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2

Yes, you can damage the frame if the seat post is too short. I have personally seen someone sit down on an overextended seatpost and fall off the bike as the seat post was wrenched out of the seat tube. The collar went flying and the top of his seat tube was mangled. His frame was titanium and he was able to bend it back. You probably wouldn't be able to ...


5

Pull the post and hold it next to the seat tube to see how far it goes in. If it does not go in far enough to be into the seat tube below the top tube you are putting a LOT of stress on the top of the seat tube. Believe that maximum mark on the seat post. A seat post is not that expensive to risk damaging a frame. This is just one (not cheap) seat post ...


2

Nearly. The diameter does need to match, but you also need to consider the materials -- metal needs grease, carbon fiber doesn't, so combining the materials in the frame and seatpost shouldn't be done. Also, note that different seat posts have different levels of adjustability - saddle angle and position, height (which connects to minimum/maximum insertion ...


0

As suggested in other answers your saddle angle may be key. I don't know what your experience with Brooks saddles has been, but the set up tends to differ a little from more modern saddles, especially if you wear modern cycling clothing. Brook saddles tend to work like a sling and depending on how well you have broken your saddle in and the tension you ...


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I know I'm late on this thread but try sliding your saddle backwards and not forwards. Likely too far forwards over your bottom bracket and is causing your pelvis to pull forwards. If you have your pelvis further back the pressure from just your pedaling alone will help to keep you seated further back on the saddle.



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