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24

In addition to locking your bike securely with a good lock, there are several strategies you can use: Location Where you lock up can be nearly as important as how well you're locked up. If you're in a public, well-lit area, a thief might think twice about stealing a bike. A rack in an isolated, dark area may look more attractive to steal -- there aren't ...


22

Some years ago, Bicycling magazine did a shootout on available locks and the Kryptonite "New York Chain" came out on top. Unfortunately, it weighs more than many bikes and is not easy to carry either. Fine if you can leave it where you lock your bike. I'm with the police department at a major university, and we have a program through Kryptonite where we ...


19

get the kryptonite fahgettaboutit - as small as possible. http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Fahgettaboutit-Bicycle-U-Lock-6-Inch/dp/B000OZ9VLU best lock out there, I don't think you could cut it with bolt cutters, you would need a hydraulic jack (the main reason to go for a smaller lock, so there is no room for the jack), or a disc grinder to get thru it.


18

Lock related Have a better lock than the bike next to yours. At the very least get a lock such as this one: http://www.bicycleworkshop.co.uk/products.php?plid=m2b1s93p186 they are relatively difficult to break and are easy to operate meaning you'll lock your bike as a matter of course. Don't use a cable lock. Bolt cutters snip them in like 5 seconds. ...


18

Try a floor or Wall anchor system, then lock the bike to that. http://lockitt.com/lockdown.htm


17

It is all subjective, but I would say that a public place is better (as I have previously answered to a similar question). Most bike thefts are opportunistic; unless you've got an especially desirable bike the theft is not about your bike, it's about stealing any bike. So the key is to reducing the opportunity to steal your bike: as you point out, ...


17

Bicycle Theft, Guide No. 52 (2008) gives details around bicycle theft in different variants, stages and from different perspectives, contains reference for theft data. From the report: Offenders Not all bicycles are stolen for financial gain. Some offenders may take a bicycle simply to get from one place to another, and then abandon it. Research ...


16

To avoid bike seat being nicked Take it with you (not always practical) Use a cable or chain to attach it to the bike frame. These are made commercially, but even a fairly token bit of wire rope works - the people who will cut that will generally also cut your lock. Get allen key skewers as opposed to quick release. This reduces the chances of theft, but ...


15

I would guess that hard evidence is going to be difficult to come by -- doing anything resembling a controlled experiment would be enormously expensive, and cyclists are too disorganized (by this I mean lacking unified organizational structure) to do some sort of sampling-based measurement or epidemiological study. I would just observe that, in my opinion, ...


12

A few years ago in Toronto, what was probably one of the biggest bike theft busts ever happened. Igor Kenk was trading drugs for stolen bikes, and stockpiling them by the thousands. (Supposedly he was planning to corner the market post-econopocalypse or post-ecopocalypse and be a king). Anyways, you can see pictures or the thousands of bikes that he stole: ...


10

There's no way to 100% secure everything, but there are things you can do to make it more difficult or time-consuming. Don't lock up your bike. Bring your bike with you instead of leaving it outside. Mine goes into my office. Choose a location where you or other people will see thieves messing with the bike. Not a super-high traffic area (in that case ...


10

In the end it might matter more WHO is around the rack (policemen, guards, janitors, public workers, parking lot workers, hot-dog stand owners, etc.) than HOW MANY people. I'd rather, when available, leave my bike under one lonely ever-present alert pair of eyes than in a crowd of anonymous passers-by.


9

A trick that couriers use around my area is to carry the key on a rubber band around their wrist - no more fumbling around in the pockets for a key. I find that a lock that you can wear across your chest like a bandolier is most convenient for carrying around. There are a number of chain locks around in this length that have a plastic tube over the chain to ...


9

For frequent use, I think it is hard to beat a lock that is built into the bike, e.g. the Axa Defender that is fixed to the fame of the bike and then locks the wheel; it also has a cable that you can use to lock the bike to the bake stand. It’s great for a lock on a “everyday” bike, as you can’t forget to take it with you.


9

Perhaps you might swap your current quick-release skewers by one of the many "anti-theft" alternatives (listed in my perceived order of security): Pitlock (www.pitlock.com): these require a special shaped key to open. You carry the keys with you, and no thief could take the wheel. Neither yourself if you lose the damn key; Velo Orange anti-theft skewers: a ...


