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8

For a one-off ride in the salt like that, you should be fine for now if you lube the chain and wipe it down. Give the bike a good washing whenever the weather warms up enough to turn on the outside spigot. In my experience of riding through road salt (and grit, which is probably just as bad) on a regular basis, the bike tends to need a new chain every ...


7

You can use water to remove the salt if it's bad enough, but immediately wipe off the water and generously re-lubricate the chain. You do not want to let the chain sit around with the salty water on it, as it will readily rust. So if you use water, just make sure the chain is completely dry afterwards, then re-oil it. Metal doesn't really get porous, but ...


6

One option would be to use a cheap chain during winter and discard it in spring. Another would be to not have the chain be salted in the first place, try a hermetic chain guard system. If your bike doesnt have a dereailleur, you could try a chainrunner, but I have my doubts it protects against water getting into the lining. ...


6

Bike chains come in two sizes, 1/8inch (aka BMX chain) and 3/32inch (aka 9 speed chain). 1/8inch chains are designed for single speed or internal hub geared bicycles and the chain is designed in such a way that it can not be derailed from the sprocket. A 3/32inch chain is designed for a derailleur geared bicycle and is designed to ease shifting from one ...


6

Road salt is pretty bad for your bike, and I would recommend cleaning it as often and as thoroughly as you can. It's my understanding that snow and ice can cause rust on steel frames, so you'll want to get those off as well. On an aluminum frame, I'd be concerned with the paint -- and with screws & bolts (usually made of steel). I've never had a bike ...


4

I've had a couple of non-folding mountain bikes on a sailboat for 5 years. I opted for smaller frame non-folding bikes for performance, and there is a hatch they barely fit through. Of course, rust is the major problem. Banging around in the waves and in the process of storing them is a potential problem. Because of this, there are no drink holders, ...


4

If you go over to Bikeforums, and look in the "mechanics" section for chain-lube threads, you'll note that they go on and on and on and get downright cranky... People with their own home-concocted recipies, folks favoring waxes over oils, folks who use magic spells.. (well, not really but you get the idea) It's a quandary. The ideal chain lube would go on ...


4

Unfortunately, there isn't a substitute for simply keeping a bike clean. Even on a multi-day ride, it's possible to bring along a rag and a bottle of lube, at least getting off the worst of the salt and dirt before adding lube. Some bike shops sell small packets of lube, but those are getting harder to find. Cooking oil is not designed to lubricate metal, ...


3

Salt could be very dangerous. If you own a car, you should already know that. Your chain and probably other parts of drivetrain will need replacement in spring, if you ride your bike in winter. If salt gets inside your suspension, it can do bad things to it. Ride a cheap bike in winter.


3

Steel will rust, given time. Riding a nice bike on salty roads will scratch it up, but you can minimize that. Frame exterior: Wiping a steel bike down with a greasy rag as a preventative measure certainly won't hurt, and it may help (particularly if you already have any scratches in the paint). I think you'd be better off concentrating on cleaning it ...


2

If @ Daniel R Hicks suggestion doesn't work you might need some more intense maintainence. Remove the brake cables from the calipers. Then remove the brakes from the bike, disassemble them completely. Clean all the salt and corrosion from the shaft and the pivot holes of the brake arms. Lightly lube the pivot points and shaft (I am partial to white grease) ...


2

Maybe you can find some folding bike with belt-drive instead of chain-drive. This would remove the most "rust forming" element of the bike. Also, hydraulic brakes, be them disc or rim brakes, eliminate the hardening inside the brake cables, which sometimes is annoying. And, if you are not willing to spend much, a bit of simple extra care, taken just a bit ...


2

Rust is a valid concern, but there are certainly ways you can deal with it. And aluminum-framed bike will not rust like a steel one. If you do have a steel-framed bike, investing in a product such as Frame Saver certainly makes a lot of sense. I would be sure to keep your drivetrain well-lubricated, as well. The final concern would be assorted nuts and ...


1

The best option for protecting a bike chain from the elements is a fully enclosed chain guard. Here's one at work on my bakfiets: This works so well, I intentionally choose this bike to ride on rainy or snowy, slushy days. I've had our bakfiets about 4 years now, and have only oiled the chain once that I recall, when the chaincase happened to be removed ...


1

Salt is bad, but please mind that washing salt off with a waterhose is also bad. Rain doesn't get into your bearings and chain, while water from a waterhose sometimes does get in nasty places. Remove salt with some cleaner and some old cloth. Grease your chain again with thin oil. And grease all metal parts (bolts and stuff) with some thick grease such as ...



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