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13

Typically the majority of their yearly R&D is spent on their top of the line group, then they will trickle down it's technology to the next lower group, and continue that way, so usually, this years tiagra is close to last years 105, etc. The major thing to look for is # of speeds in a group, weight, and finish. I believe the 2010 Sora(3400) set is ...


12

The name of the company you're looking for is Shimano (with one n, not two)


12

There's a couple of things here. First there are the physical properties of the groupsets. As you move up the groupsets, what you're buying into is essentially smoothness and lightness. But for a recreational rider, you'd basically need the groupset to hit a certain minimum level of quality, and anything beyond that would be lost by the rider. And my ...


10

This is an odd question. The sentiment that the only security here is physical security is correct. Think about the following: The Shimano Di2 components are not mated/matched to a specific computer or instance of E-Tube software. So there's no 1:1 relationship. Therefore, any computer equipped with the SM-PCE1 or SM-BCR2 programming cables can be used to ...


9

Answer: No you don't need a new hub. However, you will probably need to put a small (~1mm) spacer at the back of the cassette, otherwise you won't be able to tighten the whole cassette down. Also be aware that prolonged use of a 10-speed cassette on an 8/9-speed freehub body will cause dents to form in the freehub body (because the 10-speed cogs are so ...


8

Presumably with 12K+ km, and never having bought new chain rings, you have a very high cadence. You should get a new chain every time you change your cassette, btw. If you are doing the work yourself, I don't see any reason to change the chain ring immediately. Try the new cassette and chain and see how it works. If it isn't broke, don't fix it. If it ...


8

That particular Shimano freehub can be disassembled, but it is quite a job to get it back together afterward. There are around 80 2mm bearings in two different locations in the freehub, and a skilled and practiced mechanic has roughly a 60% chance of opening without losing parts, and successfully getting it back together. The good news is, there is a tool ...


8

As long as you existing rotors are in good condition and thicker than 1.6mm (minimum safe thickness) you should have no issue with using them with the Shimanos. There doesn't seem to be an industry standard specification for rotor thickness but it is generally taken to be between 1.8mm - 2.0mm. The new callipers will self adjust to the rotor width. Clean ...


7

Assuming the hub is a freehub design (the freewheel mechanism is in a splined body onto which the cassette (sprockets) fit), no. 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes are all the same width. See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/k7.html#10cassettes


7

These are just editions of specific product lines. It's the same as BMW with the 3-series, 5-series and 7-series. Let's take Shimano Dura-Ace, for instance. It's traditionally a 7000-series of product numbers. 7200 - 1978-era Dura-Ace 7400 - Mid-to-late 1980's 7700 - 9-speed Dura-Ace ~ late 1990's 7800 - 10-speed Dura-Ace ~ 2000's 7900 - Current ...


7

From your photo, the left pulley (beefier, with metal bushing) is the top one, which goes closer to the cassette. I know that because that's how things were in every shimano derailer I had over the years, and I think that makes pretty much sense, since the beefier pulley (the upper one) actually shifts the gears, while the bottom, thinner one is only an ...


7

First, make sure your bike is fit properly - with a bad fit, your efficiency is likely lousy. More sprockets is not necessarily going to make you go faster/easier - changing gear appropriately and becoming more physically fit will (along with better selected sprockets sizes - we went ages before the Gillette razor-blade increase in rear sprockets...). Most ...


7

The picture is a RD-M780-SGS long cage. Shimano have three codes for rear derailleur length: Short - SS Medium - GS Long - SGS I'm not aware of where this is printed on the RD though so not so helpful. However Shimano only have one non-clutched XT Dyna-Sys (10 speed) RD the RD-M780-SGS (long cage 43t capacity). The clutched (shadow+) RDs come in GS ...


6

While price is not the defining factor, there is no doubt that it is a key indicator of quality. List of Groupsets Below is a list of the three largest manufacturer's groupsets for Road and MTB applications. Each manufacturer's offering is arranged in descending price/quality. The number of sprockets of the cassette in each groupset is shown in ...


6

The Deore XT is a mountain bike derailleur and as such has is long cage dérailleur. Long cage dérailleurs can run larger cassettes for a larger gearing range (at the cost of larger jumps between gears). I don't know what the Shimano product selection was like in 1999, but you can now get Shimano 105 as either long or short cage depending on your set up (see ...