8

It is hard to beat a “Sheffield” stand, as they make it easy to lock the bike and don’t bend your wheels if the bike is knocked over. Cambridge Cycling Campaign did a good write up on the options.


8

Pain in the ass, and waste of money. As of the last time I checked, you can't track them directly (there'd be no way for you to receive a signal from a battery-operated device 5mi away), so you need to sign up for a recurring monthly service. On top of that, they chew through battery pretty quickly, requiring a recharge every few days. Contrast that to ...


8

The first thing is to note that vibrant, brightly-colored objects are by nature more attention-getting, so I hope your bike is not bright red, light orange, yellow or bright green. I have noted that gray bikes are less noticeable and even hard to see in some conditions. Dark blue, dark gray, pale or dusty white, and brown are also favorable colors to make a ...


8

For quill stems, you can use a rubber cement to glue a ball-bearing into the socket on the stem bolt, making it so you can't get at it with an allen key. You'd obviously want to use a glue that can be removed with a solvent, so that you'd be able to do regular service.


8

I've seen videos showing people stealing bikes amidst a crowd of onlookers while no one intervenes. Locking in a crowded place isn't necessarily going to save your bike. On the other hand, lots of bikes are stolen from locked garages. I'm not aware of any statistics about what storage method is safer. I've never had a bike stolen, but from what I've heard ...


8

As for the Kryptonite, cutting one side an bending is certainly possible, but in reality if you can cut one side, you use the same tools to cut the other. The tools needed to bend the link after cutting one side are almost certainly not portable, and why would you carry two tools when one will do. In comparison to the D-lock - if you can cut though 18mm, ...


7

I've mounted lights with similar clamps on carbon forks with no ill effect (just have to be very careful not to over-tighten the clamp) but a lock -- which is heavy -- might put a too much torque on such a small clamp. Maybe if you could spread out the area over which the clamp attaches to the frame then it might be ok. What about attaching the U-lock ...


7

If you use a U-lock, you can use Sheldon Brown's lock strategy to lock at least your rear wheel along with the frame. This is the approach I use. Remember: the shorter the U-lock, the safer you are. For your front wheel, you can bring along a second U-lock, a cable, or use pitlocks. For the saddle, simply switch away from a quick-release skewer to an ...


7

I've got this one. http://www.abus-bordo.com/html_en/bikelock_bordo_lite.html It's heavy, but very strong. Unlike U-locks, it is easy to carry on the bike. Update : video showing operation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57zc9kregqs&feature=related Pretty simple : unfold like an accordion, wrap around frame, front wheel, and some "urban furniture", ...


7

IANAL. Almost certainly no, for the same reasons that a parking deck owner is not liable for the theft of a car inside. Unless you can prove that the bicycle rack was installed improperly due to gross negligence, and the improper installation allowed the bicycle to be stolen even while locked properly, you would have no case whatsoever. Locking a bike ...


7

I think ABUS is one of the most respectable, perhaps THE most respectable bike-lock manufacturer around. They have even some numbered levels of protection, the higher the level the higher the protection, even agains powertools (because of special steel alloys, and such). They have some combination padlocks, which seem very interesting. Take a look at these ...


6

In France, a bike coding system exists. It consists of a unique engraved code and a central database indicating the owner of the coded bike and whether it has been stolen. This both makes the bike less attractive and easier to recover when stolen. Of course all the advices about locks are relevant even with this system.


6

I'd recommend kryptonite. The Evolution Mini is used by a number of my friends (messengers) and they use it many times in a day. Keeps things secure and it's small. If you want a bit more flexibility in what you can attach to then go for a larger sized one. https://www.kryptonitelock.com/products/list.aspx?cid=1001&scid=1000


6

I second the advice suggesting a small U-lock. Also, see Sheldon Brown's advice for locking strategy, which has done me well so far.


6

If you need to fit a large number of bikes into a small(ish) space, hanging them on the wall is usually the best option. The simplest and cheapest route is to mount hooks into the studs which will normally be at 16" centers. If you want different spacing you can mount a header like a 2x6 or 2x8 to the to the wall and attach the hooks to the header. We ...



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