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3

this is a question I've given a great deal of thought and experimentation to, after an accidental discovery some years ago. Long story short: cycle where the kerb-side wheel of a car or truck would be, and magically, Jedi-mind-trickily, almost ALL drivers give you plenty of room when passing, wait patiently to pass, and are not in the slightest bit annoyed. ...


0

Eyes - look straight at the driver and hold the gaze until they see you. Human brains are wired to detect and pick out eyes/eyeballs in the visual field. Try it - as a cyclist you can see clearly when the driver/other cyclist notices you. And if they still don't see you, it gives a split second more warning to react appropriately before they pull out.... ...


1

There are organizations that offer riding in traffic classes, they even plan with you your best commute route, I would look into that as a way to gain confidence. Keep in mind that if you are afraid or you doubt at some intersection or maneouvre it can be dangerous if someone decides they don't want to wait for you to make your move. Confidence and paying ...


0

It seems to me that the types of injuries are different for motorbikes and bicycles, so that the requirements are different, and I can't see that body armour is useful for bicycles. Common motorbike incidents are when a rider comes off the bike at fairly high speed, either because they lost control or in a collision, and the clothing is designed to protect ...


0

If you're commuting, and using a folding bike as many do, bear in mind that the joint on the horizontal tube is a singe point of failure. If that joint fails for any reason, you're suddenly going to be riding a pair of unicycles instead of a bicycle. You'll almost certainly hit the ground face-first (especially if you use clipless pedals) and only a ...


1

If your main worry is being seen by cars, then a superbright light isn't really the way forward. Besides being dazzling/blinding, a front light does very little for visibility from the sides and from behind, from which many (most?) collisions occur. A front light helps your visibility mainly when a car pulls out of or turns into a side road across your path ...


-2

How to put this politely.... Disagree with you buddies all you like, but stop being a Selfish Cyclist who cares for no one but himself. Consider that your actions in running a light that bright on the road are the ones that make otherwise normal drivers cyclist hating psychopaths. The law will not be on your side if your light is bright enough to be ...


3

Yes. Blinding oncoming traffic is certainly not in your best interest. Operating multiple running lights like you see on a semi truck would be better than purchasing a high power front or rear facing light. A brighter rear red light, with a touch of blue for colorblindness like stoplights have, is good to see you from behind. A more powerful front facing ...


5

Blinding road users will be the result of the following factors: Total light output Mirror design (how is the light shaped) How you aimed your light Most trail lights (and high output battery powered lights) use a mirror that casts the light in a symmetrical shape. This means light is cast up, down, left and right. Light cast above the horizon is what ...


-3

Wear a full Batman suit with a night reflective cape. The Batman suit should offer good visibility for the person wearing the suit, will have a cool cape that flaps in the wind, and has places to put all those gadgets so you don't have to have them in your ears and eyes. I don't bicycle on the road anymore but as a driver you can bet I'll be staring down ...


1

You can easily test if your light is too bright. Leave it on your bike and see how it looks. Nowadays there are lots of too bright LED flashlights and headlamps the market that were not designed for cycling. Problem is they flood the light to very wide angle. I would recommend a light made for cycling that has different modes for different use cases.


5

Yeah, it's like overkill if you're riding on the street. I use a Busch & Muller lamp powered by a dynamo hub and it puts out plenty of light even when riding downhill on potholed roads. Also keep in mind lumens is only one factor in determining light quality. It's sort of like having a computer with a fast processor but not enough memory. More ...


2

It's not just the number of lumens you have (*) -- its the distribution. You need to aim your light at the ground at an appropriate angle, not into the eyes of motorists. If you have something like a flood light like the coast guard uses, thats no good to aim -- bicycle-specific lights will be easier to aim in a proper manner. If your light is aimed ...


3

Be assertive. If you need to take up a whole lane take up a whole lane, you have as many rights (in the UK at least) as cars. It will annoy drivers, but I'd rather someone shouted abuse at me as they drove past than have someone hit me because they couldn't see me. Also stay 2-3 feet out from the pavement/sidewalk and parked cars. This will make cars slow ...


2

Visible clothing has been mentioned a couple times before. I'd like to add one suggestion within that theme: you can even wear fluorescent yellow or orange clothing, like this one I found on Google's image search: It's light weight, practicial, dirt cheap and very visible. Especially in dawn or dusk, they seem to emit light themselves. And they are ugly. ...


-1

Get your country to invest in proper infrastructure. When people driving and people cycling do not share the same roads, the chances on accidents are much smaller. But the infrastructure has to be made right. Learn from the experience the Dutch gained in the last 30 years and build what we get now, not what we now know does not work the best (like those ...


1

Most of the advice you're getting here is great, but a few caveats: When hand-signaling, wave your hand a little, or even raise and lower your arm a couple times. I believe it triggers an instinctive response in people who see that in their peripheral vision ("Ooh! Who's that waving at me? Do I know this person?"), and they notice me far more often. As ...


15

There are tips here: Car Bike Collisions I especially like the first tip: Also there are tips about riding in traffic on pages 13 through 30 of this document: Cycling Skills Ontario’s Guide to Safe Cycling It's all good, including the pages about trucks and buses. Also the (Ontario-specific) law about riding on the right is interesting: HTA 147 - ...


