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10

To prevent galvanic corrosion. When grease is appied, there is a thin film of grease that prevent direct contact between two different metal. To prevent water and contaminants, especially salt in the winter season, that would otherwise accelerates corrosion as discussed in (1) This will not work with plastic or carbon fiber (+epoxy as matrix) materials as ...


8

It depends on your cadence (number of times you're turning the chainrings). If you fix the cadence, largest chainring (gear in the front) and smallest cog (gear in the back) will be fastest. In practice, you will not be able to keep up the same cadence on all gear combinations, so depending on the cadence you can keep, a smaller chainring in the front and ...


8

Yes. Barrel adjusters are reusable. More useful for the front mech which doesn't have any on-the-fly adjustment. And useful for the rear mech for quick adjustment without having to get out of the saddle.


7

That is normal behaviour. You pushed the piston way out, so oil from behind it found a way out. General actions suitable for your case as well: remove wheel remove pads carefully push the lever a couple of times in order for the pistons to extend a couple of mms. if one is stuck, make sure you push the other one with a plastic tyre lever while pulling the ...


6

From this article: Type B: by far the most popular one and also the default on Ultegra cranksets; it comes in 52 and 53 teeth and must be paired with 39 tooth inner chainring. Type A: comes in 53 as well as 54 and 55 teeth; as per Shimano’s advice must be installed together with a 42 small ring. Type E: a VERY rare combination: 56/44 There is NOTHING ...


5

Shimano has a pretty good track record of wear parts availability for older groupsets. I am using 8-speed myself, and there are several European mail order stores as well as local shops that have spare cassettes and chains. I would expect that 9-speed spare parts aren't going away either. The problem with off-road groups is that rear derailleurs are not ...


5

It really depends on your budget. Shimano 105 is quite a bit better than Claris. Claris uses an 8 speed cassette while 105 uses an 11 speed cassette. This means that 105 will have smaller gaps between the gears if both bikes have the same gear range. There are 2 levels between Claris and 105. They are Sora (9 speed cassette ) and Tiagra (10 speed ...


5

Here is the Shimano Exploded View PDF for the Di2 mech (pdf download): And for your XT one (pdf download): What you can see from those documents is that the Bracket Axle Unit aka B-Axle is very different between XT and XTR Di2. I would expect them not to be compatible.


5

You need a crank puller. It threads in to the crank arm, and presses on the bottom bracket spindle to pull the arms off. http://www.parktool.com/product/crank-puller-for-square-taper-cranks-ccp-22 A video here from Park Tool on using their crank puller: https://youtube.com/watch?v=E6ZcqNOcgm0


5

50/34 with and 11/32 on the rear is going to be very spinny. For me - the range is too wide and the gaps between the gears too big. But - this depends on the kind of riding you will be doing. If you are riding the very steepest of mountains - than the 34/32 combination might be what you are looking for. Purely for fast road work - that's too wide a ...


4

I don't think they will unfortunately. I'm sure the SRAM X0 crankset (below) is 80-120mm BCD on the 2x crankset. Do you know which model of X0 crankset it is that you have? The BCD may be stamped on the chainring, like the one pictured below. Shimano XT, with the exception of their latest M8000 series XT cranks, have a symmetric 64-104mm BCD. If you're ...


4

This is not easy to solve without actually having the bike to play with. It's also something I'd do fairly quickly so I'm trying to give a detailed explanation of something I've learned to do from experience rather than written instructions. I've built my own bikes, worked for a year as a mechanic, and ridden rather a lot on a variety of different bikes. I'm ...


4

It should be fully closed. The lever is only intended to be opened to allow the tire to pass during a wheel change or if you hit a pothole and knock your wheel badly out of true. If your pads are too close to the rim you make an adjustment with the barrel adjuster. Riding with the quick release open compromises the braking power of the caliper. You may not ...


4

Here is how I found the answer (30-45 N-m): Followed the link in the first comment on the question (or I could have done a search for something like "shimano alfine hub service pdf"). The link Gordon provided was led to several Shimano products identified only by part number, so I did another search for "shimano alfine 11 hub" and found a listing on Amazon ...


4

Unfortunately, You can't use 10 speed shimano road brifters with 10-speed dyna-sys mountain bike drivetrains. They just have different cable pull ratios. Your limited to a few options if you want to run drop bars with 10-speed shimano: Mount your existing MTB trigger shift on your drop bars. This means you have to take your hands off the hoods and drops to ...


