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6

I would suggest temperature change may be affecting the cable housing dimensions, which in turn affects the cable tension and therefore the dérailleur settings. I have been noticing this happening to myself this fall, especially switching to a bike with full length housing and 10 speeds on the rear dérailleur. With the large daily temperature changes in ...


6

Its likely that your bad shifting is due to messed up cables or a misadjusted derailleur. You can either cut the cable crimp off at the end of the cable with a pair of pliers, or pull it off with a pair of pliers. As for replacing the cable housing, you can either get your bike shop to cut a piece of housing of the right length by taking your old housing ...


5

In reality the derailleur doesn't care what the tooth count difference is between gears. The shifter simply moves the derailleur towards or away from the wheel. This causes the chain to be misaligned with the current gear and move to the selected gear.


5

I'm familiar with RSX brifters (brake and shift combo units) If that's what you have then its likely the grease has gummed up, stopping the under-lever from engaging the release. You might be able to finangle it a couple times by manipulating the underlever carefully, and you'll feel it catch. A blast in the guts of the brifter with brake cleaner or ...


5

Those are just gear cables, you will need to buy brake cables and outers. Good on you for building it yourself, it's definitely do-able with a modicum of skill and even with limited experience. But... there's quite a few things you can do slightly wrong that will make the bike unsafe to ride. I think it would be good to have someone check over the bike ...


4

I know Im a little late for this posting but this is the first time I came across such question. I do own a Trek Lime, purchased back in 2007. This is a fully automatic bicycle. It has 3 speeds a front hub dynamo (speed sensor), a shifter module-solenoid (computer) under the center frame, and the 3 speed auto-shifter hub in the rear wheel. As far as I know ...


4

Since everything else is working, this is when I suspect hanger alignment. Where the rear derailleur bolts on to the bike, just under the quick release/axle, is a relatively fragile piece of metal. They get bent if the derailleur is bumped hard, and for that reason are often replaceable parts. The problem is sufficiently common that there's a tool made ...


4

SL-RS35 is correct, there are newer versions however, there are many you can replace it with. Shimano uses a 2 to 1 pull ratio for shifters, Sram uses a 1 to 1 except for their entry level MX lines. In layman's terms you will be fine with just about any twist shifter made for 3x7 speed, Shimano Tourney or Revo twist, Sunrace, or Sram MRX Comp ...


4

You probably need to adjust the 'top stop' screw on the rear mech, and also tighten the rear gear cable. The rear mech has two small screws. One of these adjusts how far up/inward the mech will move and the other screw adjusts how far down/outward it will move. They are used to prevent the chain dropping off the top and bottom of the cassette. Work out ...


3

I beg to differ! I spy more cables hiding in the carpet If you have two pairs of cables, the thicker ones are for the brakes (thicker=stronger in this case) So there will be some lengths of housing to match each pair, in two sizes to suit the cables. The lengths of brake housing will be one short (front brake) and one long (rear brake). You can run the ...


2

I would concur that the solution here is to increase the length of the cable housing that is inferring with the rack. If the rack is putting any pressure on the cable housing, then it will interfere with the ability of the derailleur to shift properly. Depending on how much free cable is left over coming out of the derailleur, You will most likely need to ...


2

As the Nuvinci system has been mentioned in other answers, I'll mention one more. SRAM makes the Automatix hub now. It's a 2 speed system (ratios 1:1, 1:1.37) with a centrifugal clutch. There's no manual shifting possible and no cables involved.


2

It sounds as though the return spring in the rear derailleur is no longer strong enough to push it back. Most likely the grease or oil in the system has dried out and become glue, probably dusty glue, over the time the bike wasn't used. One easy test (that may also fix the problem) is to leave the shifter set to high gear and while pedalling the bike on the ...


1

It depends. Rear derailleur lever geometry, shifter cable pull and clicks amount control rear derailleur lateral movement amount. Let's assume that there are 11 cogs with distance of 10mm between each other and derailler moves 10mm every click. 11 speed cassette might have the same width, which means 10% lesser distance between cogs, so it's 9mm. When ...


