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0

Further to Blam's answer about the position of the pulley (which takes up the slack in the chain), my hybrid/touring bike was recently serviced by a very experienced French shop mechanic of racing bikes. He put on a chain which was too short (i.e. it pulled tight and jammed) if, when I rode it, I cross-chained it onto both big rings: and when I told him ...


5

Crossing chaining hasn't been any problem at all since the invention of bushless chains 20+ years ago and wasn't even a real problem back in the ancient days. It's a persistent myth that just won't die... Your bike should leave the shop capable of shifting into any combo of gears possible and riding any amount of time you like in that gear. At most I would ...


-1

What your mechanic said, is true for most drivetrains. And there's absolutely no point in using extreme combinations, such as 1:8 or 3:1, as they are doubled by 2:somethings (first number meaning the front gear, second for rear gear). All you need is all 2:x plus probably no more than 1:1, 1:2, 3:7 and 3:8. Here's a ratio calculation I made for a 11-32 ...


2

Are all of those pictures in the same gear? Big in front and 4th in rear? On the picture of the derailleur it is pretty much maxed out giving chain length. Notice it is swung way forward. When you go small small it is the opposite. The derailleur has to take up the maximum amount of chain - swing back. Most likely your derailleur will not take the ...


13

You have a double front, right? The usual advice is to not shift into the highest 3 gears in the rear cassette when in front the chain is on the large chainring, and to not shift into the smallest 3 cogs, when the chain in front is on the small chainring. This prevents 'cross-chaining', which wears the chain fast, produces noise and difficult shifting. ...


8

Not using the upper and lower gears is a very effective solution. Stupid, but effective. Traditionally one would simply use the limit screws (at the rear derailleur, often marked L(ow) and H(igh)). Shift to the lowest/highest gear (front and rear) and tighten the screw so that it only allows the mech to move ever so slightly over the edge of the ...


0

User 6527 is probably right actually; 3 speed hubs really only need to be accurately adjusted in second gear; pull more cable and you're in 3rd gear on a shimano hub or 1st gear on a SA hub, release cable and you're in 1st on a shimano hub or 3rd on an SA hub. The problem comes with 7 and 8 speed nexus hubs that aren't compatible with 7 or 8 speed derailleur ...


1

Last year I found my girlfriend an older Takara (classic steel frame) with shimano SIS components, and it worked fine. Yes, the components were flimsy, junky, and jumped on certain gears, but it got the job done until we could upgrade it. The next year we purchased a Trek 600 (aluminum frame) with all shimano 600 components and stripped it. We then ...


2

If its a low quality bike, you're probably best off just selling it and buying a decent bike to begin with -- there are good used road bikes for reasonably low prices. The first problem is that cheap road bikes likely don't even have cassette+freehub systems -- they have freewheels. High quality freewheels aren't cheap, and you do need a freewheel remover ...



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