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13

You have a double front, right? The usual advice is to not shift into the highest 3 gears in the rear cassette when in front the chain is on the large chainring, and to not shift into the smallest 3 cogs, when the chain in front is on the small chainring. This prevents 'cross-chaining', which wears the chain fast, produces noise and difficult shifting. ...


8

Not using the upper and lower gears is a very effective solution. Stupid, but effective. Traditionally one would simply use the limit screws (at the rear derailleur, often marked L(ow) and H(igh)). Shift to the lowest/highest gear (front and rear) and tighten the screw so that it only allows the mech to move ever so slightly over the edge of the ...


7

The B-screw controls the body angle of the derailleur. It pulls the pulleys away from the sprockets, so you don't rub against them. If you set it in the largest rear cog (as you should), when you're adequately clear, you don't have rubbing. Its a somewhat insensitive adjustment once you clear the cogs, but the closer you are to the loosest screw value ...


5

Crossing chaining hasn't been any problem at all since the invention of bushless chains 20+ years ago and wasn't even a real problem back in the ancient days. It's a persistent myth that just won't die... Your bike should leave the shop capable of shifting into any combo of gears possible and riding any amount of time you like in that gear. At most I would ...


4

Completely stopping pedaling will not let you shift gears at all. You do have to reduce the tension in the top of the chain to shift front, so pedal, but with small force. The derailleur cannot push the chain sideways if it is under too much tension and thus pulled tight against the chainrings. It is normal to reduce pedaling force when shifting.


3

Use the Clutch! This is what I always tell people when I'm teaching them how to shift gears properly. Chain-rings and Cogs are machined with *pickup points" that assist transferring the chain from one ring to the other, they only work while you're turning the cranks. So I tell people to let all the power off of their pedals, but keep the cranks turning and ...


2

Are all of those pictures in the same gear? Big in front and 4th in rear? On the picture of the derailleur it is pretty much maxed out giving chain length. Notice it is swung way forward. When you go small small it is the opposite. The derailleur has to take up the maximum amount of chain - swing back. Most likely your derailleur will not take the ...


2

If it was me, I'd release the gear cable so there is no tension at all on the front mech. Then move the gear lever / changer to the position the changer would be in if you weere in the 1st chainring. Then make sure that the adjusting screws are set correctly, so that when you look at front mech from above, it is centred over the 1st, smallest chainring. ...


2

This sounds like a problem shifting gears. Most bicycles have a gear that is so easy you can easily spin the pedals it up all but the most brutal of hills. However, this does not mean going up the hill at a steady pace will be easy just because the gear is easy. "Hard" Gears (High Gear): Your tires spin quite a bit with each revolution of the pedals. ...


2

Clean and dry (hair-dryer) the derailleur. Relube. Check. If necessary take out the cables, chase the water from the housings by pressing thin oil with a syringe. Put the cables back in or replace with new ones. It's always a good idea to change the cables before winter if you've been riding through rain in the good season. And change them again at the ...


2

If its a low quality bike, you're probably best off just selling it and buying a decent bike to begin with -- there are good used road bikes for reasonably low prices. The first problem is that cheap road bikes likely don't even have cassette+freehub systems -- they have freewheels. High quality freewheels aren't cheap, and you do need a freewheel remover ...


1

If you're talking about a twist shifter, they DO make those still! Sram makes a shimano compatible version. Know that the MRX is shimano, and the other models that have numbers are sram only. If thats not to your liking, the thumb-shifter that Batman was mentioning is a solid option for a few bucks!


1

Typically not -- a few index shifters (like my Shimano 105SC 7 speed ones) have this option, but its primarily downtube and bar end ones for <=8 speeds. I don't think there exist any other shifters that do this other than possibly some grip shifts since they pretty much are letting pawls catch. However, you can buy friction shifters pretty cheaply these ...


1

It sounds like the front derailleur needs adjustment. If you recently bought the bike from a shop then take it back for adjustment. If that's the problem then it will take only a few minutes. If it's worse, such a bent chain ring it will likely cost $$. If you want to do it yourself, check out the front derailleur questions. To change gears using ...


1

As Sander already noted not turning the gears will not allow shifting at all. Thus turning the pedals without really stressing them is key. When shifting to a higher gear with such a system it might be necessary to firmly press the shifting lever when shifting the front gear up, or even shift twice if misconfigurated. That stopping the pedaling helps for ...


1

A friction shifter allows you to continuously move the derailleur. The point of this on a front shifter (the left) is to trim the front derailleur. Trimming the front derailleur is when you tweak the position of the front derailleur to account for the change in chain angle with shifting, e.g. eliminate the chain rubbing on the cage of the derailleur. There ...


1

It sounds like an alignment issue, possibly with your limit screw for the lowest gear being "too low". Your best bet might be to follow a guide to realign the derailleur. Something like this


1

I'd try replacing your cables and housing and running full housing (if possible). Most fat / winter bikes are designed for full housing for this reason. Doing the switch now will assure you are starting with a fresh slate. Additionally, you may try switching to a wax / dry lube for the cold season and clean the old lube off your drivetrain. If you have ...


1

Take a close look at the limit screw - is the derailleur actually hitting it? If not, then it's possible that the spring which pulls it to the right is worn out. If that's the case, you might be able to replace the spring, but unless it's a really expensive derailleur, you're better off just replacing the whole thing.


1

The first thing to do with any rear derailleur problem is to check if its bent. If it is bent, go to your LBS and see if it can be unbent (there is a special tool for checking unbent-ness, Park Tool DAG-2 or similar) -- bent derailleurs cannot be adjusted properly in most cases (and even a minor spill can cause a bent derailleur). If its not bent, then try ...


1

Last year I found my girlfriend an older Takara (classic steel frame) with shimano SIS components, and it worked fine. Yes, the components were flimsy, junky, and jumped on certain gears, but it got the job done until we could upgrade it. The next year we purchased a Trek 600 (aluminum frame) with all shimano 600 components and stripped it. We then ...


1

Like you say - the 8 speed shifter will work perfectly well with a 7 speed cassette. You just lose the use of 1-click too many. Poor shifting in the downward direction is usually a sign of poor cabling. Either old cables or poor routing. But you mention poor shifting in both directions - which looks suspiciously like a problem with the shifter itself. Mark ...


1

What does "two inches too high" mean? And by first gear, do you mean the smallest (i.e. hardest) sprocket/cog? If so, (actually, even if it's the largest cog), the screw you first want to adjust (before making changes to the B-limit screw) is the high (or low) limit screw. These are the screws that define the limits of the derailleur in terms of how far in ...


1

That comes down whether the internal mechanism of the different Nexus 3 hubs are the same or not. My guess is they are the same. Some options for you: I had a similar issue with a Nexus 8 hub. In the end I checked with a Shimano approved service center in near me (looked up on Shimano's page). I talked in person to the mechanic, and he knew which would ...


1

The bike is designed to support your weight during normal driving conditions, namely sitting. However you can usually stand up with little extra tear since the frame is constructed to support your entire weight on any one pedal (Usually how you get on to the bike in the first place). Care should be taken as to how much force you apply to the drive chain, but ...



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