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8

Most seat posts have a "minimum" insert of 3 to 4 inches. But this varies with the material and the thickness of the post, and the weight of the rider means the minimum might still be too little. As a tall rider I frequently have my seatposts up to maximum, and have bent several over time, and have fractured one frame. Now I always buy a 450 mm or 500 mm ...


6

This article, The Four and a Half Rules of Road Saddles, from Cervélo Cycles has been real helpful to me in think about saddles. I think the key points are: The saddle needs to be wide enough to support you "sit bones" but not so wide that it chafes on your thighs. The saddle has to be flat enough that the part between your sit bones doesn't press up on ...


6

The manufacturer of the seat post would have really answered this with the minimum mark. You should really maintain at least the same length within the frame. Aside from stability, if the seat post is too short, then you risk damaging the frame of the bike, because there is a higher force within the frame due to the same torque being required, but at a ...


4

For road bikes of that age, showing just "a fistful of seat post" was considered good frame fit and style. Otherwise the frame was likely too small for the rider. Of course that was before the advent of sloping top tubes. If the bottom bracket is not too high, stand over height of the top tube should be no problem even with such small seat post extension.


3

Answer: This is what can happen. Please check my question at What caused this seat clamp / frame failure? This was caused by a really long seat post installed way too far up. http://i.stack.imgur.com/1CiVW.jpg I also have a bad habit of bending seat posts at the point they enter the frame, mostly due to the leverage from being so long.


3

1) It's for show, just like the carbon fiber insert on my Leatherman Skeletool CX. See this question. 2) It's fine for touring provided its in good condition. However, you may still want to get a different seatpost depending on the adjustments available on this one.


3

On carbon frames I've used, they have had a single bolt clamp like this one, so it should be fine. Personally, I'd like to use a slightly bigger clamp and one of those rubber size-decreasing rings to avoid cracking the frame. If in doubt I'd phone up the manufacturer of the frame and ask!


3

Old thread.. But here's how I fixed it on my bike... Cut an old inner tube into strips that wrap around the rails. Wrap them around the rails and tighten down. It should last virtually forever this way and won't damage the rails like sandpaper will. It might also slightly lower vibrations in your seat.


3

Definitely alloy drink can or other thin sheet metal as it is not compressible and is not affected by water, oil or grease.


2

Sheldon Brown has a thorough article about stuck seat posts. http://sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html Thick soled shoes might also work, if the saddle isn't that much too high.


2

I had a Peugeot bike once where the seatpost didn't have the usual clamp but a similar system to hold it in the seat-tube. The system was not very practical because if you wanted to adjust the saddle height you could only do so if the saddle was removed. The bolt was tightened from the top of the seatpost. There was a second draw-back: the seat-tube being ...


2

you can try to use caustic soda. It will melt down the aluminum. But you have to be very careful. Watch this video


2

Almost all seats and seat posts use a standard width and size rail. Unless you have a very high end setup, it will be compatible. Since the one that you described didn't fit, I agree with the previous posters that the LBS has got it wrong somehow. Note that padding is not the only way to reduce saddle pain: getting a saddle that fits is much more ...


2

I just installed my own 2016 Giant Contact SL Switch dropper post in the internal cable routing mode this week. The simple answer is you would be best advised to just remove the seat itself by undoing the clamp bolts with the appropriate hex wrench, leaving the post itself installed in the frame. If that solution does not sufice, then opt for external ...


2

How would I search for something like this on amazon or elsewhere? rear light aero seatpost This works on Amazon and elsewhere.


2

As long it secures the seatpost I don't see how a screw instead of bolt can damage the bike. If it fails, the worst case would be a seat sliding down. You might find it inconvient if screw has head that requires tools not usually used for bicycles, like phillips screwdriver or a hex head. New seatpost collars are cheap, so you can buy a replacement to feel ...


1

If you prefer the cushion of the seat post, you could request a new one, especially if it keeps coming apart. It should be covered under the warranty. If you don't care about the spring support, a simple seat post will be more sturdy.


1

Or you can go smaller and shim it up with aluminum cans. EDIT: I removed the suggestion to get a 27.2 and remove .2 mm of material.


1

I'd consider finding two seats and posts, one each. Put a clamp or block around the pole so you cn simply drop it into the bike and it will be the right height for that rider. Still need to do up the QR to hold it though.


1

A fast look at bikecomponents. Look at the SUSPENSION SEATPOST section.


1

I would suggest any site like Amazon, EBay, or craigslist even. I just skimmed through and Amazon, as well as EBay have a good assortment of seat posts in that size. If you want an actual bike shop website, try using Wiggle. It is something of a surplus store, so they have a pretty decent selection at decent prices. Your seat post size seems to be fairly ...


1

Many of these answers are valid, but before you go through the trouble of heating your frame, using nasty chemicals, or anything else, there is a far simpler method that often does the trick. Get a dumpy saddle you don't mind bending and install it in the seat post. Clamp the saddle in a bench top vice. Using the entire bike frame as a lever, turn the ...


1

Noone's mentioned heat to enlarge the steel frame. First, check with a magnet to make sure the frame is steel. If its an aluminium frame, then stop now. Remove the bottom bracket and bearings first. And remove the seat. Also remove brake cables from the area of the seat clamp. Drill a good sized hole through the top of the seat pole, and fit a lever ...


1

Leaving out the back story - which is emotional - here is how I got an alloy seatpost out of a Columbus SLX (steel) frame. I got a bunch of optimistic advice and it all failed me. I tried: Penetrating oil such as WD-40, Hard core penetrators like PBlaster and Kroil, Freeze spray, Hammers, and giant levers. I was down to the last resort - sodium ...


1

I swear by the seats that have a hole in the center. Terry was the original but now other manufacturers make them as well. I have used them for years. Even with tons of gel the fragile parts are still going to be in direct contact with the seat and that hurts. If you do go that route, you'll have to adjust it a little here and there to make sure that it's ...


1

Who says its the original seat post? (It likely isn't.) There are maximum amounts of insertion (determined by the frame; there may be things inside the frame or weird shaped tubes) and minimum lengths of insertion (determined by the seat post; if its not inserted enough, you can damage the seat tube or worse) -- it is unlikely, but someone may have needed ...


1

Soda cans do the trick, cf this tuto


1

Decades of experimenting and I still am a sucker for the 'next great thing.' A few tidbits I do trust, now: Tiprep antiseize for every bike part that is tightly pressed/bolted infrequently, especially dissimilar metals where galvanic corrosion will occur; Ti's bad, but Alu to Alu or steel/Ti may be even worse. Greases are NOT antiseize, nor is it a ...


1

Yes, on my 1975 Peugeot UO18, the brakes are located on the intermediate stays and the seat stays are used for the rack mount. The brake configuration is visible here. (photo source: http://oldtenspeedgallery.com/owner-submitted/joans-1975-peugeot-mixte-uo-18/#.VWFRtmDDz88)


1

No. Based on your question and your comments, there is not a product that does what you are seeking (get your hips over the bottom bracket). The reason being that no one rides that far forward.1 The old style Profile is probably your best bet for getting forward: There are designs with a seat over the bottom bracket, even some that are made ...



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