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0

For me a decent commuting camera is Drift Stealth 2. It's small and light and doesn't distract you when you ride, has long battery life (about 3 hours) and can record footage in a continuous loop, so you will never lack memory to keep a video. And it's cheap.


3

Yes - replace it as soon as convenient. You might go another year or two with it in that state, but its a couple of dollars for a straddle cable. Check the front one too, and consider replacing both cables. While you're at it, give all the brake cables an eyeball, and if you find any damage then replace them all. A pair of inners costs under $20. ...


4

Have you recently replaced a tire or tube? If so, then the tire may not be properly seated. Remove the wheel, hold it in your lap lying flat, and rotate the wheel around looking at the edge of the rim and tire. You are looking for a "low spot" where the tire appears to "disappear" down into the wheel. It will be slight, but it doesn't take much. My old road ...


2

Derailer cables operating an indexed derailer wear out much faster than brake cables, and in fact brake cables can go a long time before needing replacement. However, while a broken derailer cable is inconvenient, a broken brake cable is dangerous. I would replace it right away. Brake cable replacement, including the labor, is cheap--certainly when compared ...


4

Yes, at least one strand has broken. Looks like this happened where the cable was previously under the fastening bolt. Since then, the cable has been let out, maybe to allow for new brake pads? It would probably last a while before more strands break. But a new cable is only around $5. It's very important to be able to stop your bike reliably, so I would ...


5

Marseille was voted worst French city for cyclist in 2013 (see here), but apparently they are trying to change that. Here are potentially useful links: maps of cycle lanes in the city, and a city bike rental scheme run by the city. You should keep the following in mind also: Marseille gets very hot in the summer and is one of the worst French city for air ...


0

When I upgraded an old 1970s road bike into a commuter, I put a front Sanyo dynohub on it. I love it. I never have to worry about dead batteries and so I can keep the light on all the time -- which increases my visibility considerably. A huge safety plus in my book. As to costs: the dynohub and wheel cost me $85 with free shipping on the giant auction site ...


1

While we do not have Idaho Rules here in Washington, there has been a push for it at times. A "dead red" law took effect for cyclists earlier this year, but that's a far cry from Idaho Rules.


1

I'm a year round commuter, and here in the Pacific Northwet it is often dark on the ride both to and from work during the winter. While I've been considering a hub generator for my commuter, I don't think I can really justify the cost. If I went touring on multi-day rides [or won the lottery], then yes I would get a hub generator [or generators]. Most of ...


4

...is replacing his battery powered lights the best way of doing the job? Be aware that we can't answer this without mor information. I commute year-round in Minnesota and we have condition close to yours. Here are my thoughts and experience with dyno hubs: I tried a dyno hub because I wanted what I thought was simplicity but when I executed the ...


3

Pedal power can be a roller that goes against the wheel a dynamo in the hub. The power generators against the wheel are not very efficient and I do NOT recommend them. A dynamo in the hub is efficient but it is not cheap and requires a new wheel or a rebuild of an existing wheel. A decent dynamo with lights is going to be over $100 and closer to $200. ...


4

You can get lights that are powered by a dynamo (generator) in the front hub. Combined with bright LED front and rear lights you get excellent visibility (both seeing and being seen) and very little maintenance. The downside is that the equipment is not inexpensive – figure you'll need to spend at least $250 US for a front wheel, headlight and taillight. My ...


2

Bicycles do have dynamo powered lights, which are pedal powered. They used to have a small generator that was rotated by the tyre. But this has been replaced by 'dynanmo hubs', with the generator being attached to the wheel hub. This basically means getting a wheel buildt around the hub or buying a wheel which has this type of hub, which would be fairly ...


6

Many or most other cyclists don't stop: but, other cyclists can get into 'accidents'. One advice, if there's a car or bike behind me then I use a hand signal (in lieu of a brake light) to indicate that I am about to slow to a stop. Unusually once on my commuting route (in Toronto), there was some bicycle police (who were giving traffic tickets to any ...


2

Wth the childs's legs sticking forward the way the website suggests, you've got no hope. You could easily check this by fitting the seat and trying to ride without the child -- that way you don't even need to do the clamps up tight. You're also likely to find that the slumped-foward head rest sticks into your lower back and means that you're badly ...


3

If you don't want to break the law... stop. If you want people driving cars and trucks to respect you... stop. If you don't want to risk a minor mistake of attention getting a cyclist killed... stop. If you are riding your bicycle to get exercise... stop. Just because you are pedaling your ass somewhere does not give you the right to run stop signs. Just ...


25

When it comes to stop signs, I live by some simple rules: If it's a multi-way stop and there's another car waiting or just arriving, I stop. If I can't clearly see or judge what I'm riding into, I stop. If it doesn't feel right for some reason, I stop. If there's a cop there (or a history of cops), I stop. I don't necessarily clip out and put my foot ...


8

Stop. Or at least slow down a lot, so that you look like you're taking care. Such signs are not really cyclist friendly. But if you don't take any notice of them then it reinforces the negative view many of the motor vehicle drivers have of us. Also, police officers generally have some discretion. It's only if they're bored or what you do is particularly ...


15

I'm not sure why you think it puts you in danger. My rule of thumb is that I will only do the Idaho stop when I can see all the roads at an intersection far enough to know that a car won't show up before I get through the intersection and I can't see any cars. I've been riding in the East Bay for 15+ years and I've never felt like my stopping at stop ...