6

Speaking as a driver, what you can do: Be visible. During the day, this means bright-colored clothing. At night, lights and broad retro-reflector stripes. Urban camouflage may be fashionable, but it's also a good way to keep drivers from seeing you. Be predictable. Because you are one of the slowest vehicles on the road, everyone else is reacting to ...


7

In the long term, you can also lobby and campaign for better cycling provision. The personal safety advice (better visibility etc.) is all valuable, but there is only so much you can do when a junction s poorly designed and creates conflict between different road users. Basically, if you feel unsafe on the road, then the road needs to be designed better. ...


7

Be visible, be predictable (e.g. obey the rules, give hand signs, avoid sudden turns or braking) and leave a safety margin for the errors of others (e.g. don’t ride too close to parked cars). Personally I prefer riding on roads like any other vehicle and with quite a bit of distance to the curb. Edit: I forgot “be attentive”. E.g. Look over your shoulder ...


30

As cyclists, we are vulnerable to any collision. A collision with a truck, bus, car, bicycle, pram, skateboard, rollerblader, pedestrian, dog, or even a domestic cat, will almost always cause a problem, if not an injury. Vehicle drivers are just people like us, except that they are in a comfortable safe box, maybe with crying kids in the back, and a have ...


1

I thankfully never was in that situation, but if the driver doesn't let you go or is getting out of the car, use the bike's advantages over the car : Go in the wrong direction in a one-way (using the sidewalk if need be) Go off the road using pedestrian's facilities (sidewalk, park) Change direction quickly or go back the other way on the same road All ...


4

Call the police. Get his plate number, his description and report him to the authorities. Idiots like that are too thick to talk to, it takes an officer to get through to them. Call the cops while you're riding, tell them you fear for your safety and let them hear the idiot shouting at you.


12

Pull off the road sooner. Sure, you have a right to be there, but it was quite clear that this creep wasn't prepared to accept that. Your safety is more important than taking the lane. Noting his license-plate number and car make/model as he vanishes into the distance isn't a bad idea either, in case you see him again.


4

I don't know your body condition: so ... "maybe"? Or, "maybe not now, but maybe soon"? I did 36 km per day (18 km each way): my body is male, aged 50+, weight 75 kg, height 182 cm, but with normal BP. For the first month or two, I didn't do 5 days/week. Some alternatives for you might include: Fewer days/week Only do it one-way somehow (e.g. cycle there, ...


0

Everyone is different (apart from physical condition, there's also tolerance of discomfort, strength of will, etc.), so I would suggest to simply borrow a bike from someone and try (carefully) for yourself... Anyway I agree with other answers that if you have no "blocking" medical conditions, you should be able to train yourself for this.


2

You might be capable to do this, but not immediately. Endurance is an ability which can be trained very well. Except for people with serious health conditions or disabilities, everyone should be able to train themselves to a level where they can ride 2x16km a day comfortably. But wanting too much too early can be counter-productive. I would recommend you to ...


3

Adding to the answer by @andy256 (especially the need to discuss with a doctor)- 32km / day from cold is almost certainly too much, doing it 5 days in row definitely too much, but something that you (baring health problems other than blood pressure) should be able to build up to. You friend is probably right - unless he is saying you will never be able to ...


8

32km per day is a lot for some one who is out of shape. I added the [commuter] tag to your post. If you click on it, you'll see hundreds of posts about commuting. Some are like this one, so your question may get closed if it's a duplicate. Since you know you have health issues, the conservative advice is to discuss your plan with your doctor. If it's ...


2

Well there is only one rule - adjust your speed to the situation. Doesn't matter if it's falling rocks, a sudden animal crossing road, people, deaf/earphone people, kids, oil on road behind corner... You don't even have to use noises to notify people - it usually surprises them and they make sudden moves. Just pass them at safe distance with safe speed (I ...


3

You already known the answer (2), but do not seem to care much for it. The reality is that you are the fastest user on the shared path thus you bear the most responsibility. I would suggest When approaching, slow down to an appropriate speed. Make an attempt to notify (bell or calling out), even if they have head phones on. If they do not respond or ...


4

I know you're looking for a different answer, and I'm not trying to be preachy, either. This just touches on a subject that's been on my mind a lot lately. There's no fool-proof way to get pedestrians to move out of your way. No matter how loud your yell/bell/horn/brake noise is, there will always be a chance that someone won't react as you predict. ...


0

One thing also to consider is a minimum distance. If you are a sweater (i.e. one who sweats) a shower is a necessary part of bike commuting. If you are going to take the time to get all your gear together, pack a change of clothes, and ride your bike, 5 miles is too short. I sweat in 5 miles. My minimum distance is 10 miles, and max is 15. Anything more than ...


5

Just about all pedals for bicycles will use the same threads. According to Sheldon brown the standard size is 9/16" x 20 tpi threads. One piece "American" cranks use 1/2" x 20 tpi threads, but these are only found on low end bikes and children's bikes. There's been a couple other sizes used in the past, but almost all modern bicycles will use the two above ...



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