New answers tagged

4

According to UCI's official regulations Section 1.3.031 (emphasis mine) Wearing a rigid safety helmet shall be mandatory during competitions and training sessions in the following disciplines: track, mountain bike, cyclo-cross, trials and BMX, para-cycling, as well as during cycling for all events. During competitions on the road, a rigid ...


-1

Before taking it in for a tuneup, it'd be worth checking if any spoke nipples have seized up. Then you can spray them with penetrating oil (wd-40 or gt-85 ... ) giving it plenty of time to soak in so that your bike mechanic is able to true the wheel properly. When you get the bike tuned up, see if you can watch the mechanic whilst they do it. That way, you'...


6

Get the bike serviced, giving yourself enough time to thoroughly test it, so that if the service introduces any problems, you discover them long before your trip. There is no standard test for worthiness, you'll have to rely on your judgement.


1

In my experience, resolution doesn't really matter, as long as you're in the territory of High Defniition. What has much more effect is the overall brightness of the scene, which directly affects the "sensor speed" I've got a gopro3 and during a sunny day I could make out the screws holding a licence plate on a car when they're doing 100+ km hour in the ...


2

Do you use pedal's with cleats? Road shoe cleats will add a bit of thickness to your shoe's sole. MTB cleats are recessed into the sole, but the sole is thicker, which may help too. This could be an expensive way to gain a small amount. Depending on the stop, there may be a kerb/curb where you can place a foot that is higher than the road surface. ...


1

Down the road from me is a long road with two humps, I go down hill and the first has a gentle slope, I've never done less than full speed pedalling like a maniac over it. The other is steep, my strategy is to either jump it, or hit it on an angle standing with knees flexed and loose body to take the impact, the only speed difference (these are both down a ...


10

Try stopping with one foot down, leaning the bike over and leaving your dominant leg on the pedal with the pedal forward and up ready for a power stroke. By leaning the bike over you can get lots of clearance. I can often even remain on the saddle. When you're ready to go, push off with your non-dominant leg (which is touching the ground) and give a strong ...


3

With a decent bike such as the one you linked to, it's not so much a question whether the bike can handle it, but it depends on how much you can handle. How fast you can go over a bump depends a lot on your riding technique: if you are able to shift your weight in the right way you can significantly increase the speed to go over the bump. If you are able to ...


0

In my country, cycle helmets are mandated by law for use on the road. It is illegal to sell a non-certified helmet for the purposes of riding on the road. So any accident where you're not wearing an approved and certified helmet could result in insurance cover being refused, regardless of whether the helmet is a cause or a mitigator. Like having your car ...


0

It depends, if you get a WWII surplus helmet, then no, definitely not. They do not meet any safety regulations and have no cushioning to absorb the impact of a crash. A modern combat helmet (i.e. MICH 2000s, PASGTs) work fine because they have a cushioned lair that can absorb the impact. In fact, many special forces units still wear them when they use ...


6

For the UK there are traffic statistics available. This graph from the 2015 Road Traffic Estimates shows the general trend for cars. There are detailed tables of traffic flow available. There is also geographical data available in the form an interactive map. This isn't broken down by time of day, but should give you an indication of which roads ...


2

I put my road bike on a trainer, raised up my desk at work, and decided I could casually ride all day long while typing away at my desk. At first, it was a lot of fun and I was effortlessly logging a good 20 miles a day. However, after the first couple days my tail bone started to hurt a lot. I got a softer seat, and it continued to hurt. I'm no doctor, but ...



Top 50 recent answers are included