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11

It's a bike sharing scheme in London, the "Boris" part comes from the mayor's name. Wikipedia article on Barclays Cycle Hire There's also a small Boris Bikes community forum (Photo credit)


9

Barcelona Barcelona has had a bike sharing program for about 3 years now, Bicing. Overall it's been a success with a huge amount of people signing up and using them every day. Things that didn't work: Bike stations weren't properly designed, it was easy to steal bikes. They have fixed this recently. The lever to secure the seat was too small and people ...


8

In Melbourne, we have a bike share scheme. You can buy helmets for $5 from various outlets and then return them for a refund of $3 (they are then cleaned and reused). Despite this, many people are saying that Australia's compulsory helmet laws are responsible for the lack of success of the bike sharing scheme.


8

Dublin There is a bike sharing scheme operating in Dublin and it works pretty well. The scheme launched on September 13th 2009, so less than year ago, and as for today more then 1 million journeys were made The uptake of people was way grater than initially predicted, to quote the wikipedia Approximately 1,000 people used the bicycles in the first ...


7

Montreal The city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada has had one for a while. I think that there has also been one in Europe. I saw a documentary on CBC's DocZone that had some info about these systems. I think that you should be able to watch it online


7

London London Cycle Hire Scheme: Much of the demand appears to come from commuters arriving at rail termini and avoiding the underground. Together with the journey home this causes major tidal problems. It seems as if this usage pattern is being supported (by using lorries to ferry bikes around). Limited placement of stands near tube and train stations. ...


6

This appears to be a widely-used, but unofficial way of communicating that the bike is broken and should not be ridden. See the Wired article that documents this trend: "Courteous Citi Bike Riders Are Alerting Others to Broken Rides" by Christina Boddington. Also, on Twitter, you can find numerous examples (many of which were cited in the Wired post).


6

Paris (and surrounding areas) In France, there is the Vélib' system operated by a private company with subsidies of the city. The same company operates the same system in many other cities: Lyon, Nantes, Toulouse, Marseille, Caen, Besançon, Nice and probably others that I am not aware. The main advantage of such systems is that the population of bikes on ...


6

Minneapolis, MN ...has a three-season bike share program called NiceRide, featuring lime green cruiser bikes available at stations around the city. The bikes are quite comfortable, and an annual membership is $60. The first "season" for NiceRide finished in November, here are some numbers from their end-of-season report Total trips: 100,817 1 ...


5

Vancouver, Canada Is supposed to be installing one this year, 3800 bikes and 250 stations according to their last report. But - cycle helmets are required here ($100 fine) and the scheme doesn't propose hiring them - so it's going to be limited to existing cyclists. General opinion is that the money and space would be better spent on secured parking for ...


5

I seriously doubt that it's due to the lack of shocks, unless you have some really bad roads there -- many people ride bikes great distances with no shocks, skinny, stiff tires, and no real springs in the seat. More likely your problem is with your posture -- seat too low, handlebar too low, handlebar too close or too far away, and/or pedals at the wrong ...


4

Brisbane, Australia Brisbane has a bike hire service called CityCycle. CityCycle is an active and sustainable public transport option aimed at reducing traffic congestion and parking pressures in the inner city, as cars are replaced by cycle trips. The city has also built an 'end-of-trip facility' called King George Square Cycle Centre. 420 ...


4

Hangzhou, China The largest bicycle sharing system in the world. Hangzhou has 50,000 bikes at 2,050 stations around the city. People make an average of 240,000 trips a day on the bikes, which are completely integrated into the rest of the public transit system. By 2020, the plan is to have 175,000 bikes available for use. Source Bike sharing ...


4

A quick Google brought up This article. It shows a list of prices for bike sharing rates in 10 cities around the world. It shows prices for various lengths of time that you can rent/borrow the bike for. In most places, the first 30 minutes (sometimes 45 minutes) are free, if you pay for a small yearly membership.


3

All of the large cycle hire schemes offer several plans and for each, the cost of a ride depends on the length of the ride, as well as the number of rides during the period covered by the plan. Assuming 2 rides on 24 hour pass, some example plans stack up like this, for rides of up to 2 hours: Here and in subsequent figures, four systems are shown, ...


