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12

Typically the majority of their yearly R&D is spent on their top of the line group, then they will trickle down it's technology to the next lower group, and continue that way, so usually, this years tiagra is close to last years 105, etc. The major thing to look for is # of speeds in a group, weight, and finish. I believe the 2010 Sora(3400) set is ...


9

Answer: No you don't need a new hub. However, you will probably need to put a small (~1mm) spacer at the back of the cassette, otherwise you won't be able to tighten the whole cassette down. Also be aware that prolonged use of a 10-speed cassette on an 8/9-speed freehub body will cause dents to form in the freehub body (because the 10-speed cogs are so ...


8

Presumably with 12K+ km, and never having bought new chain rings, you have a very high cadence. You should get a new chain every time you change your cassette, btw. If you are doing the work yourself, I don't see any reason to change the chain ring immediately. Try the new cassette and chain and see how it works. If it isn't broke, don't fix it. If it ...


8

That particular Shimano freehub can be disassembled, but it is quite a job to get it back together afterward. There are around 80 2mm bearings in two different locations in the freehub, and a skilled and practiced mechanic has roughly a 60% chance of opening without losing parts, and successfully getting it back together. The good news is, there is a tool ...


7

Assuming the hub is a freehub design (the freewheel mechanism is in a splined body onto which the cassette (sprockets) fit), no. 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes are all the same width. See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/k7.html#10cassettes


7

These are just editions of specific product lines. It's the same as BMW with the 3-series, 5-series and 7-series. Let's take Shimano Dura-Ace, for instance. It's traditionally a 7000-series of product numbers. 7200 - 1978-era Dura-Ace 7400 - Mid-to-late 1980's 7700 - 9-speed Dura-Ace ~ late 1990's 7800 - 10-speed Dura-Ace ~ 2000's 7900 - Current ...


7

From your photo, the left pulley (beefier, with metal bushing) is the top one, which goes closer to the cassette. I know that because that's how things were in every shimano derailer I had over the years, and I think that makes pretty much sense, since the beefier pulley (the upper one) actually shifts the gears, while the bottom, thinner one is only an ...


7

First, make sure your bike is fit properly - with a bad fit, your efficiency is likely lousy. More sprockets is not necessarily going to make you go faster/easier - changing gear appropriately and becoming more physically fit will (along with better selected sprockets sizes - we went ages before the Gillette razor-blade increase in rear sprockets...). Most ...


7

As long as you existing rotors are in good condition and thicker than 1.6mm (minimum safe thickness) you should have no issue with using them with the Shimanos. There doesn't seem to be an industry standard specification for rotor thickness but it is generally taken to be between 1.8mm - 2.0mm. The new callipers will self adjust to the rotor width. Clean ...


6

You will need a 10-speed cassette, 10-speed rear derailleur, and 10-speed right side shifter and a 10-speed chain to work with the narrower spacing on the rear cassette. There tend to be some compatibility issues with 9-speed derailleurs run on a 10-speed drivetrain (some people seem to have luck using 9-speed shimano mountain derailleurs with 10-speed ...


5

I would only replace if: The chain is skipping because of wear of the teeth You get chainsuck even when the chain is clean (small chainrings are more prone to chainsuck) For cassettes I would not consider changing unless it skips when you have put on a new chain. The best tactic is to change your chain often enough so that you minimise the wear in your ...


5

While price is not the defining factor, there is no doubt that it is a key indicator of quality. List of Groupsets Below is a list of the three largest manufacturer's groupsets for Road and MTB applications. Each manufacturer's offering is arranged in descending price/quality. The number of sprockets of the cassette in each groupset is shown in ...


5

The Ultegra 6600 STI lever is available as a right hand only part. It should cost around $400 dollars for the right shifter only, and around $600 dollars for the set. Any Shimano 10 speed rear shifter, including the new Tiagra 4600 10 speed will be compatible. If you have current brakes, and you use a 10 speed STI lever, as previously noted, you will have ...


5

The Deore XT is a mountain bike derailleur and as such has is long cage dérailleur. Long cage dérailleurs can run larger cassettes for a larger gearing range (at the cost of larger jumps between gears). I don't know what the Shimano product selection was like in 1999, but you can now get Shimano 105 as either long or short cage depending on your set up (see ...


4

Judging by Sheldon's Guide, it definitely looks like you are in need of a new chainring. Your middle and larger sprockets in particular look like they have taken on a significant ramp-like profile, which will surely lead to lackluster shifting.


