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11

In my experience (week long camping / bike touring trips), I have never thought "Man, I wish I had a chair." I have often thought, "I have packed way too much stuff." There are a few things to consider. You have looked into weight and cost, but there is also space and time considerations. Volume: Do you have space on your rack to put this? How small does ...


8

There is a lot of complete and utter non-sense around Brooks saddles. When it comes to saddles, everything works for somebody and nothing works for everybody. Rule #1. If it's not reasonably comfortable on Day 1, it will never be comfortable. Saddle comfort is about getting the right shape to match your backside, leather saddles like the Brooks will ...


7

By breaking in your Brooks B17 etc. leather saddle, you create the "valleys" in the leather for your sitbones and the crotch area of the pelvis bone. Therefore you need enough time for the leather to deform at these three areas. There is various information on the net. My experience is that about 500km of riding (so about 25h at 20 km/h) gives a good enough ...


7

Was the bike from a shop and did the shop staff help with bike fit and saddle comfort? If the answer is yes, then it's a matter of building up those bottom muscles by having a similar ride every couple of days. After three or four rides she should be ok. If not, go back to the shop and seek their assistance. If you already spent money there, then fixing the ...


6

I bought a bike last year and after a few rides, I found the saddle very painful. I resisted on riding it, assuming that I'll get used to it, but it never happened, and I was even concerned that I haven't got the right size of a bike. However I got a silicon gel saddle cover and since then the pain stopped. I didn't need cycling shorts or pants either. ...


4

Time matters more than distance, but 1 km is a very short ride. She shouldn't have a lot of pain the next day. Either she was wearing poor clothing, the saddle shape, or bike fit are really bad for her, or she hit a bump hard, or some combination of those things. Or she doesn't really want to ride. First find out if she WANTS to ride. If she does, make sure ...


4

I have not just had them bend I have had them fracture. I took my saddle to the shop thinking they would say "wow how did that happen" and the response I got was it happens all the time - that saddle is a few years old. Aluminum will fatigue - low end seats have a limited life. A steel or titanium seat does not suffer from fatigue (will not at nearly the ...


3

By day 3 of my first long bicycle tour I realized how much stuff that I thought was essential was not. I ended up shipping stuff home, giving it away, and whatever else I could do. I would recommend that you skip the chair - even if it's lightweight, it's going to take up precious space.


3

(this is more of a supplemental answer to Pete's one) The answer is somewhat different if you already have back pain vs if you don't. Simply, if you already have pain it's much easier to make it worse, but if you don't an upright bike is fairly unlikely to cause it. The main factor is likely to be how far forward you lean while stilling on the bike, with a ...


3

The number of comments to your question is becoming quite large, so I thought I'd roll my comments up into an answer (of sorts). You ask whether the seat postures could cause back pains, and whilst I have no specialist knowledge in this area, I'd have to say from a purely empirical viewpoint that the answer must be "no". A lot of people ride a lot of miles ...


3

Tilting the saddle forward relieves lower back pain. Don't take my word for it; here is a clinical trial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine: http://m.bjsm.bmj.com/content/33/6/398.short They tilt the saddle forward a lot (10-15 degrees), and show big improvements in back pain. I had this problem and it worked for me. If you look at the spine ...


2

Quite a few bike messengers tilt their saddle forward a little bit. Personally, I do it because if you're riding a long distance, it will put more weight on your arms, tilt you forward, make you more aerodynamic, it's better for speed, and it takes the weight off of your "sensitive areas". There are some pretty interesting studies about riders with perineum ...


2

If you're at all concerned, just go for the natural colored cambium saddle, which I don't think is dyed, so it shouldn't be an issue with that one. I have not had any issue with colors tranferring from the slate colored saddle to my lighter colored synthetic shorts. However, After riding the slate colored saddle, the gray faded and now appears more brown. ...


2

Looking at the BLB Mosquito it is marketed as a "race" saddle which in the world of leather saddles seems to be short hand for narrow with the expectation that your cockpit setup has lots of handle bar drop (handle bars below saddle). Depending on the width of your sit bones, these saddles can be uncomfortable in a more upright position, as I have learned. ...


2

I always find it funny that people complain about a bike saddle hurting after one ride. If someone hadn't run in years, then went out and ran and ended up with shin splints, most people wouldn't run to the store and complain about their shoes. Physical activity that hasn't been pursued in some time will cause discomfort. I recommend everyone get a pair ...


1

I have had Ti rails break on me on a particular seat brand that i no longer use. I am a heavy mountain bike users: lots of climbs, jumps, and DH. Its not just you. I suggest the seats with Cromo rails. So far I have never had any WTB saddles break on me that have cromo rails for example. Forget the TI and Aluminum, Cromo is also better for riders 200 lbs+ ...


1

I don't know anything specifically about this model saddle, but all leather saddles share the same group of strengths and weaknesses. Leather Saddles have a few drawbacks. They require a break in period. They require regular maintenance, more so when used in foul weather. They tend to be heavier than most current saddle designs. There are mixed reviews ...


1

Aside from getting a TT specific bike, 1) Get a new seatpost which allows for more saddle adjustment 2) Get a new saddle are probably your options best options. I don't think the padding will help. When you added aero bars, you changed the riding geometry, and pretty much aside from swapping out stems/bars and tweaking heights there, your only other ...


1

You have to make sure that you're actually tightening the quick release down - it should leave an imprint on your hand when you close it down. If you put a product like frame saver in the frame, you'll need to tighten it down extra since that makes seat posts super slippery. See this thread as well.


1

the bolt should be behind the post. but it doesn't HAVE to be. If it fits better with it in front and the angle of the seat is comfortable it doesn't matter.


1

Saddle width depends on: sitbone width, and riding position. Usually touring is done in a more upright position, which requires a wider saddle vs. the same person in a sporty position. The hole in the middle is for your crotch. If that bone hits hard plastic/metal, it hurts a lot, and you cannot ride more. The B66 is a good choice for touring, probably it ...


1

I'm no expert on the subject but a few months ago I put a road saddle I had on my hardtail mountain bike and within about 5 rides one of the rails busted. So, it seems that a maker of road saddles may use lighter / less solid material for the rails to keep weight down - but obviously that's just something to investigate when considering a saddle for MTB use. ...


1

I have what most people would call an extreme forward tilt on my saddle. I use a racing saddle with a large cut out. The reason I use this angle is to stop me getting pressure on the perenium. I have been riding like this for around twenty years to the derision of "experts" wherever I go. I recently rode the new forest epic. My first sportive with no ...


1

Depending on your riding position on the road bike and the commuter bike, you will need up to 4cm wider seats on your commuter bike. Ask a friend to take a picture of you sitting on the bike, and review the picture, to determine your sitting position. See my answer here for the details with pictures: Sitbone width recommendations from SQ Lab


1

I found this video, and decided to do like him. He puts some kind of extension on his power drill, and on the end he puts a tiny 1 inch steel wire wheel. He drives the wheel up and down in the seat tube for some time until the rust is gone. I tried hard but never found a wirewheel this small in my country, at least not one that would fit on an extension. ...



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