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12

There's a couple of things here. First there are the physical properties of the groupsets. As you move up the groupsets, what you're buying into is essentially smoothness and lightness. But for a recreational rider, you'd basically need the groupset to hit a certain minimum level of quality, and anything beyond that would be lost by the rider. And my ...


11

This is one of those questions that can start arguments between bike mechanics--to cross or not to cross the derailer cables. Crossing appears to be becoming more common on new bikes, if the cables aren't internal, but it's also going to depend upon the bike. Smoother shifting is reported by some from crossed cables. I would talk to the mechanic at your LBS ...


10

This is an odd question. The sentiment that the only security here is physical security is correct. Think about the following: The Shimano Di2 components are not mated/matched to a specific computer or instance of E-Tube software. So there's no 1:1 relationship. Therefore, any computer equipped with the SM-PCE1 or SM-BCR2 programming cables can be used to ...


8

As long as you existing rotors are in good condition and thicker than 1.6mm (minimum safe thickness) you should have no issue with using them with the Shimanos. There doesn't seem to be an industry standard specification for rotor thickness but it is generally taken to be between 1.8mm - 2.0mm. The new callipers will self adjust to the rotor width. Clean ...


7

First, make sure your bike is fit properly - with a bad fit, your efficiency is likely lousy. More sprockets is not necessarily going to make you go faster/easier - changing gear appropriately and becoming more physically fit will (along with better selected sprockets sizes - we went ages before the Gillette razor-blade increase in rear sprockets...). Most ...


7

The picture is a RD-M780-SGS long cage. Shimano have three codes for rear derailleur length: Short - SS Medium - GS Long - SGS I'm not aware of where this is printed on the RD though so not so helpful. However Shimano only have one non-clutched XT Dyna-Sys (10 speed) RD the RD-M780-SGS (long cage 43t capacity). The clutched (shadow+) RDs come in GS ...


7

I have seen this frequently and routed my cables this way. By routing the shifter cable from the right side of the handlebar around the stem to the cable boss on the left side of the frame (and visa versa) I create a more gentle bend in the in the cable housing. A gentler bend creates less internal friction on the cable. Another benefit is less stress on the ...


6

They still exist - they just aren't high enough in quality/product line to appear on the front page for Shimano (i.e. they aren't useful marketing points for Shimano, but you can still order parts in those groups from most cycling retailers - almost everyone who buys Tourney/Altus is an OEM or a bike shop who needs something very cheap for repairing BSO's; ...


6

I don't know anything about bottom brackets, but I found this document which says (on page 16): Shimano cartidge-bearing bottom-bracket spindles are marked with letter codes that correspond to different length spindles. These codes and the corresponding spindle lengths are: Code Length MM 107mm and 110.5mm LL 113mm D-H 115mm YL ...


5

I-spec is a Shimano-proprietary mounting system for Shimano parts. Its supposed to make mounting and adjusting brake+shift levers faster and easier by putting them on one mounting clamp. I couldn't find a blurb on what it does / how it operates on the Shimano website, but the equivalent for SRAM is SRAM Matchmaker, which from their website: "The ...


5

Perhaps instead of password protecting it, you might want to think of ways you could detect that the device was tampered with. I'm not certain how often you would change settings or plug into it, but you may want to cover the port with security tape or something similar so that you are aware when somebody has been messing with the equipment. This may not be ...


5

The first thing to do is check the brifter out to see if its actually broken - maybe its just a cable broken at the brifter or inadequate cable tension or something. You can get your bike shop to check this out. If it is broken, you can look for people who specialize in refurbishing brifters (they do exist, but they are hard to find). As for replacement ...


4

You should use Shimano mountain bike shifters (Acera, Alivio, Deore, etc.) which have the same # of chainrings and same # of cogs on the cassette. So if you're running a triple in the front and a 9 speed cassette in the back, you want a 3x9 shifter set. The road bike ones (Sora, Tiagra, 105, Claris, Ultegra, etc. - even flat bar ones, like the Sora flat ...


4

As long as you use a ten speed chain it shouldn't matter which group you take it from. Normally the higher priced ones are bit lighter but the additional price often does by far not match the lower weight. Also the higher priced ones might last not that long due to the lighter material. Therefore if it's for a bike where you know that it will see some dirt ...


