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7

First, make sure your bike is fit properly - with a bad fit, your efficiency is likely lousy. More sprockets is not necessarily going to make you go faster/easier - changing gear appropriately and becoming more physically fit will (along with better selected sprockets sizes - we went ages before the Gillette razor-blade increase in rear sprockets...). Most ...


7

As long as you existing rotors are in good condition and thicker than 1.6mm (minimum safe thickness) you should have no issue with using them with the Shimanos. There doesn't seem to be an industry standard specification for rotor thickness but it is generally taken to be between 1.8mm - 2.0mm. The new callipers will self adjust to the rotor width. Clean ...


4

All Shimano components have a series number (not serial number) embossed or engraved in the component. While it is possible that the numbers may be worn off or scratched over on older components, the theory you are working under seems to indicate that you would be looking for newer, lower level components, rather than older higher end stuff. Check the back ...


4

You should use Shimano mountain bike shifters (Acera, Alivio, Deore, etc.) which have the same # of chainrings and same # of cogs on the cassette. So if you're running a triple in the front and a 9 speed cassette in the back, you want a 3x9 shifter set. The road bike ones (Sora, Tiagra, 105, Claris, Ultegra, etc. - even flat bar ones, like the Sora flat ...


4

As long as you use a ten speed chain it shouldn't matter which group you take it from. Normally the higher priced ones are bit lighter but the additional price often does by far not match the lower weight. Also the higher priced ones might last not that long due to the lighter material. Therefore if it's for a bike where you know that it will see some dirt ...


4

The cable routing is different. Ultegra is designed to allow both cables to route along the handlebar (instead of that cable sticking out the side of the brake lever like on Sora), to give you a cleaner look and less chance of the cable getting in your way. Ultegra is higher quality than Sora. It should shift a bit better, or at least go more miles before ...


4

Usually racing front derailleurs like an arabesque will not allow the extra tolerance for a third ring. With that being said, the only way to know for sure is to try it. One thing to keep in mind is that the spindle length on your bottom bracket affects this as well. While your derailleur may have the extra tolerance to fudge it in some cases, if your ...


4

I-spec is a Shimano-proprietary mounting system for Shimano parts. Its supposed to make mounting and adjusting brake+shift levers faster and easier by putting them on one mounting clamp. I couldn't find a blurb on what it does / how it operates on the Shimano website, but the equivalent for SRAM is SRAM Matchmaker, which from their website: "The ...


3

Note : this is mostly based on my personal experience. Its an incredibly subjective subject, so there is no right answer. Keep in mind that in reality one level up or down will be completely unnoticeable performance difference to most riders. XT is considered the "Sweat spot" for performance, weight and durability. Probably X9 in the SRAM range. XTR and ...


3

As long as the 5600 and 5700 cassettes contained the same number of gears, the two cassettes will be interchangeable. They're both 10-speed, so you'll be fine. You'd have had problems going from a 9- to 10-speed, or going from a 10- to 11-speed. The reason in each case would be because of chain width. update - as @jimirings points out, the RD-5600 is spec'd ...


3

There are 2 possible causes for this type of failure. The first is a need to be cleaned and lubricated, as you have noted. That is usually a gradual failure, an would usually not result in sticking both shift levers together like you describe. On the STI lever, at the top where it joins the lever body, there is a small screw. If this screw has loosened ...


3

1) Yes, it is likely the problem 2). Aerosol Grease - comes out mixed with a volatile carrier that gets it in nearly as many places as the WD40 gets. Not as good as pulling apart and targeted greasing with small amounts in the right places as to be certain you have enough where its needed, you need a lot to go where it is not needed. Options are to do it ...


3

Kind of what Daniel said, brakes are easy. Sit down and think about it for a minute, all you have to do is switch the cables. Run the front cable to the left and run the rear cable to the right. If you want to switch the shifters you will probably run into some trouble. You won't be able to just switch the cables, you would have to get shifters that work on ...


3

In the shortest way of answering this, yes, they will be suitable for trail/xc use. All flat pedals are relatively the same. They only differ in the amount of pins, contact area, weight and their thickness. You'll want something on the thin side for trail use, as you'll be pedaling quite a bit more than if you were on a downhill bike. This will help to ...


3

The item you removed (BB-06-PSPL - 113/68) is the bottom bracket. The 113/68 means that it s 113mm spindle length and 68mm bottom bracket length this means that it is a standard size and will be easily replaced. The PSPL means that it has a Powerspline interface with the cranks, this is a Truvativ/ SRAM proprietry system so if you wish to keep the cranks you ...


