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0

If you want to be safe from rear collision then you shouldn't mind a bit of lost time/speed or minor damage to your bike. So you will want a turn onto the sidewalk if you have a second or 2 then veer away from the curb and then turn back to get an as big angle as possible for the curb. You can use the handlebars to pull your front-wheel up the curb and when ...


5

The "trick" you're looking for is a side hop. It's really a variation on a bunny hop. Basically, you perform a standard bunny hop but when the handlebars and front wheel reach their zenith, you pull the front end over the obstacle while pushing them forward. The forward motion pulls the rear wheel up, as with a standard bunny hop. However, you additionally ...


0

When I was younger I was able to do it by jumping up with the front wheel, and then letting the back wheel "slide" diagonally whilst going further in with the front wheel. This made the angle of approach increase and eventually it would climb up when about 45 degrees or so. I suppose that it is not good for the health of the tire/wheel, but it worked and did ...


7

Short answer: yes, there is a way to do it. I fully support Mσᶎ's answer and have more to say than will fit in comments. Firstly, regarding the original premise. You happen to look over your shoulder (or in your mirror) and see a vehicle approaching from behind, either fully in the bike lane, or close enough that they can't safely pass. If I'm riding ...


1

First how is the bike set up? 25mm tires versus 32m (or bigger) is different. Clip versus clip-less is confusing. Are you snapped in like a SPD? There are a few hops Straight hop Pretty much need to be snapped in then lower you body and jump and pull up on pedals and bars. This is great for hopping up curbs but you need to be pointed at the curb. And ...


0

The easy part being the initial front wheel clearance of the curb. If you can then turn your front wheel further into the sidewalk as you land it and unweight the back of the bike, (easier still if you are clipped in, as you can pull the back up with your legs), the effect is almost that of hopping the kerb at an less than 90 degree angle. Occasionally the ...


17

You're talking about a "bunny hop" and it can be done at speed on a loaded bike but it's high risk. You'd almost certainly be better off jumping off the bike and rolling. US Bike Trials call it a "side hop", but in anglonesia I've mostly heard it called a bunny hop. Here's a photo of the 2006 Cycle Messenger World Champion doing more or less that at about ...


0

Regarding "could cause damage to my knees/body if I continue to do this without losing weight or increasing power". For a given grade and a given gear (34f 30r) increasing power will not reduce the stress on your knee. To go faster (higher cadence - more power) in gear X and hill Y you need to push harder. The only thing that is going to reduce pedal ...


1

Low cadences are generally putting a lot more strain on the knees, as you're relying on power, given the gear ratios I suspect another issue. I would work on your fitness on flatter terrain and build up to hills. Start within your cardio range and stay in it, do this regularly 3-4 times per week if possible. The problem stems from fitness/strength which ...


2

Understand that the concern is not generally things like a muscle or tendon tear that can occur with, eg, extreme weightlifting -- off-road bikers might be susceptible to that sort of injury, but not a road biker. Rather, the concern is the injury that may be done to joint surfaces and structures due to repeated force, above some "tolerable" level, applied ...


2

Your options to reduce the force on your knees are to reduce bike + rider weight or get lower gearing. If you have a standard road bike cassette, there are climbing cassettes that will reduce the gearing slightly (around 10% or so). Is it dangerous to your knees? Well, that depends on your personal physiology, how much force you are pushing, how much to you ...


6

Mountain bikers regularly run these low cadences for very short periods, often at much higher power output. The issue as to causing damage to knees is more about the duration of the climb and how strong your stabiliser muscles are. (Too much time mushing causes chronic overuse problems, while weak stabiliser muscles can allow injury to happen), however they ...


9

"Women's" helmet is a pure marketing feature. All helmets have to pass the same safety standards and if it fits wear it. Most helmet models come in at least 2 or 3 sizes. You should be able to find a helmet in the size that fits your head diameter. All the major manufacturers make helmets for every head size from 2 year olds to XL for adults. Every helmet ...


1

Many helmets are offered in various sizes. Often the cheaper helmets will only come in one size. This is an example of a helmet offered in 3 sizes Bell Lumen. Many of the helmets also offers an adjustable band. A mountain bike helmet should work fine for commuting.


0

I think a treaded tire would cut through mud on asphalt better than slicks. A total slick with no biting edges on so is less likely to grip on the surface because it is smooth having less friction. Tread gives somewhere for mud to go, kind of like in safety shoes where the water is squeezed out between the grooves. Likewise the mud is pushed between the ...


7

If you are riding on the road, you don't need treads. Even with mud. Even with sand, or gravel. Unless you are riding on the street in the middle of a volcanic mudslide or torrential rain washing out the road, it won't matter. The curved cross section of your tires coupled with your mass will instantly cut right through any patches of water or mud as you ...


3

But there is not one traction If you have surface that does not slip like asphalt or cement then you want maximum contact. A slick. That is why Nascar does it. If you have a surface that does slip like gravel or dirt then you want a tire that grabs. Tread or knobs. Mud is whole different beast. Water has basically no traction. Hydroplane is a ...


8

One of the reviews has something interesting to say These 27" and 26" tires are made to fit older 10 speed/english racer type bikes. You should remember that the 26"x1-3/8" size predates the MTB era by at least three decades, they came first. If you have an old Raleigh three speed or a 1970s Peugeot then these are the tires you need in the ...


7

It sounds as though your problem was a somewhat loose tyre not properly seated. It may have been loose enough that it couldn't be properly seated, but in that case I'd expect it to pop off and the tube explode while you were pumping it up for the first time. You may also be running the tyres at too low a pressure, with a skinny tyre like that I'd expect them ...


1

As Batman has commented, I suspect getting the data down to this level is probably going to be quite hard. That said there is some Australian research which may be of interest to you. In particular a study undertaken in South Australia which looked at the circumstances surrounding crash involvement for a group of 61 bicycle riders involved in a collision ...



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