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11

I seem to have "fixed" this problem by raising it some. However, that got me thinking... what would happen if I raised it even more so that my legs would be straight (not bent at the knee) when the pedal was at the bottom? Would this give me increased power? Would this give me increased power? Saddle height is a well known as an important factor for power ...


10

The first ride gives almost everybody soreness. You should be using your sit bones with your saddle. You can roughly measure this at home. A too narrow or too wide saddle may give some pain (note this is not the same thing as soreness). Also, you may want to invest in padded bike shorts. Those help some people.


9

Most seat posts have a "minimum" insert of 3 to 4 inches. But this varies with the material and the thickness of the post, and the weight of the rider means the minimum might still be too little. As a tall rider I frequently have my seatposts up to maximum, and have bent several over time, and have fractured one frame. Now I always buy a 450 mm or 500 mm ...


8

The short (pun intended) answer is "yes." Or at the very least, "probably yes." One of the big things that makes saddles uncomfortable is pressure on the soft tissues between your "sit bones" (the ischial tuberosities). It may seem counterintuitive, but padded saddles can make this worse. The problem is that the padding allows your sit bones to sink into the ...


7

You've exceeded the manufacturer's recommendation on saddle positioning -- the clamp is supposed to clamp on the saddle between the stop lines. So, the saddle should be moved back. Many people exceed these recommendations, but its at your own risk. I'd be less inclined to do it on a lightweight or fancy saddle. The easiest way to move the saddle forward is ...


7

I'm going to disagree about padding and "getting used to it" a bicycle that fits well is surprisingly comfortable. Fitting well means that the seat supports you by your "sit bones" (ischial tuberosities) and doesn't put pressure on the soft structures of your crotch. Padding can actually make it worse. The answer to this question, How to Judge Comfort When ...


7

Like everything... it depends. If you're doing short distances, pretty much any saddle is fine, with or without padding. For longer distances, good shorts may help a saddle's shortcomings, and a good saddle will help make up for no or bad shorts. But for the most comfort, a good saddle teamed with well fitting shorts works best. Personally, I got the ...


6

This article, The Four and a Half Rules of Road Saddles, from Cervélo Cycles has been really helpful to me when pondering saddles. I think the key points are: The saddle needs to be wide enough to support your "sit bones" but not so wide that it chafes on your thighs. The saddle has to be flat enough that the part between your sit bones doesn't press up on ...


6

The manufacturer of the seat post would have really answered this with the minimum mark. You should really maintain at least the same length within the frame. Aside from stability, if the seat post is too short, then you risk damaging the frame of the bike, because there is a higher force within the frame due to the same torque being required, but at a ...


5

Saddles are highly personal-- one person likes a particular saddle, but you may not-- but there is a reason most cyclists who ride 50+ miles in one ride do so with shorts or bibs that contain some kind of chamois: it is more comfortable. That said, does it mean a person can't go long distances without a chamois? Of course not. There are people in the world ...


5

The more speed you get, the more balanced you will be, so at the beginning give a hard pedal stroke to get quickly some speed. You can also practice in a slight downhill road, this gives you speed easier. I recently taught a friend to ride a bicycle (30 years old!), and the solution was the slight downhill. Another trick is to look far ahead (dont look at ...


5

I ride a pro racer XL BMX. They are built for speed. I keep my seat down for 2 reasons. all my pedaling is done standing up -- power is everything for a racer. My saddle is made of one material only -- composite material -- its like sitting on a steel plate. I only use it to coast on and relax -- and that is only after the race. However, If I ...


5

None of the above techniques worked for me. I made no impression on the corrugated cardboard and the foil just showed a nice big bum-print after sitting a few different surfaces. I came up with my own technique that's a bit more trial and error but seemed to work for me. I got two small erasers, put them on a chair, sat on them and moved them around until ...


4

I noticed the same thing when I first got a B17. I fiddled with various angles and so forth, but in the end I found it's mainly just a matter of getting used to the smoother feel of leather as compared to the plastic you're used to. You slide over leather more easily, especially if you wear typical bike shorts, and this gives you the sensation that you're ...


