New answers tagged

4

Yes - visibility is everything for both the rider and the surrounding things. Here's an example of a road bike in traffic. The effect is exaggerated because camera is on handlebars, but even at head height I didn't see her till the camera did. You can see my body position by the shadow on the left side. Its New Zealand ...


4

Being seen - the higher you are, the more likely you will be seen over a roof top. Clearly some cars are too high or too low for it to make a difference, but the odd car is at a height the difference might be significant. Seeing - in an aero position, its harder to see as much as in an upright. It can be done by actively looking around, but its harder - ...


0

I commute on clipless for the suburban/commuter belt section of my commute. When I get off the train and ride in city traffic I'm on platforms, so I have a foot almost literally in both camps. Where I don't ride clipless, it's less than 2km on the bike, with 6 sets of traffic lights. But platform pedals are not created equally and your shoes matter too. ...


9

There is a lot of discussion about this topic (i.e. a lot of anecdotes) because pedals are a very personal matter (cf. LondonCyclist or Zach Gallardo). However, I think that you're over-thinking this in some way: The "safest" pedal is the pedal you're most used to and comfortable with. Consider, for example, a hypothetical case where clipless pedals have ...


3

First congratulations for getting back on a bike. As others have stated the typical weak point will be the axles and wheels. I would recommend having the wheel bearings serviced by your local bike shop. Ask them to check the spoke tension as well. I've seen quite a few low end wheels with poorly adjusted bearings and almost no grease in the hub. I would then ...


4

The markings on the tires for the pressures can be essentially ignored. They're a combination of marketing and legal departments coming up with essentially arbitrary numbers. Find a set of pressures that works for you so the tires are properly inflated -- it should prevent pinch flats, but keep rolling resistance low and absorb road hazards and ...


1

Within "normal" standards of long and high angle, yes it is safe. While there are some stems which use clamping styles which are not carbon safe, or other restrictions, these are usually clearly stated. No restrictions are based on length or angle of the stem, that I am aware of. I have been a certified professional bicycle mechanic for 20 years, so I ...


4

Print out the relevant part of your links, and carry them with you cleanly, so that you can pull them out presentably the next time it happens (but clearly state what you're about to do, in case cop thinks you're getting a weapon out of your bag.) Politely show him/her the relevant part, and talk nicely about the implications. If cop wants to be all ...


38

There is no one size fits all answer to this, except the first point below. When dealing with police, or other authority figures, always behave respectfully. Contact the people responsible for sweeping the road and ask when or if they are going to do it next. Maybe they only sweep when requested. Find out if there's a local bike advocacy group. They ...


8

Are you asking about the immediate effects while high or long-term effects? I can't find any unbiased, well-cited sources except for one from the British Journal of Sports Medicine which basically says that doctors should try to keep athletes from using cannabis due to its possible dangers. However, some sources (of unknown quality) claim that it may help ...


0

Personally, I wouldn't ride a bike with any glasses which have metallic frame (especially without flexible grips) and real glass lenses because of their weight and potentially sharp edges. I've seen a friend of mine who got pretty deep cuts on his nose after falling from a bike (wearing his expensive and heavy Police sunglasses which tore skin from his ...


5

I have had my glasses damaged when falling off/getting hit on my bicycle, even with a helmet. Since my lenses are polycarbonate, they tend to just bounce on the road if they do come out of the frame. I'd think in some of those hits that my glasses would have broken if they were made from glass (especially when my glasses have hit the curb or rocks). Based ...


0

As a blind mole cyclist who has worn glasses for 30+ years, I'm more scared of dropping my glasses and smashing them on the ground. Without my prescription glasses, I can walk but I certainly can't ride or drive safely. However my helmet is always worn properly, so it provides a shelf of protection out from the forehead. I've had two significant ...


2

I personally don't think it is something to stress over. Most times glasses will break at the frame before the actual lens shatters. More than likely you will break a lens free of the frame rather than shattering it in the frame. If there is an impact centered on the lens strong enough to shatter it, more than likely your eye would be harmed either way. ...


1

I think you are concerned with the 'rate of degradation'. I've designed sports helmets recently that use similar materials (EPS for example), but not for so long as to ascertain all aspects of durability. Your biggest concern would be loss in mechanical strength on photodegradation. The rate of change in the mechanical integrity of expanded polystyrene ...


1

A motorcycle helmet will be too hot and heavy for cycling. Spend $20 USD and get a cheap bicycle helmet - you'll be a lot more comfortable and happy.


4

Coming back 6 months after I posted this question, I'm happy to report that there has been an enormous reduction in hazardous driver behaviour, and it all changed the day I installed a 20W LED headlight. It was $10 on ebay. Best insurance ever, every rider should have one. Previously I was using a USB rechargeable strap on one (moon mask) - but it just ...



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