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12

There's a couple of things here. First there are the physical properties of the groupsets. As you move up the groupsets, what you're buying into is essentially smoothness and lightness. But for a recreational rider, you'd basically need the groupset to hit a certain minimum level of quality, and anything beyond that would be lost by the rider. And my ...


11

This is one of those questions that can start arguments between bike mechanics--to cross or not to cross the derailer cables. Crossing appears to be becoming more common on new bikes, if the cables aren't internal, but it's also going to depend upon the bike. Smoother shifting is reported by some from crossed cables. I would talk to the mechanic at your LBS ...


10

This is an odd question. The sentiment that the only security here is physical security is correct. Think about the following: The Shimano Di2 components are not mated/matched to a specific computer or instance of E-Tube software. So there's no 1:1 relationship. Therefore, any computer equipped with the SM-PCE1 or SM-BCR2 programming cables can be used to ...


7

They still exist - they just aren't high enough in quality/product line to appear on the front page for Shimano (i.e. they aren't useful marketing points for Shimano, but you can still order parts in those groups from most cycling retailers - almost everyone who buys Tourney/Altus is an OEM or a bike shop who needs something very cheap for repairing BSO's; ...


7

The picture is a RD-M780-SGS long cage. Shimano have three codes for rear derailleur length: Short - SS Medium - GS Long - SGS I'm not aware of where this is printed on the RD though so not so helpful. However Shimano only have one non-clutched XT Dyna-Sys (10 speed) RD the RD-M780-SGS (long cage 43t capacity). The clutched (shadow+) RDs come in GS ...


7

I have seen this frequently and routed my cables this way. By routing the shifter cable from the right side of the handlebar around the stem to the cable boss on the left side of the frame (and visa versa) I create a more gentle bend in the in the cable housing. A gentler bend creates less internal friction on the cable. Another benefit is less stress on the ...


6

I don't know anything about bottom brackets, but I found this document which says (on page 16): Shimano cartidge-bearing bottom-bracket spindles are marked with letter codes that correspond to different length spindles. These codes and the corresponding spindle lengths are: Code Length MM 107mm and 110.5mm LL 113mm D-H 115mm YL ...


6

Trek Fuel ex8 - has hydraulic disc brakes. Hydraulic disc brakes do not require adjusting - they are self-adjusting. In that, as the pad wears - the distance between pad and disc is adjusted automatically. The squeaking and squealing of disc brakes is a common complaint. My first advice would be to - bed the pads in - make sure the discs and pads are clean ...


6

If you know the model and exact year Bicycle Blue Book is a good place to start. This is a link to all the models for Peugeot: http://www.bicyclebluebook.com/BicycleDatabase.aspx?make=718


5

Perhaps instead of password protecting it, you might want to think of ways you could detect that the device was tampered with. I'm not certain how often you would change settings or plug into it, but you may want to cover the port with security tape or something similar so that you are aware when somebody has been messing with the equipment. This may not be ...


5

The first thing to do is check the brifter out to see if its actually broken - maybe its just a cable broken at the brifter or inadequate cable tension or something. You can get your bike shop to check this out. If it is broken, you can look for people who specialize in refurbishing brifters (they do exist, but they are hard to find). As for replacement ...


5

You can use either the Sora or 105 shifters (all the cable pulls will match). Sora 9 speed has the proper ergonomics (instead of the silly button that it used to use on 8 speed), so its a good shifter. As for if you will notice any performance difference, both should shift fine (if the 105's are indeed in good condition) [if you're racing, maybe you'll ...


4

Generally the cleats come with some shims for exactly this problem. If you have the box with the original pedals look around for some thin cleat shaped shims. If you can't find them, you can hand make shims out of plastic milk bottles, or ask around at the dealer to see if they have any spares handy.


4

(Proviso - I assume your existing rotors are in good condition - if not the upgrade is a replacement of a worn component which needs doing anyway.) It will be fine to use existing rotors. Rotors come in all shapes and sizes and prices, so it can get confusing, but within the same size, the difference is more about balancing cost, weight and durability, the ...


4

It sounds like you need to adjust your rear derailleur - the cable may have slipped a bit and have insufficient cable tension, or if you recently had a crash, you may have bent your derailleur. I'd recommend reading this to learn how to adjust your derailleur.


