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I think this question is similar to what can I do to my road bike so it handles rock gardens better. The real answer here is disc brakes. This problem is extremely common here in both the fall and spring. I personally found that the far worse situation was the ABS effect that happened when you grabbed the brakes hard and had only sections of the rim that ...


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For A, C, and D, which are variations on material freezing to the rim during a ride, frequent light braking will do a lot to help - so it becomes much more of an issue on the open road than around town. The brakes are quite good at removing anything other than a smooth skin of ice - so we want to stop that forming in the first place. In these conditions ...


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The most practical mechanical effect I can think of is that placing a bag on the right side may protect the rear derailleur in the event of a tip-over. On the other hand, it can sometimes be tricky to install bags on the right because they can interfere with the loop of derailleur cable. The only other mechanical consideration that hasn't been mentioned is ...


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Perhaps you need inspiration to get started. Check out this Kris Home video:


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Here are a couple of insights about getting started, that might be helpful. 1. Use walking sticks for a few weeks or months - you will know when to throw them away. 2. Get good body armour - I particularly recommend Kris Holme gloves. You will also need knee and elbow pads, and a good helmet.


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I'm speaking from personal experience here. Looking at the bicycle from the back. The drive train is on the right side, and when you use the kickstand it leans to the left. When I commute to work, I tend to put my messenger bag with rear rack attachments on the left side. Mostly because the bike is already leaning that way. Once, when I was getting ...


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Both sides will be essentially equally safe. The difference in weight between the sides is quite small. Looking on Weight Weenies a cassette is about 300 grams, a crankset is lets say 800 grams, a chain is another 250 grams, and lets say a freehub is an 400 grams. This means the right side has about 2 kg more stuff on it than the left for the drivetrain ...


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The bike is designed to support your weight during normal driving conditions, namely sitting. However you can usually stand up with little extra tear since the frame is constructed to support your entire weight on any one pedal (Usually how you get on to the bike in the first place). Care should be taken as to how much force you apply to the drive chain, but ...


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Some sports physiological professor at a USA university point out that cycling is not a sitting sport. I totally agreed now. I have been cycle commuting over 16 years and recently started riding standing up for a round trip of about 15KM. I removed a 24' wheel bike's saddle to force me stand up all the way back and forth and enjoyed it very much.


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Here's footage of my commute to work in Manhattan. It was filmed using a Polaroid Cube camera. I stuck it onto my handlebars using the Polaroid-made handlebars mount. YouTube allows you to view the video in various resolutions using the "gear" dropdown. Even in 1080p reading license plates can be a dodgy proposition. I say it depends majorly on lighting ...


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I have a Contour Roam2 which I use at 720p and it gets registration numbers about 6 times out of 10 which isn't bad at all. The usual reason for them not being clear is vibration on my bike (typically due to a poor road surface) but I'm used to reading the registration numbers out aloud now. Edit: I often wipe the lens when I'm stopped at lights etc if it's ...


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I'm interested in bicycle cameras at the moment, although for reasons other than reading number plates, and I have found several cameras to be available, which look pretty decent. There's a much wider choice in this market than there was a few years ago. So while I can't say explicitly "such-and-such a camera will read a number plate at 20 paces" I'm happy ...


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A Mobius Action Cam w/wide angle lens at 720p might do the job. I have no experience with the Mobius but have played around with earlier '808' key fob cameras and discovered a wide angle lens was the way to go to read license plates when used as a dash cam. Techmoan has a very detailed video review of the Mobius. ...


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I'm not sure it would work in this case, but you can get brake nuts with a thread inside the cap. http://problemsolversbike.com/products/sheldon_fender_nuts I would definitely not mount the fender between the bolt and the brake mount. P-Clips are cheap and will allow you to mount the fender on the fork.


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Do not do that. That's dangerous because those stays are often made of soft steel and it's easy to bend or damage them, which means they'll pull out from under the bolt head. In that case you end up with a loose bolt on your brake caliper. Which is bad. Two alternatives spring to mind: fenders that mount directly to the fork via clips or bands (or hose ...


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I can't comment on whether using the same bolt is safe or not, but one possible workaround would be clip-on fenders. These just attach to the frame of the bike and don't need to be attached to the fork at all. They're not as sturdy/durable as fully installed fenders but will avoid any issues with a lack of mounting space on the fork. For example, Planet ...



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