6

You will need a 10-speed cassette, 10-speed rear derailleur, and 10-speed right side shifter and a 10-speed chain to work with the narrower spacing on the rear cassette. There tend to be some compatibility issues with 9-speed derailleurs run on a 10-speed drivetrain (some people seem to have luck using 9-speed shimano mountain derailleurs with 10-speed ...


6

They still exist - they just aren't high enough in quality/product line to appear on the front page for Shimano (i.e. they aren't useful marketing points for Shimano, but you can still order parts in those groups from most cycling retailers - almost everyone who buys Tourney/Altus is an OEM or a bike shop who needs something very cheap for repairing BSO's; ...


6

I don't know anything about bottom brackets, but I found this document which says (on page 16): Shimano cartidge-bearing bottom-bracket spindles are marked with letter codes that correspond to different length spindles. These codes and the corresponding spindle lengths are: Code Length MM 107mm and 110.5mm LL 113mm D-H 115mm YL ...


5

I would only replace if: The chain is skipping because of wear of the teeth You get chainsuck even when the chain is clean (small chainrings are more prone to chainsuck) For cassettes I would not consider changing unless it skips when you have put on a new chain. The best tactic is to change your chain often enough so that you minimise the wear in your ...


5

From the picture, it looks like you have a friction shifter rather than an indexed shifter. Indexed shifters click, and friction shifters move smoothly. For a rear derailleur, you would almost always want indexed shifting because the cogs are so close together. For a crankset with 3 chainrings, friction shifting can be handy for fine-tuning the position of ...


5

If, by "a straight swap" you mean "Can I change only the crank set, and no other parts, then the answer is in short, no, it will not be a straight swap. If I read the question correctly, you are currently using a 52/39 double designed for 9 speed, and you want to install a 10 speed triple. A triple shifter has 5 positions, not 3, because it requires ...


5

The Ultegra 6600 STI lever is available as a right hand only part. It should cost around $400 dollars for the right shifter only, and around $600 dollars for the set. Any Shimano 10 speed rear shifter, including the new Tiagra 4600 10 speed will be compatible. If you have current brakes, and you use a 10 speed STI lever, as previously noted, you will have ...


5

I-spec is a Shimano-proprietary mounting system for Shimano parts. Its supposed to make mounting and adjusting brake+shift levers faster and easier by putting them on one mounting clamp. I couldn't find a blurb on what it does / how it operates on the Shimano website, but the equivalent for SRAM is SRAM Matchmaker, which from their website: "The ...


5

Perhaps instead of password protecting it, you might want to think of ways you could detect that the device was tampered with. I'm not certain how often you would change settings or plug into it, but you may want to cover the port with security tape or something similar so that you are aware when somebody has been messing with the equipment. This may not be ...


5

The first thing to do is check the brifter out to see if its actually broken - maybe its just a cable broken at the brifter or inadequate cable tension or something. You can get your bike shop to check this out. If it is broken, you can look for people who specialize in refurbishing brifters (they do exist, but they are hard to find). As for replacement ...


4

I have a Schmidt dynamo hub and it is "maintenance free". It uses sealed cartridge bearings so there is nothing to grease. The Shimano hub probably has a similar design?


4

Judging by Sheldon's Guide, it definitely looks like you are in need of a new chainring. Your middle and larger sprockets in particular look like they have taken on a significant ramp-like profile, which will surely lead to lackluster shifting.


4

Some people have modded the pedals to add set-screws which provide better grip. Typically this involves drilling a hole, tapping it for threads, and adding a set screw of the desired length. For example, here's an a530 with 2x set screws added:


4

I would pay a visit to your local skateboard shop and get some 'skateboard grip tape'. This should be inexpensive and it can be applied in such a way that your pedals are not permanently damaged. The glue on the stuff is pretty good and it is pretty much totally designed for keeping feet in place. Your pedals might look a bit naff with bits of tape wrapped ...


4

Your basic barrel adjuster is a tube with a thread on the outside of one end. The threaded end fits into a female threaded piece, either the shifter itself or another tube. (If you have this second type, where the female end is another tube, it's necessary to hold that second tube stationary while turning the first tube.) The cable passes through the ...



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