steel plate. I only use it to coast on and relax -- and that is only after the race. However, If I ...


4

Proper fit in an aerobar posture is designed to allow you to race well. In order to race well you will need to be comfortable enough to produce power, to reduce aerodynamic drag, and to handle the bike well and safely for the duration of your race. If your fit otherwise meets all your needs, you shouldn't be concerned about where your knee is positioned ...


4

From this question and the other regarding clothes, I think that you would be better off showing the bike or bikes you are referring to when using the term "road bike". Possibly you are not talking of a road bike like this: Because it would be just a waste of the money invested in weight reduction / aerodynamics to use it in plain clothes and with a ...


4

The idea of the hole is to allegedly relieve pressure in the groin area. Works for some people, but depending on the shape of your groin, the edges of the hole can put more pressure on the groin. Part of this is due to hysteria to alleged impotency of riding a bike, and part of it due to it being more comfortable for some people. As for MTB vs Road, there ...


4

Saddle bags of different sizes used to be common for road bike touring in Europe. One popular brand was Carradice of Nelson. These days most people on similar trips seem to prefer small backpacks. I personally used one for a supported trip through Switzerland. The bag was roughly the same size as yours, and it definitely interfered with bike handling. The ...


4

I have seen similar setups for MTB touring that use a large seatpack, a frame pack and a handlebar pack to get enough capacity. This setup also allows a better weight balance. Bikepacking.net is a good site for getting ideas for different setups. This site might also give you some ideas as well. I know we aren't supposed to recommend gear, but I've been ...


4

I noticed the same thing when I first got a B17. I fiddled with various angles and so forth, but in the end I found it's mainly just a matter of getting used to the smoother feel of leather as compared to the plastic you're used to. You slide over leather more easily, especially if you wear typical bike shorts, and this gives you the sensation that you're ...


4

None of the above techniques worked for me. I made no impression on the corrugated cardboard and the foil just showed a nice big bum-print after sitting a few different surfaces. I came up with my own technique that's a bit more trial and error but seemed to work for me. I got two small erasers, put them on a chair, sat on them and moved them around until ...


3

The only thing that you might be able to bank on is the width of the saddle. I know specialized in particular has different widths for the same model of saddle based on where you sit bones are. Other than that, you will really need to try each saddle to know how it's going to feel. I have the Toupe on my road bike and it's fine for a road bike but I ...


3

You probably just have the wrong saddle. The width of the saddle has to match the width of your sit bones. My reading of your question is that only the very far back of the saddle is wide enough to comfortably support your sit bones. The first thing to do is determine the width of your sit bones. This article has some good suggestions. Is it possible ...


3

Old thread.. But here's how I fixed it on my bike... Cut an old inner tube into strips that wrap around the rails. Wrap them around the rails and tighten down. It should last virtually forever this way and won't damage the rails like sandpaper will. It might also slightly lower vibrations in your seat.


3

Definitely alloy drink can or other thin sheet metal as it is not compressible and is not affected by water, oil or grease.


3

0) As suggested by Chris in AK, a bike fit may be a good idea. You may find your saddle is too low or something else, making it uncomfortable. 1) This is a personal choice. Go to your bike shop and see what they have -- some better shops will loan you saddles for a few days. A cruiser type saddle will be comfortable for short rides: but after 5-10 miles ...


3

Biking shorts could help but it's good to understand some things. First is that your coccyx shouldn't be touching the saddle or minimally if it does. A lot of people make the mistake of getting a cushy bike seat to alleviate such pain. The problem with squishy bike seats is that your sit bones sink down into the saddle and all the squishy stuff packs into ...


3

Saddles are in their very nature uncomfortable when used for long periods of time. A hole may help with ventilation and pressure on the groin, but any exaggerated claims about this design are unfounded. I use a saddle with no hole (a Brooks) that is comfortable and I've used cut-out saddles that have been comfortable, too. You want a saddle that supports ...


2

The description sounds like it is made up of multiple layers, boats built that way are very strong. Being thin, the wood will flex and return to its original shape – I wouldn't expect it to be like a Brooks saddle that molds itself to fit you over time. I think these saddles will be comfortable right out of the box. Or not. This article, The Four and a Half ...


2

Dirty little secret: Butt hair. As you ride, friction tugs on the hairs of your butt, irritating them. And at some point the hairs actually get kind of tangled and matted with each other, leading to extreme tension on the hairs. Of course, eventually the most vulnerable hairs get pulled out from the motion, but you can bypass that step by shaving your ...


2

I used to get sore and started getting numbness in my "private parts". I researched it and found this is a massive problem, well researched, many opinions, and many people selling snake oil solutions. I resolved my issues with a split saddle (with a big trench in the middle) which has the front of it tapering down. This forces me back onto my sit bones and ...


2

I feel like the padding helps a little bit as far as cushioning goes. The bigger benefit for myself seems to be the bib/short material. I generally have a lot less issues with chafing and its a lot easier to slide around on the saddle while wearing lycra. I'll sometimes ride my SSCX bike to work in normal clothes and I can tell the difference even on a ...


2

The issue with the C17 isn't so much that anything rubs off on you. Instead, it's that dyes from your clothes will easily rub on to this saddle. I wore a pair of Gap jeans the other day and now my Cambium C17 has a bluish glow around the edges. If it stains blue from demin, what color will it be if I wore my brown corduroy pants? What color will it be 6 ...


1

At that speed and distance you did a 3h ride. Anytime you do the same thing for 3h that you're not used to doing, you will encounter some "adjustment soreness". I am assuming you haven't done 3h rides in the past? Even grizzled veterans have to work back into saddle time. That said, get your fit double-checked by an experienced fitter. Be sure to explain ...



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