1

The FD needs to have a firm spring, because it has to operate against the full chain load when peddling. By comparison, the RD operates on a piece of chain under no tension, and the RD is putting the tension on that length. So you need to check the inner cable that runs from the handlebar shifter down to the FD mech. If its bright-shiny silvery then that'...


1

From the sound of the issues you are describing, I expect your derailleur hanger is misaligned. When troubleshooting rear derailleur setup, these are the basic steps. (I know you said you've checked some of these. I'm still including them for the sake of a complete answer.) Disconnect the cable from the cable fixing bolt, and remove it from the ...


1

I believe a Shimano SL-RS41-7 is compatible. I have one in my spare parts box and they look identical. A quick google search shows lots of sources. Most E Bay listings are under $20 for the set.


1

Think of the problem from the other perspective. The designer of the cassette knows how much the derailleur will move the chain laterally - nearly constant each shift. That's all the derailleur really does. The designer can therefore design the profile of the cassette teeth and the position of each cog 'clockwise' relative to the next one to enable good ...


1

Switch the chain to a cog in the middle of the cassette. Suspend the bike, put it on a work-stand or get a helper lift the rear wheel and turn the crank. Listen for noise from the chain on the cog. If there is any, turn the barrel adjuster (the thing in lower right corner of the pic, where the cable housing meets the derailleur) left or right by one click at ...


1

I know this is an old post but it comes up top in search and so might help others. I had this problem with SRAM Rival, stiff front derailleur and a loud clunk when shifting to the small ring. I found that it was caused by a misrouting of the cable around the anchor bolt such that excessive force was required to overcome the poor leverage. After fiddling ...


1

The chain has to go pretty straight. The position you put it in - from big to big - is actually not the right position, so you should avoid this. But for the theory of your question: the derailleur leads your chain. While you pedaling the right way forward, rear derailleur leads the chain to rear cogs, and front derailleur to the chainrings. But when you ...


1

Right, so I took it to the bike shop and the issue turned out to be the gear cable being loose. The bicycle mechanic was a bit sceptical that this could have been caused by poor weather/fog so it's likely that in the process of cleaning my bike I loosened it up inadvertently (however I took it for a quick ride afterwards and it all seemed okay, so I'm not ...


1

There is a problem with the cable that links the shifter to the mechanism (rear derailleur) The cable has become slack over time and needs to be tighter. You can tighten it by turning a barrel adjuster if there is one present. it might be as pictured and there might be one where the cable leaves the shifter on the handlebar. looking in the direction of the ...


1

After watching both videos, I believe that whatever bent the rear derailer also bent the derailer hanger, which has your rear derailer out of alignment. The rear derailer/derailleur is that complicated part you replaced that moves the chain between gears on the rear, and also keeps the chain from getting loose and falling off. On most bikes, the rear ...


1

I didn't see the video but if your talking about the last 2 lower gears you may need to loose the tension cable. if its the top 2 big gears then you may need to tighten. make sure you derailleur is installed correctly. make sure the last pulley lines up at all cogs especially the biggest one, using your hand and pushing this up and down the cassette, make ...


1

The derailleur was sticking. A bit of lubrication and all was good again.


1

You're trying to pull more cable through but the shifter is already in min gear after one click, while the derailleur is not. The shifter needs to be in the correct gear (smallest cog) when you install the cable. So when the cable is un-done, you should repeatedly press the thumb shifter while pulling the cable until all the tension is released. Then ...


1

Assuming that the cabling is clean, that the derailleur is nicely indexed and well alligned, the derailleur hanger not bent, and the chain correctly moves lateraly +/- 4mm for each gear up or down, then I would have a look at the distance between the upper jockey pulley and the sprockets. The distance should be on all sprockets less than 25 mm and more than ...


1

The Sora is poorly designed. The hinge should clear when it derails out to the small cog, but when you have the B-screw all the way out and that hinge is pulled in tight, it hits itself (the part of the derailleur that is fixed to the hanger). It is simply having difficulty clearing to the outside. so... the tradeoff... tighten the b-screw... Shifting ...



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