Hot answers tagged

10

Yes. However, it varies by type of riding and conditions. All Mountain is probably the extreme example of this (and the main market for dropper seatposts). All Mountain bikes are designed to be able to climb and for that generally one would want the seat in a "high" position to be efficient. During a technical descent, however, the seat is generally ...


9

Most seat posts have a "minimum" insert of 3 to 4 inches. But this varies with the material and the thickness of the post, and the weight of the rider means the minimum might still be too little. As a tall rider I frequently have my seatposts up to maximum, and have bent several over time, and have fractured one frame. Now I always buy a 450 mm or 500 mm ...


7

For road bikes of that age, showing just "a fistful of seat post" was considered good frame fit and style. Otherwise the frame was likely too small for the rider. Of course that was before the advent of sloping top tubes. If the bottom bracket is not too high, stand over height of the top tube should be no problem even with such small seat post extension.


6

This article, The Four and a Half Rules of Road Saddles, from Cervélo Cycles has been real helpful to me in think about saddles. I think the key points are: The saddle needs to be wide enough to support you "sit bones" but not so wide that it chafes on your thighs. The saddle has to be flat enough that the part between your sit bones doesn't press up on ...


6

I had an exactly same problem: Ritchey WCS seatpost, Merida frame (both alu alloy) and a lightweight clamp, like in @Frisbee's answer. What I tried: Beefy clamp with various torque settings. Didn't help at all. PVC tape. Helped, but didn't last long. More torque on a lightweight clamp. I snapped it in half with only 6Nm. Hair spray. To my surprise, it ...


6

Yes, there is. If you spend a lot of time standing on the pedals and not using the saddle then you will probably want the saddle to be low so that it doesn't get in your way. If you spend a lot of time pedalling hard or fast when sitting down you are more likely to want the seatpost high so you can pedal efficiently from that position - probably high ...


6

The manufacturer of the seat post would have really answered this with the minimum mark. You should really maintain at least the same length within the frame. Aside from stability, if the seat post is too short, then you risk damaging the frame of the bike, because there is a higher force within the frame due to the same torque being required, but at a ...


5

There are a lot of more potentially useful avenues to investigate first, because you feel that chamois pad quality is not the culprit next most obvious choice is the saddle: Stock saddles are often not very high quality. They are also typically too soft (aka not supportive) which will cause problems on longer longer rides. Adding to this, if you still ...


5

I am a daily commuter and I have been riding (mainly) road bikes on the road for over 40 years. Comfort is important to me and more so as I spend longer periods in the saddle. A setup that suits another, may not suit you and vice versa however, there is plenty of information on settings to get you into the ballpark. Improvement requires a bit of ...


5

It depends on the frame material what effect the water inside the frame will have. A lot of frames have a small hole drilled at the bottom of the bottom bracket casing. If there is no hole there you can drill one yourself. I have done this on aluminium frames before and it is very easy. Use a 4mm drill bit and drill through till you cut into the bottom ...


3

After trying a chunkier clamp and hairspray, I found this Clamp did not help much, the hairspray was better, but I was a little concerned about the solvent stuff in the aerosol. The Liquid Torque has been applied and I have done over 120 miles since, with not even a millimetre of slippage! Thanks for the other answers ...


3

With a high bottom bracket the ideal seat post may be impractically high in certain situations. Depending on your preferred foot for putting down and the typical camber the bike may have to lean more than you'd like if you sit in a ready-to-go position at traffic lights. The biggest example for me though is with a toddler seat on the back. That's a lot of ...


3

Answer: This is what can happen. Please check my question at What caused this seat clamp / frame failure? This was caused by a really long seat post installed way too far up. http://i.stack.imgur.com/1CiVW.jpg I also have a bad habit of bending seat posts at the point they enter the frame, mostly due to the leverage from being so long.


3

1) It's for show, just like the carbon fiber insert on my Leatherman Skeletool CX. See this question. 2) It's fine for touring provided its in good condition. However, you may still want to get a different seatpost depending on the adjustments available on this one.


2

Who says its the original seat post? (It likely isn't.) There are maximum amounts of insertion (determined by the frame; there may be things inside the frame or weird shaped tubes) and minimum lengths of insertion (determined by the seat post; if its not inserted enough, you can damage the seat tube or worse) -- it is unlikely, but someone may have needed ...


2

I just installed my own 2016 Giant Contact SL Switch dropper post in the internal cable routing mode this week. The simple answer is you would be best advised to just remove the seat itself by undoing the clamp bolts with the appropriate hex wrench, leaving the post itself installed in the frame. If that solution does not sufice, then opt for external ...


2

Almost all seats and seat posts use a standard width and size rail. Unless you have a very high end setup, it will be compatible. Since the one that you described didn't fit, I agree with the previous posters that the LBS has got it wrong somehow. Note that padding is not the only way to reduce saddle pain: getting a saddle that fits is much more ...


2

How would I search for something like this on amazon or elsewhere? rear light aero seatpost This works on Amazon and elsewhere.


2

As long it secures the seatpost I don't see how a screw instead of bolt can damage the bike. If it fails, the worst case would be a seat sliding down. You might find it inconvient if screw has head that requires tools not usually used for bicycles, like phillips screwdriver or a hex head. New seatpost collars are cheap, so you can buy a replacement to feel ...


2

As bhell already mentioned, seat posts on older bikes (or those with straight top tubes) tend to be shorter in relation to newer bikes "designed" for the same body measurements. The reason for this is explained well by Sheldon Brown: On the other hand, why shouldn't you ride a "too small" bike? "Because the seat and handlebars will be too low!" That ...


2

Aww man I'm jealous - can you please add a side-photo of the whole bike? 70's tandems were renouned for being quite short, and most of the length is lost in the stoker's area. Mine's a 80's model and one of the touted features is "2 inches more stoker room!" So if you want the full 70's look, embrace the aero advantage of being so close. And don't ...


1

It depends on the grade, material, and the threading of the fastener you found. You'll want fine (a.k.a. machine) pitch threads and Stainless Steel for the material (otherwise it'll rust and sieze) The collars are usually Aluminum and there is a galvanic corrosion that'll take place unless you use a lot of grease or some blue loctite (formula 242, or ...


1

If you prefer the cushion of the seat post, you could request a new one, especially if it keeps coming apart. It should be covered under the warranty. If you don't care about the spring support, a simple seat post will be more sturdy.


1

Or you can go smaller and shim it up with aluminum cans. EDIT: I removed the suggestion to get a 27.2 and remove .2 mm of material.


1

I'd consider finding two seats and posts, one each. Put a clamp or block around the pole so you cn simply drop it into the bike and it will be the right height for that rider. Still need to do up the QR to hold it though.


1

A fast look at bikecomponents. Look at the SUSPENSION SEATPOST section.


1

I would suggest any site like Amazon, EBay, or craigslist even. I just skimmed through and Amazon, as well as EBay have a good assortment of seat posts in that size. If you want an actual bike shop website, try using Wiggle. It is something of a surplus store, so they have a pretty decent selection at decent prices. Your seat post size seems to be fairly ...


1

Many of these answers are valid, but before you go through the trouble of heating your frame, using nasty chemicals, or anything else, there is a far simpler method that often does the trick. Get a dumpy saddle you don't mind bending and install it in the seat post. Clamp the saddle in a bench top vice. Using the entire bike frame as a lever, turn the ...



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