2

Yes, you can order replacement parts from an LBS who is, or has access to a Shimano distributor. You are umlikely to find that rim or those spokes in stock, because they are unique to th wheel, and it is not cost effective for a shop to keep them on hand given the relatively small chance that someone will need them. Ordering them, though, should be ...


2

According to the instructions for that derailleur, the maximum sprocket size is 27 teeth. My guess is that one tooth won't make it completely inoperable, but it could. The derailleur might simply not have the range of motion to shift onto a sprocket that large. However, I'd bet that it's more likely that shifting just wouldn't be ideal. On a side note, ...


2

An 8 speed drive train will work with any 8 or 9 speed crankset. Chain width is the factor that affects compatibility but there is minimal difference between an 8 and 9 speed chain. 8,9 and 10 speed systems share the same free hub width so cogs on the cassette are spaced accordingly. The chain for these sets are all different widths to fit the rear ...


2

As suggested in the comments, follow the burn in procedure. If that fails, then you can try to reset the caliper alignment (follow the installation instructions or one of the many sites on the internet). Also clean the disc with a volatile oil solvent such as alcohol or methylated spirits. If that fails, it may be your pads - what did you have and what did ...


2

V-Brakes and calliper brakes operate with different lengths of cable being pulled. V-Brake levers pull a lot more cable and in this set up, your lever throw will be too sort to be usable and have very little stopping power. Sheldon, as usual, has more. You can get adapters to go the other way, road levers with v-brakes, but I've never seen one go this ...


2

I haven't found any campy replacement freehub for a deore... esp since shimano uses different incompatible freehub bodies for its different hubs, and Deore being a mountain group, campy being mostly road, I don't see there being any market for such a conversion. That being said, if you find a replacement campy rear hub with a similar flange size, you could ...


2

Simplest 'good' solution is probably getting a conversion cassette - campagnolo spacing but with a shimano spline so it'll fit on your existing hub. This one from ambrosio would probably do the trick - http://www.probikekit.com.au/bicycle-cassettes-sprockets/ambrosio-cassette-shimano-fit-for-campagnolo-10-speed/10768425.html Things will probably be harder ...


2

Normally to change the gearing you only need to increase and decrease the size of the cogs. The number of gears determines the difference between gear shifts, ot the end gears. No need to upgrade to 24 speed. I advise caution making too many changes as its a lower end bike and parts are expensive. Overall the bike looks reasonably geared for a road ...


1

Yes, this will work. Just get any Shimano mountain rear derailleur... SLX, deore, LX, xt, xtr, etc... EDIT: This only applies for 9 speed and lower. Here's a quote from Sheldon Brown. Within a given brand/style of rear derailer, all "speed numbers" are generally interchangeable. This applies to all indexable models, basically everything manufactured ...


1

Speaking under correction, because I don't know the exact model, but have owned Shimano & SRAM in the last few years. The two systems aren't compatible to the point that you can just swap the left side crank. But, you will be able to swap both sides. In other words, once you've taken the left side off, the right side, with chainrings and all should ...


1

Edit: First question, why did you replace the derailleur? Rear derailleurs don't really care about # of speeds - its the shifters which change the cable pull to move them around (so mixing shimano and sram can cause problems due to different amounts of cable pull). By RD not aligned with gears, do you mean the hanger / cage are bent? If so, go to your LBS ...


1

The Alfine has a chinaline of 42.7mm for a single crank and the Ultegra 43.5mm for the double and 45mm for the triple. For the double the chainline is measured halfway between the 2 rings so the outer ring will be even further out, but the inner further in. Sheldon says "With typical 5 mm chainring spacing, this puts the inner at 41 mm, the outer at 46 ...


1

You should be able to replace your chainring this with any 9 or 10 speed chainring that is 110 BCD (which is the Bolt Circle Diameter for the spider on an ultegra triple crankset). Tiagra/105/ultegra replacement rings should all fit, as well as most 3rd party manufacturers replacement rings. Make sure the ring you want to use as a replacement has ramps ...


1

If your hub is in good condition & you wish to keep it having the wheel rebuilt is the way to go. However if your shop is trying to charge you more then 100$ish dollars for a rebuild, especially on an older hub perhaps consider doing the rebuild yourself. Re/building wheels is not a particularly difficult task with a wheel stand & proper tools all of ...


1

There's a great thread here that describes some of this. Here's the meat of it though: Shimano's assertion that you need to use "flat-bar" front derailleurs with "flat-bar" shifters is false. When working with Shimano, "flat-bar" shifters are really just mountain-bike shifters in different colors. This doesn't make a difference for the rear ...



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