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6

If you know the model and exact year Bicycle Blue Book is a good place to start. This is a link to all the models for Peugeot: http://www.bicyclebluebook.com/BicycleDatabase.aspx?make=718


4

You could: measure the chain stretch sight if the chainrings and cogs are worn out check the wear of the tires remove the seatpost and peak inside the frame for rust pull the brakes and inspect closely the cables for rust check the wheels for trueness measure the weight of the bike with an electronic scale rock the handlebars gently to check for drag in ...


4

That bike is much older than 10 years. Probably somewhere in the '80s The bike pictured below is quite similar to yours, and was built in 1985. [Source: Peugeot 1985 product folder] Note however that these frames are generally of good quality, and if not terribly rusty can be used for many more years (and of course are very cool and retro looking). ...


2

Quick answer: You would need to use a PC, and you would need to make sure that the wheels had reasonably close original chain line positions for this to be possible. If not, then no, you can't do this. Long answer: Shimano's E-Tube software does allow you to save presets for adjustment and switch settings. That means you could have multiple presets ...


2

You'll need to change the chainwheels and the cranks, the rear derailleur, the brake-shift levers, the cassette and the chain of course. The rear wheel probably has an older hub but then if you're lucky and the hub is designed for 10-speed as well it will also take 11. The brakes won't need changing but then the newer ones are designed for less friction in ...


1

Typically, a chain uses a grease lubricant which is applied hot to the chain into every crevase of the chain before the chain is assembled. Its generally the best lube you can get on a chain, but its impossible to apply at home in the same way (contrary to sheldon brown) [aside from the fact that that particular formula is likely not sold]. Some more details ...


1

If you can pull the lever all the way to the handlebar while not getting much braking force, then it is very likely that you somehow got air into the system somewhere, and you need to bleed the entire brake system. Perhaps when you were changing the pads, you pulled the brake lever while the pads were removed, which would allow the pistons to come out too ...


1

I remember doing this last year. You need a way to keep the spring-loaded part (on the left in your pictures) out of the way while you move the other part into the correct position where you can attach the screw. If I remember correctly, I did this by sticking a long screwdriver between the axle and the spring-loaded part and holding it with one hand while ...



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