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11

The allen is almost certainly metric. Both 2.5mm and 3mm are reasonably close to 7/64 inch. 3mm is a very common size on bikes. If you are going to do any work on a bike you need metric allen wrenches.


6

Your technology is up to date. 53x12 is basically still the standard for road bikes today. If you want to increase the gearing, your best bet would be to install an 11x cassette, if not a Sram 10x. That said... If you are regularly finding your 53x12 too low it means one of three things: You are mashing (standing up in a heavy gear) instead of spinning (...


5

With reference to the new/used bits of your question, note that using worn consumables (chain, cassette etc.) on a bike is never a good idea, largely because you're in the dark as regards how much life is left in them. So my best guess is that the chain or maybe both chain and the cassette needs replacing for new parts. Assuming that these parts are ...


4

An 11 speed rear cassette gives you more linear gaps between gears. It doesn't necessarily give you higher or lower gears. There are bigger chainrings than 53 tooth, but they're rare, expensive, and tend to be single-speed track bikes. There are smaller cassettes than 12 tooth, 11 is the lowest you can get normally, and some folding bikes can go down to 9 ...


4

The hoods are different for different models of levers, but the ST-2200 uses the same ones as the ST-3300. The part you need is Shimano Y-6CU 98040. Ask your LBS to find it for you. Alternatively, you can look for 3rd party manufacturers as well but I doubt they will have something for an entry level part like this. Shimano's documentation indicates that ...


3

Any Shimano rear derailleur designed for 7 speed (3 front x 7 rear gears = 21 speed) drivetrains and mountain bike gearing will work. For your practical purposes, the compatibility chart from Shimano below gives part numbers for the available rear derailleurs which will work with a 7 speed MTB drivetrain: Those part numbers can be specifically matched ...


2

You just remove the downtube shifters, put cable stops in their place on the bosses (e.g. Shimano SM-CS50), and then route the cables for the brifters using those cable stops like you would any other bike. Tons of people have done this and are perfectly happy with it. There isn't a problem with doing this so long as the shifters are matched to drivetrain ...


2

The little piece is the pivot bushing for the lever shaft. Its' job is to prevent a metal on metal contact point. You can reposition it by loosening the cable clamp at the brake caliper, gently slide the little barrel out far enough to install the bushing. By pulling the cable back every thing should go back in place. It can be helpful to have a pair of ...


2

This problem vexed me as a beginning mechanic. Here's my best guess for a solution. Flip the bike over so it is resting bottom shell up. You'll see the cables run through a plastic piece called a cable guide. It's plastic and has two open channels for the cables to slide through, as well as gather crud. Loosen the cables, remove the guide (usually just a ...


2

I am a fan of the Nexus drivetrain. Just had to say that. Anyways, the symptoms appeared when you removed and reinstalled the wheel. There are a couple of washers on each side of the axle that aid in spacing and keep the wheel in place. Two of these washers are called anti-rotation washers. They have tabs that fit into the channel of the frame and are square ...


1

Changing to an 11 cog on the rear will certainly give you a higher gear. I found 9 speed Shimanos in 11/21 and 11/23 easily. I didn't find any road cassettes that had a lower low gear. I also found mountain bike versions with much larger low gears, but you probably need a new derailleur for them.



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