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8

The obvious answer would be to get some Cycling Jeans, i.e. jeans specifically designed for cycling in. These have reinforcement and stretch in the right places and often have other features such as deep pockets, a loop to carry a small lock and reflective strips. Levi, Rapha, Muxu and Swrve all make cycling jeans, so there's a fair amount of choice.


6

The best kind of saddle for touring is one which you find comfortable. The cut-out is intended to relieve pressure from your soft bits leaving most of your weight on your sit-bones. A very wide saddle might start to rub excessively inside your thigh on a long ride, while one with springs may be too bouncy at higher cadences and waste some of your effort. ...


4

The kind of biking you do is exactly the kind of biking I do. I was once a devotee of the Cult of Saddle Cushioning as well. I was wrong. Painfully, chafingly so. Ow. You don't want the gel. You don't want lots of cushioning. What you probably do want is springs (saddle suspension) and perhaps something a bit wider in back than your typical Lycra Laddish ...


4

The first problem with changing the wheel size is surely the brakes. Assuming they're rim brakes, they won't be in the right place for a smaller wheel. In any case, is it the distance to the ground that is an issue or the distance to the pedals? If it's the latter, then changing the wheel size won't help, however, you might get an extra 5 or 10 mm by using ...


3

A modern saddle has a single rail on each side that starts at the nose and runs to the rear of the saddle. A single or double bolt clamp attach the saddle to the seatpost. The Brooks web site show some profile images of their saddles. The images show two rails on each side of the saddle. They merge together at the nose of the saddle. They are reputed to be ...


2

ISM makes saddles that reduce pressure on the perineum and according to their Marketing Material is better for riding and having adequate blood flow. All of their models have no nose to the saddle, so the rider sits further forward on the seat, removing the pressure area that frequently occurs with saddles. I ride them on all of my bikes and have had no ...


2

If you align the gap of the clamp to sit over the gap of the seat post, you'll need much less clamping force to keep the seat from sliding down into the seat tube. There are likely some riders who place the clamp in a position they like strictly for the aesthetics, while others go for functionality. From what I remember, the position is determined by how ...


2

Overall riding style probably dictates the type of saddle you should choose. I do think that a cushy, fabric covered gel saddle would be more conducive to wearing out a piece of fabric than a smoother plastic or leather saddle. Another contributor to fabric wear is machine washing. Something to consider. For comparison, I wear Levi 501 shrink to fit ...


2

You are correct about the position of sit bones between C-D 2-5. If the leather on the saddle has stretched, even if you rest your sit bones in the C-D 2-5 region, your sit-bones might be digging into the metal part. Measure your sit-bones distance, reference to another SE question If your sit bones are narrower than widest part of the metal bracket ...


2

The question I would want to know is...how old are you and how tall you currently are? If you are young, like early teens, it's likely you'll be growing a few more inches, so you may not need to convert the bike wheels to a smaller size, ( that's asking for more problems with braking accuracy on the rims ), and trying to find a different seat. This may cause ...


2

As many others have stated it is possible to mount smaller wheels. The issue will be mainly a cost versus return on investment. The brakes may be able to be adjusted to reach and the frame may be spread to fit the wider hubs. The google images I have seen of a SEKAI sprint 1000 appear to be an older 10 speed. It most likely is equipped with a 5 gear ...


1

There are several different makers and models that are designed to be comfortable and safe for men. However, if you have known urogenital issues, then I would get with your doctor and go through some of the available models and see which one he/she would recommend. Once you have recommendations, then I would find a bike shop that lets you trial saddles for ...


1

Yeah, seat height and fore/aft position (and handlebar position) are more important than design. Seat height is especially important for knee pain -- having the seat too low is quite hard on the knees (as is pedaling in too difficult a gear). For the back, seat position fore/aft and handlebar position (both up/down and fore/aft) determine how much the ...


1

You need more than a couple of weeks to determine if a particular saddle is "comfortable." If you like the Brooks B-66, then by all means use it for the tour. All saddles, leather or not, must be "broken in" to some degree. Making sure your saddle heigth, fore and aft position to your knees being centered on the pedals at the right moment to keep your hips ...


1

Replace your hex seatbolt with a knobbed or winged bolt of the same strength and sizing specifications. Clamping knob: Wing screw: (I happened to see these at http://www.jwwinco.com/products/section8/, but do not know if they are up to spec. @WTHarper mentioned the McMaster-Carr site that has lots of options.)


1

you could check some of the Specialized Body Geometry saddles. They also feature the back cut out design as recommended by Kibbee, hopefully that should take some pressure off the tail bone. Also as they come in 3 different widths, you can choose the size that fits you best. The recommended width is determined based on the distance between the sit bones ...


1

A good seat should put most of the pressure sitz bones rather than the tail bone. You'll probably want to look for something like the Rido Saddle which has the back cut out and would probably minimize pressure on your coccyx. I can't say whether this type of saddle would work well for you, but in my mind it seems like it might do a good job.


1

I would try some different shaped saddles. Possible your Brooks is too wide which would encourage you to slide forward. Your KOPS (knee over pedal spindle) may be too far forward as well which won't help your situation. You might try pushing the seat back on the rails a couple of cm and shortening your stem to 100mm. Try different saddles first.


1

I'm no expert on the subject but a few months ago I put a road saddle I had on my hardtail mountain bike and within about 5 rides one of the rails busted. So, it seems that a maker of road saddles may use lighter / less solid material for the rails to keep weight down - but obviously that's just something to investigate when considering a saddle for MTB use. ...


1

Here's a link to a video that may help you: In this technique all you need is a piece of corrugated cardboard and some chalk.


1

Saddle comfort has many variables, addressing all of them can be scary or "drowning" for the new rider. One variable is obviously particular anatomy. As it is true that women differ from men, there can be huge differences among riders of the same gender. Also, even though there are women specific designs, a women's saddle is not radically different from a ...


1

I think a bike fit is in order at your LBS. You may need to adjust the saddle height, saddle of appropriate width, saddle angle, stem height, stem length, handlebar angle, figure out if the top tube length is appropriate, etc. Saddle discomfort is not isolated to just the saddle, but also geometry of riding. Most road bikes force you to sit on your "sit ...



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