4

You can use the chainring, but each brand (Shimano, SRAM, etc...) aligns the shifting ramps and pins to work best with their own brands inner rings. So the indexed shifting will not be as fast/smooth as when you would use the same brand of rings together. Inner rings frequently have individual teeth shaped so that the chain will lift off and drop down ...


4

"Old" bikes – those from before the '80s or so – usually have horizontal dropouts that allow maybe 2 or 3 cm of fore and aft movement. That should give you enough room to tension the chain. I would think that a 5-speed bike would date from this era and be built with horizontal dropouts. If that's the case then you can probably don't need a chain tensioner, ...


4

I have a Shimano Nexus 7 internally geared hub. When replacing my chain, I have a chaintool to remove the pins to shorten chains, which usually start out the length intended for a dérailleur. When the chain starts to wear, I move the wheel back a bit in the horizontal dropouts. See Sheldon Brown's entry for dropouts. I can't tell from your picture what ...


4

The 'fastest' combination of gearing will be the largest chainring in the front to the smallest cog in the rear. For a simplified example of why this is so consider a front chain ring with a diameter twice that of the corresponding rear cog. For every full rotation of the front ring the rear cog will experience two full rotations, and since the cog is ...


4

This is a partial answer: Given that the WH-RS10 isn't a fancy wheel, if you can't just get a 11 speed freehub body, you're going to be best off economically by just replacing the whole rear wheel if you want to go 11 speed. I suspect there isn't a replacement to 11 speed, but you can ask your bike shop or someone else may answer there is. Interestingly, ...


4

SL-RS35 is correct, there are newer versions however, there are many you can replace it with. Shimano uses a 2 to 1 pull ratio for shifters, Sram uses a 1 to 1 except for their entry level MX lines. In layman's terms you will be fine with just about any twist shifter made for 3x7 speed, Shimano Tourney or Revo twist, Sunrace, or Sram MRX Comp ...


4

Yes, that's fine. You won't damage the hub that way, although you might damage the cable attachments if they get caught in the chain, or lose some pieces. Single cable systems work by pulling and releasing the cable, and one gear is always "cable completely slack", just as it is when there's no cable there. Like what you did. It's just like a rear ...


4

You probably need to adjust the 'top stop' screw on the rear mech, and also tighten the rear gear cable. The rear mech has two small screws. One of these adjusts how far up/inward the mech will move and the other screw adjusts how far down/outward it will move. They are used to prevent the chain dropping off the top and bottom of the cassette. Work out ...


4

For road components Shimano has the following quality ranking, from top to bottom and from (very) expensive to cheap: Dura Ace Di2, Dura Ace mech., Ultegra Di2, Ultegra mech., 105, Tiagra, Sora and Claris. What trickles down from year to year are the innovations. If some innovation appears with the pro-groupset Dura Ace it will appear in the following or ...


3

As I said in a comment, there are 25+ years of 105 and Ultegra (well, ultegra was called something else back then, but the line has been around for quite a while), so you need to find the right 105/Ultegra you're talking about. You can find the Product Info at this link. In 11 speed: The Ultegra RD-6800-SS and 105 RD-5800 SS both have a 28t max. Thus, ...


3

It is possible -- you can either find a 36 spoke internal gear hub (since you have a 36 hole rim) and have the wheel re-built with the new hub and bodge on the cables for the IGH shifting. Alternatively, there are automatic shifting hubs (e.g. the SRAM Automatix) which will also have a coaster brake and no shift cables. That being said, its probably going to ...


3

If you want to go from Shimano 10 speed road to 11 speed road, you'll need a new cassette, new shifters, a new chain and a new rear derailleur, since the cable pull ratios have changed (again). Zinn also notes that 10 speed FD might not shift as nicely as 10 speed FD with the 11 speed shifters, so may as well throw one of those in. So, in the drive train, ...


3

I managed to fix this, but I'm not completely certain why it started working. I believe the fix was a combination of three things. Repulling the cable and being firm about pulling it horizontally through the lever. I don't believe I got it deep enough into the lever before putting the hood back into place for extra pressure on the cable helped it engage ...


3

4th gear and lining up the dots is only necessary when you are setting the cable length (during installation). You do not need to deal with that if all you did was remove the wheel. Shift so that you have enough cable to slide into the proper groove and hook the cable fixing bolt to the shifting pulley mechanism. I sometimes use one thumb to rotate the ...


3

No. And not only that, if you were to stay with square taper cranks you would find that the BB length for one crank does not necessarily match the BB length for another crank. In other words, if you use a 103mm square spindle bottom bracket A with crank B, it does not mean you would use a 103mm bottom bracket C with crank D, regardless of whether bottom ...



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