4

Some people have modded the pedals to add set-screws which provide better grip. Typically this involves drilling a hole, tapping it for threads, and adding a set screw of the desired length. For example, here's an a530 with 2x set screws added:


4

I would pay a visit to your local skateboard shop and get some 'skateboard grip tape'. This should be inexpensive and it can be applied in such a way that your pedals are not permanently damaged. The glue on the stuff is pretty good and it is pretty much totally designed for keeping feet in place. Your pedals might look a bit naff with bits of tape wrapped ...


4

Your basic barrel adjuster is a tube with a thread on the outside of one end. The threaded end fits into a female threaded piece, either the shifter itself or another tube. (If you have this second type, where the female end is another tube, it's necessary to hold that second tube stationary while turning the first tube.) The cable passes through the ...


4

As long as you use a Shimano brake caliper designed for a road STI lever, which is any Tiagra, 105, Ultegra, or Dura-Ace, they will work not just well, but perfectly. There may be a performance difference, but there will not be a compatibility difference. Even most 3rd party brake calipers will work just fine.


4

I'm going to assume two things: 1) Your current setup was is all 9-speed and has never been upgraded from 8-speed, and 2) your shifters are indexed and not friction shifters. If either of those are wrong, it changes things. That said... You are correct about the cassette, right shifter, and chain. You will also need a new rear derailleur. You'll most likely ...


4

I don't think you will need to change the frame, I looked at one of the bianchi series a while back and I saw the same frame (the Oltre - I can but dream) offered at different prices depending on the groupset. But the groupsets available were from both shimano and campag. There's variations with Dura Ace, Ultegra, Athena, Super Record etc. I can't imagine ...


4

I love ATF (Automatic Transmission Fluid) for freewheel (not free hub) lube. What I do is lift the bike-- if someone can help you with this, it's a bit easier-- so that you can rotate the pedals (and make the back wheel spin). Ideally, the bike should be tilted to the non-drive side about 45-60 degrees. With the back wheel rotating, you can see where to ...


4

The measurement that is important here is the caliper reach. As always, there's a great article on Sheldon Brown's website Reach is the effective length of the arms of a caliper brake. This is measured from the centerline of the center bolt diagonally down to the middle of the brake shoe. Reach is commonly expressed as a range (allowing for the fact that ...


4

You don't need to worry about that. There are nearly no components on your bike -- except for the hub and bottom bracket bearings -- that are sealed to be more or less waterproof. Most of the components are totally fine with water on or in them. Especially for your shifters: their internals are mostly made out of plastic so no need to worry. As they are ...


4

All Shimano components have a series number (not serial number) embossed or engraved in the component. While it is possible that the numbers may be worn off or scratched over on older components, the theory you are working under seems to indicate that you would be looking for newer, lower level components, rather than older higher end stuff. Check the back ...


4

You should use Shimano mountain bike shifters (Acera, Alivio, Deore, etc.) which have the same # of chainrings and same # of cogs on the cassette. So if you're running a triple in the front and a 9 speed cassette in the back, you want a 3x9 shifter set. The road bike ones (Sora, Tiagra, 105, Claris, Ultegra, etc. - even flat bar ones, like the Sora flat ...


4

As long as you use a ten speed chain it shouldn't matter which group you take it from. Normally the higher priced ones are bit lighter but the additional price often does by far not match the lower weight. Also the higher priced ones might last not that long due to the lighter material. Therefore if it's for a bike where you know that it will see some dirt ...


4

The cable routing is different. Ultegra is designed to allow both cables to route along the handlebar (instead of that cable sticking out the side of the brake lever like on Sora), to give you a cleaner look and less chance of the cable getting in your way. Ultegra is higher quality than Sora. It should shift a bit better, or at least go more miles before ...


4

Usually racing front derailleurs like an arabesque will not allow the extra tolerance for a third ring. With that being said, the only way to know for sure is to try it. One thing to keep in mind is that the spindle length on your bottom bracket affects this as well. While your derailleur may have the extra tolerance to fudge it in some cases, if your ...


4

I-spec is a Shimano-proprietary mounting system for Shimano parts. Its supposed to make mounting and adjusting brake+shift levers faster and easier by putting them on one mounting clamp. I couldn't find a blurb on what it does / how it operates on the Shimano website, but the equivalent for SRAM is SRAM Matchmaker, which from their website: "The ...



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