4

Your bike probably does not have a suspension seat post. They are great for smoothing out small bumps on rough roads, and help with people whose anatomy is not 'cycle hardened'. For less fit riders, you do not need to unload the seat by standing for small bumps, so can make a ride less tiring. They also help soften the blow where you misjudge a bump and ...


3

You're totally right - they're for saddle bag straps. I don't have a search term, but the word "roll" might get you further.


2

The issue with the C17 isn't so much that anything rubs off on you. Instead, it's that dyes from your clothes will easily rub on to this saddle. I wore a pair of Gap jeans the other day and now my Cambium C17 has a bluish glow around the edges. If it stains blue from demin, what color will it be if I wore my brown corduroy pants? What color will it be 6 ...


2

I can't agree with the 'not comfortable from day 1' thing. It's the same thing as shoes-you have to break them in but also you adapt to them. A lot of the reason people give up on them is because people don't put the miles into them. I own, I think, about 10 brooks saddles and my partner has four on the same number of bikes. They do break in and change ...


2

The description sounds like it is made up of multiple layers, boats built that way are very strong. Being thin, the wood will flex and return to its original shape – I wouldn't expect it to be like a Brooks saddle that molds itself to fit you over time. I think these saddles will be comfortable right out of the box. Or not. This article, The Four and a Half ...


2

I used to get sore and started getting numbness in my "private parts". I researched it and found this is a massive problem, well researched, many opinions, and many people selling snake oil solutions. I resolved my issues with a split saddle (with a big trench in the middle) which has the front of it tapering down. This forces me back onto my sit bones and ...


2

Dirty little secret: Butt hair. As you ride, friction tugs on the hairs of your butt, irritating them. And at some point the hairs actually get kind of tangled and matted with each other, leading to extreme tension on the hairs. Of course, eventually the most vulnerable hairs get pulled out from the motion, but you can bypass that step by shaving your ...


2

It depends on the type of saddle. Leather saddles should generally be kept away from water and conditioned periodically. There are many pages on maintaining a leather saddle such as this one and this question and this FAQ from Brooks -- see the documentation that came with your saddle (or find the details from the manufacturer. Plastic/Vinyl/other ...


2

I feel like the padding helps a little bit as far as cushioning goes. The bigger benefit for myself seems to be the bib/short material. I generally have a lot less issues with chafing and its a lot easier to slide around on the saddle while wearing lycra. I'll sometimes ride my SSCX bike to work in normal clothes and I can tell the difference even on a ...


1

No. Based on your question and your comments, there is not a product that does what you are seeking (get your hips over the bottom bracket). The reason being that no one rides that far forward.1 The old style Profile is probably your best bet for getting forward: There are designs with a seat over the bottom bracket, even some that are made super-...


1

Can you tell if the pain is from pressure or abrasion? If it's pressure, then the it's probably because it was your first long ride. It takes a while to get your butt "battle hardened" for longer rides. Sadly, one quickly loses this after a week or two off the bike. If it's abrasion, then check the saddle to see if anything is rubbing during your pedal ...


1

At that speed and distance you did a 3h ride. Anytime you do the same thing for 3h that you're not used to doing, you will encounter some "adjustment soreness". I am assuming you haven't done 3h rides in the past? Even grizzled veterans have to work back into saddle time. That said, get your fit double-checked by an experienced fitter. Be sure to explain ...


1

This is the kind of thing that can go one of two ways. Either it will work, or it won't. The material for the seat does not always determine if it will be comfortable. I've seen a triple cushioned seat that would break your tailbone if you rode more than five miles on it; I've also seen a seat made of thick, hard resin-like material that felt like a pillow....


1

They are still made! Try a search for "bicycle coaster brake." You can narrow it to a "woman's" frame by adding "mixte" or "step through" or "woman's" to the key words. If you want gears add "3-speed" or "internally geared." Those searches will get you quite a range of bikes – from retro beach cruisers to very modern urban bikes. Once you find some that ...


1

It protects your balls from being smashed and when you ride if bike it feels nice to just sit down and be low to he ground with a low center of gravity. It makes it a lot easier to bust off tricks and just feel comfortable sitting down waiting for your turn in the bowls.



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