3

Washington, D.C. ...just started a bike share, and of course it has to be the largest in the US. I prefer to measure size by 'number of bikes being used per day/week/month' rather than 'number of bikes available in the system'. (Maybe there should be a per capita normalization, too.) At any rate, the Greater DC area is an excellent place to ride a bike. ...


2

Melbourne, Australia The system has yearly, weekly, and daily passes available. There are 50 stations available in the city, with a total of 600 bikes. Helmets are not supplied. This June 2010 video tells you more about the bikes, but in case it goes away: The bikes are heavy, they have step-through frames, and are very, very blue. Melbourne Bike Share


2

Portland, Oregon Incredibly, the city in the US that's often considered the friendliest to cyclists seems to have no bike-sharing system. There was an informal program in the 90's, the Yellow Bike program, but it was officially abandoned. (Although, maybe that's not the case?) In 2008, they seemed to have given up on it, but the city website is hopeful and ...


2

Boston, MA "Hubway" is the equivalent to London's Boris bike here in Boston. They just showed up on the city streets this summer. I was also very surprised with how much of a success they are considering how heavy and clunky they look. Boston has a respectable number of bike riders and I was shocked to see more people riding these than personal bikes the ...


2

Copenhagen, Denmark Another interesting bike sharing system. What's unique about this system is that the bikes are free to use. Copenhagen City Bikes or Bycykler København is the bicycle sharing system of Copenhagen, Denmark. Launched in 1995 with 1,000 cycles, the project was the world's first large-scale urban bike-sharing scheme. It features ...


2

New York City Named Citi Bike, this system started May 27, 2013, with about 300 stations and 6000 bikes in Manhattan and Brooklyn.


2

Madison, Wisconsin Madison B-Cycle http://madison.bcycle.com/ is a three-season (no winter; spring starts April 1) bike-sharing service, available on the Isthmus (downtown) and in a few outlying areas of west and south campus. The step-through, three-speed Trek bikes are equipped with dynamo head and taillight, front basket, and skirt guard. Anecdotally, ...


2

Vienna, Austria With excellent coverage of the old city center and linkage to an extensive bike trail network (on the sidewalks!), this system is well loved and well used, but it feels a bit worn down (the bikes are in terrible shape) and the system is old and cumbersome (not the excellent system now in use on London and Boston and soon to be deployed in ...


2

Many trailers attach via a hitch on the rear axle of the bicycle. Since bike share bikes use proprietary fittings to reduce theft, it would not be possible to install one of these on a bike-share bike. The trailers you are asking about appear to attach to a seat post. Bike share bikes always have adjustable (but not removable) seat posts. You should have no ...


2

My own personal experience of the Melbourne BikeShare scheme is relatively extensive and I have spoken to quite a few tourists at the various kiosks even if only to help them understand how it works(It is actually quite simple and easy by international standards). Invariably they express a disinterest in hiring a bike when they learn that a helmet is ...


2

An additional resource that may point the way for the future: "A vending machine that serves up safety: MIT class creates bike helmet dispenser" for use in conduction with Boston's Hubway cycle hire scheme. The first of these are now being deployed in Boston.


1

This is standard practice on bike share systems that do not have a fault notification system. E.g., On Antwerp Belgium's bike share, rotating the seat is the recommended way of notifying the bike share maintenance workers and other riders.


1

I had a big clip that was supposed to be used to accept a ball attachment for like your windshield suction cup style cell phone holder and you could just clip it to something like a basket or a laptop screen or whatever. It had a strong spring and could be used to mount to that book holder basket thing, but for the life of me I can't find anything similar!! ...


1

Phone Attachment: I would need to get better views of the front of the bike. Probably fab something starting with an existing mount (looks like you started down that direction). Map Case: It looks like you already have a map case, if not, do a search. If you take one that will fit more or less in the gap on the bar and add some lengths of double sided ...


1

Many smaller, university-based bike sharing programs provide helments. For example, the City Cycles program at the University of Rochester (in New York) provides helmets: We have 20 street bikes (Gary Fisher brand) with fat, smooth tires for fast rolling and no punctures. We also have one tandem (a "bicycle built for two"). All bikes come with racks. ...



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