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3 basic tips Try to be predictive in your shifting. Don't wait until you really need the next lower gear to change gears. Try to do it before your cadence drops to where you're mashing on the pedals Ease up on the pedals when shifting. If you missed on the first tip, then let up on the mashing very briefly during the downshift. This will aid the chain in ...


3

Remember, very few road racers are giving it hell from a standing start. The vast majority of the time they are traveling at a fairly high rate of speed as they approach the end of the race (With the lead out for the sprint, positioning, etc), so the need to jump multiple gears is very limited. Other times where quick acceleration is needed is to jump a gap ...


3

The following links will show you how to adjust a derailleur: http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/rear-derailler-adjustments-derailleur Note that cables and derailleurs do need replacing from time to time and they do need occasional adjustment, but try to follow one of the derailleur adjustment ...


2

My standard approach, and the approach I'd recommend for starting, is to use the front derailer to select a "range" -- big ring for flat road with no headwind, middle ring for slightly more challenging conditions (or riding in traffic), and small ring for serious uphill climbs. Then adjust the rear to select a comfortable gear within that range. Or, if ...


2

Having more than one chainring (one of the front gears) expands the total gearing range available to you. Having multiple chainrings gives you a higher high gear for cruising at high speed as well as a lower low gear for spinning up hills. The difference in the number of teeth between chainrings is much larger than the difference between sprockets in the ...


1

Change gears before you need to You can do this two ways. Change to a higher gear before you stop. Get out of the saddle when you start. You'll accelerate faster and shouldn't need to change gears until your doing 30 kph (20 mph) or so. Or change gears regularly as you start, say every 3 or 4 pedal strokes. 1, 2, 3, change. 1, 2, 3, change.


1

As you suggested, the cable may be at fault. I change my gear cables once or twice a year to keep shifting smooth and free. If the cable/cable housing are old and worn they could be offering resistance. If that resistance is too high the springs in the derailleur may not be strong enough to pull the cable through. Try removing the cable and housing, ...


1

First disconnect the cable to rear derailleur and using your hand push the derailleur towards the spokes and then release it. Do you feel any binding? If so, something is wrong with your derailleur. With the rear derailleur cable still disconnected, grab hold of the cable and slide it through the housings. Is it catching on anything? Some resistance is ...


1

From working on bikes, the amount of force needed to pull a gear cable is more than I can apply gripping the cable with my fingers, but is easy to apply gripping the cable with pliers. So probably about 10-20N. But almost all that force is required to oppose the return spring in the derailleur. Remove that spring and the force drops by an order of magnitude. ...



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