0

A lot of motorcycle racers use lady's panty-liner pads on their foreheads to minimize sweat dripping down. It could work with a bicycle helmet, too. The helmet pads are otherwise almost the same cheap fabric they use for headliners in cars. Buy a few Velcro dots and make your own replacements, or a generic pad set from China for $2.69 on eBay. The pads ...


0

One reason is that in many places the law requires motorcycle helmets to be full-face. On a bicycle in most locations helmets are not required and the choice is yours. I ride with a half-head helmet in temperatures up to 95°F and never find ventilation is an issue at all. I can't believe the extra protection of my mouth and chin would suddenly change that.


2

1. Motion (not intention) Watch intensely the motion of a suspect vehicle, and consider it over anything else you think it's driver might do. When I see a vehicle threatening to cross my path, where time permits I'll seek to make eye-contact with the driver as outlined below, but penultimately the only thing to trust is it's actual movement... The front ...


0

The bike you seeks is probably not available off-the-shelf new from a bike shop. Your best bet is to find the bike you like with a coaster brake. Make sure that a) the rear rim is "hand-brake" compatible (chances are it will be rim brake compatible I have never seen a coaster brake hub with disc mounts!) and b) the frame and fork have mounts/posts for ...


-2

Finding a mix of step brake and hand is not going to be easy You may want to consider disc brakes. They have more power and are WAY less effected by rain. By old fashioned women do you mean step through? disc with set through


0

They are still made! Try a search for "bicycle coaster brake." You can narrow it to a "woman's" frame by adding "mixte" or "step through" or "woman's" to the key words. If you want gears add "3-speed" or "internally geared." Those searches will get you quite a range of bikes – from retro beach cruisers to very modern urban bikes. Once you find some that ...


2

The fenders on my MTB is made from plastic similar to those used in scuba fins, so they are fairly flexible, so when something does jam, they bend slightly and bend back. When I first installed them, I installed them very close to the wheel (<1cm), after some very muddy terrain, a couple of small rocks came through the front fender and front wheel ...


1

Do you live in a region with efficient and non-corrupt police? Then it might be useful to get advice from them, and report the incidents to them. The police can sometimes act even if there has not been an actual collision. From your description, it seems that you think that driver behaviour is the problem, not your own skills. You should of course check if ...


2

In many cities, doing a 35 km (22 mi) commute will take you through parts of the city with different socioeconomic levels and different driver behaviors. Cyclist behavior that works well in one part of the city can lead to road rage in another place. It's valuable to recognize this and adapt your approach at different parts of your commute. Some years ago, ...


0

If you often have people coming at you from the side, you need to make yourself more visible from the side. Many front and back lights don't actually illuminate much to the side. To make yourself more visible, especially at night, add reflectors to your bike. You can go for the basic wheel reflectors, and you can also put white reflective tape along your ...


0

I appreciate the attitude towards the people driving around in a climate killing, lansdscape scarring murderweapon you display just in your subject but my first suggestion would be to soften your stance a bit, and take the opposing point of view. These people are likely not out to kill you. They are just not used to small, climatefriendly fitnessmachines on ...


4

It seems like it could be: Loose Hub Loose Headset Untrue Wheel Tire messed up one way or another From your description, it's hard to believe that the source is in the rear half of the bike (I'm assuming it also happens when you're not pedaling, correct me if I'm wrong). It seems to be a fairly minor problem (for now at least), that could be very hard ...


3

I believe the main accident risk is that something gets caught between fender and wheel and blocks the wheel. If this happens with the front wheel, a crash is quite likely. This can happen in two ways: Some foreign object (branch, clump of earth etc.) gets caught and blocks the wheel. Some foreign object gets caught and causes the fender itself to fold ...


2

Another problem, if you're cycling in slushy snow, is that ice/snow can build up on the inside of the fender, and eventually interfere with the tire - especially if the wheel isn't perfectly round.


2

I have two theories that might explain the wobble you're experiencing. Perhaps both have their part in it. Self stabilizing of the front-wheel (resonance) Usually bikes are built in a way that stabilizes the front-wheel. The term for it is trail (called "Nachlauf" in the image). It's the horizontal distance between the steering axis and the wheel's axis. ...


11

First, if you're using a conventional cantilever brake (i.e. with a yoke, not a link wire), you need a fender or reflector or something to avoid the yoke catching on the tire. As usual, Sheldon is excellent. There are several types of fenders: Downtube mudguards: Seatpost fenders: Both of these options sit away from the wheel, clipped on. They can't ...


1

I switched my badboy 2 to schwalbe marathon plus tires to get just a bit of tread for extra grip in wet conditions (and extra leak-proof ness! Not unimportant in a bike for daily use!). There is always some grit or dirt on the road and in the wet some tread just gets you a bit more grip in those cases.


1

You only need tread on soft surfaces like mud, snow or gravel where the tire can sink into and interlock with the ground. Low tire pressure helps for the same reason, because the tire can cling to the ground and runs smoother. Unless you have really rough tarmac where some kind of interlocking can happen, a slick, high pressure 23mm tire will have as much ...


2

Bikes don't have enough speed / surface area to hydroplane. A slick does as good as tread in the rain.



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