4

Couple of points:- Firstly, yes they are compatible. Yes they do shift better of standard cables, this is due to cable drag. Cable drag is basically the friction between the inner and the outer. This friction causes slower and less accurate shifting. The polymer on the inner decreases the coefficient of drag between the inner and outer, this increasing ...


4

According to BikeRadar, "The battery unit as well as the wiring for XTR Di2 are identical components to the ones used in Shimano's electronic road groups. The battery can be mounted on a bottle cage, in a seat tube, frame and can even be contained within the steerer unit of certain forks (via the use of PRO's new Tharsis components)."


4

I'm kind of confused here. You say you can only click 8 times. On a 9 speed bike, there would only be 8 clicks for shifting. Let's say you start on the largest gear, and we'll call that 1. Clicking 1 time with bring you to gear 2. Clicking 2 times will bring you to 3. Clicking 3 times with bring you to 4. Continuing on with the pattern will bring you on to ...


4

Shimano/SRAM 11 speed cassettes are wider than 8/9/10 speed ones. So yes, you need a new, wider freehub body, unless your old one was not very old and used a spacer to fit a 10-speed cassette. People with non-Shimano brand hubs are less likely to find replacement freehub bodies, it seems, leading to replacement of the whole hub, or even the whole wheel if ...


4

That bike is much older than 10 years. Probably somewhere in the '80s The bike pictured below is quite similar to yours, and was built in 1985. [Source: Peugeot 1985 product folder] Note however that these frames are generally of good quality, and if not terribly rusty can be used for many more years (and of course are very cool and retro looking). ...


4

You could: measure the chain stretch sight if the chainrings and cogs are worn out check the wear of the tires remove the seatpost and peak inside the frame for rust pull the brakes and inspect closely the cables for rust check the wheels for trueness measure the weight of the bike with an electronic scale rock the handlebars gently to check for drag in ...


3

If the 30 is worn to the point its slipping and jumping, I would my guess the others must be due for replacement, along with the chain. Individual cogs tend to only be available in high quality gear, so a new cluster will probably cost less than a single cog. Replace the cluster and chain if you can afford it. If not, the cheapest way would be to get a ...


3

Leonard Zinn has discussed Shimano and Campy 11-speed drivetrain compatibility several times in response to reader questions. Technical FAQ: Drivetrain compatibility for 10- and 11-speed Technical FAQ: Follow-up on 10- and 11-speed compatibility Drivetrain compatibility hidden in plain sight Although Zinn doesn't specifically address chain compatibility, ...


3

Yes I test rode a Sora a few years ago with those thumb shifters - truly awful. My gut feel (I know Shimano well, but don't have direct experience of this groupset) is that one is a direct replacement for the other, but the only evidence I can find to back this is a review on Amazon. For sure there'll be no problems shifting, because you're staying at ...


3

According to Shimano's website, they are non-series components. However, some websites such as this one claim they are Ultegra quality (This wouldn't surprise me with Colin's answer). In any case, none of the Shimano long reach calipers are part of a series anymore. That being said, TRP (e.g. RG957) among others still make high quality long reach calipers ...


3

For that frame size, most likely 170mm, but you can measure from the centre of the pedal spindle to the centre of the BB: A popular online bike shop lists available crank lengths of 165, 170, 175, and 180. Presumably if you buy the bike "ready built" it will come with cranks chosen to match the frame size. But 165mm cranks are relatively rare outside of ...


3

You can find what you're looking for under names like "downtube shifter lever boss kit".. You should be able to find something at a bike shop (especially one which works on older bikes) or a frame builder. Another alternative is to use a clamp.


3

You are right to say that the compact crankset will give you smaller gears to help you get over hills. You can do a straight swap of the crankset, everything else will be compatible, although will need readjustment. If you currently have a 5600 crankset, then you are absolutely safe to swap for another 5600 (compact) crankset. Now, the compatibility ...


3

I can't see how a flat inside ring with no pick-up points machined into it wouldn't be compatible, providing the bolt patterns match up (which they do, I think). The bolt patterns are compatible. There are two reasons why the chainrings still may be counted as non-compatible: Not all Shimano chainsets have identical fitting of the chainring, ...


3

As you're not clear on road vs mtb, there's two answers. For 11 spd road drivetrains Shimano uses a 1.85mm wider hub with the drive side flange closer to the centerline to compensate for the additional width. Using a spacer allows the wheel to be backwards compatible to fit a 10 spd cassette. You can't fit a 11spd freehub in place of a 10spd freehub unless ...



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