Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

In my experience (week long camping / bike touring trips), I have never thought "Man, I wish I had a chair." I have often thought, "I have packed way too much stuff." There are a few things to consider. You have looked into weight and cost, but there is also space and time considerations. Volume: Do you have space on your rack to put this? How small does ...


8

The obvious answer would be to get some Cycling Jeans, i.e. jeans specifically designed for cycling in. These have reinforcement and stretch in the right places and often have other features such as deep pockets, a loop to carry a small lock and reflective strips. Levi, Rapha, Muxu and Swrve all make cycling jeans, so there's a fair amount of choice.


8

There is a lot of complete and utter non-sense around Brooks saddles. When it comes to saddles, everything works for somebody and nothing works for everybody. Rule #1. If it's not reasonably comfortable on Day 1, it will never be comfortable. Saddle comfort is about getting the right shape to match your backside, leather saddles like the Brooks will ...


6

By breaking in your Brooks B17 etc. leather saddle, you create the "valleys" in the leather for your sitbones and the crotch area of the pelvis bone. Therefore you need enough time for the leather to deform at these three areas. There is various information on the net. My experience is that about 500km of riding (so about 25h at 20 km/h) gives a good enough ...


4

The first problem with changing the wheel size is surely the brakes. Assuming they're rim brakes, they won't be in the right place for a smaller wheel. In any case, is it the distance to the ground that is an issue or the distance to the pedals? If it's the latter, then changing the wheel size won't help, however, you might get an extra 5 or 10 mm by using ...


3

(this is more of a supplemental answer to Pete's one) The answer is somewhat different if you already have back pain vs if you don't. Simply, if you already have pain it's much easier to make it worse, but if you don't an upright bike is fairly unlikely to cause it. The main factor is likely to be how far forward you lean while stilling on the bike, with a ...


3

The number of comments to your question is becoming quite large, so I thought I'd roll my comments up into an answer (of sorts). You ask whether the seat postures could cause back pains, and whilst I have no specialist knowledge in this area, I'd have to say from a purely empirical viewpoint that the answer must be "no". A lot of people ride a lot of miles ...


2

ISM makes saddles that reduce pressure on the perineum and according to their Marketing Material is better for riding and having adequate blood flow. All of their models have no nose to the saddle, so the rider sits further forward on the seat, removing the pressure area that frequently occurs with saddles. I ride them on all of my bikes and have had no ...


2

You are correct about the position of sit bones between C-D 2-5. If the leather on the saddle has stretched, even if you rest your sit bones in the C-D 2-5 region, your sit-bones might be digging into the metal part. Measure your sit-bones distance, reference to another SE question If your sit bones are narrower than widest part of the metal bracket ...


2

The question I would want to know is...how old are you and how tall you currently are? If you are young, like early teens, it's likely you'll be growing a few more inches, so you may not need to convert the bike wheels to a smaller size, ( that's asking for more problems with braking accuracy on the rims ), and trying to find a different seat. This may cause ...


2

As many others have stated it is possible to mount smaller wheels. The issue will be mainly a cost versus return on investment. The brakes may be able to be adjusted to reach and the frame may be spread to fit the wider hubs. The google images I have seen of a SEKAI sprint 1000 appear to be an older 10 speed. It most likely is equipped with a 5 gear ...


2

Quite a few bike messengers tilt their saddle forward a little bit. Personally, I do it because if you're riding a long distance, it will put more weight on your arms, tilt you forward, make you more aerodynamic, it's better for speed, and it takes the weight off of your "sensitive areas". There are some pretty interesting studies about riders with perineum ...


2

If you align the gap of the clamp to sit over the gap of the seat post, you'll need much less clamping force to keep the seat from sliding down into the seat tube. There are likely some riders who place the clamp in a position they like strictly for the aesthetics, while others go for functionality. From what I remember, the position is determined by how ...


2

Overall riding style probably dictates the type of saddle you should choose. I do think that a cushy, fabric covered gel saddle would be more conducive to wearing out a piece of fabric than a smoother plastic or leather saddle. Another contributor to fabric wear is machine washing. Something to consider. For comparison, I wear Levi 501 shrink to fit ...


1

You have to make sure that you're actually tightening the quick release down - it should leave an imprint on your hand when you close it down. If you put a product like frame saver in the frame, you'll need to tighten it down extra since that makes seat posts super slippery. See this thread as well.


1

the bolt should be behind the post. but it doesn't HAVE to be. If it fits better with it in front and the angle of the seat is comfortable it doesn't matter.


1

There are several different makers and models that are designed to be comfortable and safe for men. However, if you have known urogenital issues, then I would get with your doctor and go through some of the available models and see which one he/she would recommend. Once you have recommendations, then I would find a bike shop that lets you trial saddles for ...


1

Depending on your riding position on the road bike and the commuter bike, you will need up to 4cm wider seats on your commuter bike. Ask a friend to take a picture of you sitting on the bike, and review the picture, to determine your sitting position. See my answer here for the details with pictures: Sitbone width recommendations from SQ Lab


1

No saddles exist which are unsafe for mens' health. What exists are saddles which do not fit particular bodies and, most importantly, misconfigured saddles and bad riding postures which can give a man some health issues.


1

Saddle width depends on: sitbone width, and riding position. Usually touring is done in a more upright position, which requires a wider saddle vs. the same person in a sporty position. The hole in the middle is for your crotch. If that bone hits hard plastic/metal, it hurts a lot, and you cannot ride more. The B66 is a good choice for touring, probably it ...


1

Replace your hex seatbolt with a knobbed or winged bolt of the same strength and sizing specifications. Clamping knob: Wing screw: (I happened to see these at http://www.jwwinco.com/products/section8/, but do not know if they are up to spec. @WTHarper mentioned the McMaster-Carr site that has lots of options.)


1

I'm no expert on the subject but a few months ago I put a road saddle I had on my hardtail mountain bike and within about 5 rides one of the rails busted. So, it seems that a maker of road saddles may use lighter / less solid material for the rails to keep weight down - but obviously that's just something to investigate when considering a saddle for MTB use. ...


1

Here's a link to a video that may help you: In this technique all you need is a piece of corrugated cardboard and some chalk.


1

Saddle comfort has many variables, addressing all of them can be scary or "drowning" for the new rider. One variable is obviously particular anatomy. As it is true that women differ from men, there can be huge differences among riders of the same gender. Also, even though there are women specific designs, a women's saddle is not radically different from a ...


1

I think a bike fit is in order at your LBS. You may need to adjust the saddle height, saddle of appropriate width, saddle angle, stem height, stem length, handlebar angle, figure out if the top tube length is appropriate, etc. Saddle discomfort is not isolated to just the saddle, but also geometry of riding. Most road bikes force you to sit on your "sit ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible