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13

You have a double front, right? The usual advice is to not shift into the highest 3 gears in the rear cassette when in front the chain is on the large chainring, and to not shift into the smallest 3 cogs, when the chain in front is on the small chainring. This prevents 'cross-chaining', which wears the chain fast, produces noise and difficult shifting. ...


8

Not using the upper and lower gears is a very effective solution. Stupid, but effective. Traditionally one would simply use the limit screws (at the rear derailleur, often marked L(ow) and H(igh)). Shift to the lowest/highest gear (front and rear) and tighten the screw so that it only allows the mech to move ever so slightly over the edge of the ...


7

The B-screw controls the body angle of the derailleur. It pulls the pulleys away from the sprockets, so you don't rub against them. If you set it in the largest rear cog (as you should), when you're adequately clear, you don't have rubbing. Its a somewhat insensitive adjustment once you clear the cogs, but the closer you are to the loosest screw value ...


5

Crossing chaining hasn't been any problem at all since the invention of bushless chains 20+ years ago and wasn't even a real problem back in the ancient days. It's a persistent myth that just won't die... Your bike should leave the shop capable of shifting into any combo of gears possible and riding any amount of time you like in that gear. At most I would ...


3

Remember, very few road racers are giving it hell from a standing start. The vast majority of the time they are traveling at a fairly high rate of speed as they approach the end of the race (With the lead out for the sprint, positioning, etc), so the need to jump multiple gears is very limited. Other times where quick acceleration is needed is to jump a gap ...


3

The following links will show you how to adjust a derailleur: http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/rear-derailler-adjustments-derailleur Note that cables and derailleurs do need replacing from time to time and they do need occasional adjustment, but try to follow one of the derailleur adjustment ...


3

You might consider working on your cadence range; if you are able to spin up to 120-130 RPM, you will have a larger range and won't need to shift as often. One-legged drills and pure cadence drills can work well for this.


2

If its a low quality bike, you're probably best off just selling it and buying a decent bike to begin with -- there are good used road bikes for reasonably low prices. The first problem is that cheap road bikes likely don't even have cassette+freehub systems -- they have freewheels. High quality freewheels aren't cheap, and you do need a freewheel remover ...


2

User6527 is wrong there. You can not use derailleur shifters due to the different cable length that is pulled or pushed to shift to another gear. You can not use other brands' shifters either for the same reason. The shifter you mention yourselve is available in black and silver, and both with and without integrated brake lever. There is also a 'cheaper' ...


2

Are all of those pictures in the same gear? Big in front and 4th in rear? On the picture of the derailleur it is pretty much maxed out giving chain length. Notice it is swung way forward. When you go small small it is the opposite. The derailleur has to take up the maximum amount of chain - swing back. Most likely your derailleur will not take the ...


1

Last year I found my girlfriend an older Takara (classic steel frame) with shimano SIS components, and it worked fine. Yes, the components were flimsy, junky, and jumped on certain gears, but it got the job done until we could upgrade it. The next year we purchased a Trek 600 (aluminum frame) with all shimano 600 components and stripped it. We then ...


1

What does "two inches too high" mean? And by first gear, do you mean the smallest (i.e. hardest) sprocket/cog? If so, (actually, even if it's the largest cog), the screw you first want to adjust (before making changes to the B-limit screw) is the high (or low) limit screw. These are the screws that define the limits of the derailleur in terms of how far in ...


1

Change gears before you need to You can do this two ways. Change to a higher gear before you stop. Get out of the saddle when you start. You'll accelerate faster and shouldn't need to change gears until your doing 30 kph (20 mph) or so. Or change gears regularly as you start, say every 3 or 4 pedal strokes. 1, 2, 3, change. 1, 2, 3, change.


1

That comes down whether the internal mechanism of the different Nexus 3 hubs are the same or not. My guess is they are the same. Some options for you: I had a similar issue with a Nexus 8 hub. In the end I checked with a Shimano approved service center in near me (looked up on Shimano's page). I talked in person to the mechanic, and he knew which would ...



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