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-6

No. If you do this you run the risk of you being "just around the corner" when a motorist enters the corner behind you and being in his path without giving him sufficient reaction time to your presence. It's not your job to babysit other road users by using aggressive road behaviour. If it was I'd pull my car over to the fast hand lane of the motorway and ...


12

I'd say yes, definitely take the lane. Proactive disarming of a hazardous situation is (almost) always the best way to go and taking the lane is often an effective tool. In your situation described above, if a motorists attempts to pass you and then a car comes the other way the first thing they will do is swerve back on to the correct side or slam the ...


5

It's exactly the right way to deal with it. If people passing you is dangerous for anyone, then you need to make it extremely inconvenient, and even illegal, for them to do so. Once you're beyond the complex road that makes it necessary for you to take the lane, be a good fellow and get to the side of the road and let them by. I've only very rarely ...


16

Yes, you should absolutely be taking the lane, provided the car behind you will have time to slow down when you move to take the lane. Passing too close, passing on a blind corner, passing that endangers others and yourself, these are all equally dangerous. This sounds like a dangerous situation all around, I highly recommend you record your ride so if ...


1

If somebody in a car draws level with you and you feel the situation is dangerous, just brake and they'll whizz by. I've done this several times; the motorist has never tried to stay level or slowed down to let me catch up. And even if the motorist does slow down, you can just stay safely behind them, where it's much harder for them to hurt or intimidate ...


13

My experience is mostly in Canada as well (southern Ontario), so perhaps I can provide a closer-to-home viewpoint. I bike in a city with poor infrastructure that was designed for cars first, and everything else second (though that's changing). This means I get into a lot of situations where drivers honk at me, typically around 1 incident per 100km biked ...


1

What is their intent? To get you out of their way, and to get you off the road. You already know when your tire is flat, something fell off, or your shirt is un-tucked. Sometimes you might get a quick beep if they are going to pass. You might know the person as well and they are being friendly, but I asked my wife not to honk at me from behind. How ...


2

If you're in the correct position, you can either fight, flight or embarrass. If you're in the wrong place, than just admit you're wrong, wave an apologetic hand and move on. Assuming you're in the right (and it sounds like you were), then first option is to fight. A scowling look, with a snarling "what?" and then pointing out the helmet cam on the lid ...


20

Broadly, not a lot. Legally it's probably technically unlawful on several grounds (horn not used as a warning device, causing alarm, loud noise, possibly harassment), but they're all petty offences and unlikely to get a useful response from Police. If it happens in front of a cop they might pull the motorist over for a chat, but that's unlikely. My answer ...


4

Bullying I am assuming that you are female, given that your screen name is Michelle. While there can be many suggestions about safe riding, the main point here is that these (male?) drivers are just bullying you. Plain and simple. One solution some cyclists use is to carry an obvious helmet camera, so that their behavior is witnessed. Edit: on ...



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