4

The cable routing is different. Ultegra is designed to allow both cables to route along the handlebar (instead of that cable sticking out the side of the brake lever like on Sora), to give you a cleaner look and less chance of the cable getting in your way. Ultegra is higher quality than Sora. It should shift a bit better, or at least go more miles before ...


4

Usually racing front derailleurs like an arabesque will not allow the extra tolerance for a third ring. With that being said, the only way to know for sure is to try it. One thing to keep in mind is that the spindle length on your bottom bracket affects this as well. While your derailleur may have the extra tolerance to fudge it in some cases, if your ...


4

Generally the cleats come with some shims for exactly this problem. If you have the box with the original pedals look around for some thin cleat shaped shims. If you can't find them, you can hand make shims out of plastic milk bottles, or ask around at the dealer to see if they have any spares handy.


4

(Proviso - I assume your existing rotors are in good condition - if not the upgrade is a replacement of a worn component which needs doing anyway.) It will be fine to use existing rotors. Rotors come in all shapes and sizes and prices, so it can get confusing, but within the same size, the difference is more about balancing cost, weight and durability, the ...


4

It sounds like you need to adjust your rear derailleur - the cable may have slipped a bit and have insufficient cable tension, or if you recently had a crash, you may have bent your derailleur. I'd recommend reading this to learn how to adjust your derailleur.


4

According to BikeRadar, "The battery unit as well as the wiring for XTR Di2 are identical components to the ones used in Shimano's electronic road groups. The battery can be mounted on a bottle cage, in a seat tube, frame and can even be contained within the steerer unit of certain forks (via the use of PRO's new Tharsis components)."


4

I'm kind of confused here. You say you can only click 8 times. On a 9 speed bike, there would only be 8 clicks for shifting. Let's say you start on the largest gear, and we'll call that 1. Clicking 1 time with bring you to gear 2. Clicking 2 times will bring you to 3. Clicking 3 times with bring you to 4. Continuing on with the pattern will bring you on to ...


3

Simple answer would be that it's heavier, which is very important in road-bikes. Regarding the cable friction and smoother shifting, road shifters are going towards electronics


3

The item you removed (BB-06-PSPL - 113/68) is the bottom bracket. The 113/68 means that it s 113mm spindle length and 68mm bottom bracket length this means that it is a standard size and will be easily replaced. The PSPL means that it has a Powerspline interface with the cranks, this is a Truvativ/ SRAM proprietry system so if you wish to keep the cranks you ...


3

Also worth noting that you don't have to stick with Shimano parts - I use SRAM chains on my MTB and road bikes (9 and 10 speeds respectively). SRAM 9 speed chains come with a reusable powerlink connector that's much handier than the Shimano pin.


3

In the shortest way of answering this, yes, they will be suitable for trail/xc use. All flat pedals are relatively the same. They only differ in the amount of pins, contact area, weight and their thickness. You'll want something on the thin side for trail use, as you'll be pedaling quite a bit more than if you were on a downhill bike. This will help to ...


3

Leonard Zinn has discussed Shimano and Campy 11-speed drivetrain compatibility several times in response to reader questions. Technical FAQ: Drivetrain compatibility for 10- and 11-speed Technical FAQ: Follow-up on 10- and 11-speed compatibility Drivetrain compatibility hidden in plain sight Although Zinn doesn't specifically address chain compatibility, ...


3

If the 30 is worn to the point its slipping and jumping, I would my guess the others must be due for replacement, along with the chain. Individual cogs tend to only be available in high quality gear, so a new cluster will probably cost less than a single cog. Replace the cluster and chain if you can afford it. If not, the cheapest way would be to get a ...


3

Yes I test rode a Sora a few years ago with those thumb shifters - truly awful. My gut feel (I know Shimano well, but don't have direct experience of this groupset) is that one is a direct replacement for the other, but the only evidence I can find to back this is a review on Amazon. For sure there'll be no problems shifting, because you're staying at ...


3

According to Shimano's website, they are non-series components. However, some websites such as this one claim they are Ultegra quality (This wouldn't surprise me with Colin's answer). In any case, none of the Shimano long reach calipers are part of a series anymore. That being said, TRP (e.g. RG957) among others still make high quality long reach calipers ...


3

For that frame size, most likely 170mm, but you can measure from the centre of the pedal spindle to the centre of the BB: A popular online bike shop lists available crank lengths of 165, 170, 175, and 180. Presumably if you buy the bike "ready built" it will come with cranks chosen to match the frame size. But 165mm cranks are relatively rare outside of ...



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