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12

This is one of those questions that can start arguments between bike mechanics--to cross or not to cross the derailer cables. Crossing appears to be becoming more common on new bikes, if the cables aren't internal, but it's also going to depend upon the bike. Smoother shifting is reported by some from crossed cables. I would talk to the mechanic at your LBS ...


8

I have seen this frequently and routed my cables this way. By routing the shifter cable from the right side of the handlebar around the stem to the cable boss on the left side of the frame (and visa versa) I create a more gentle bend in the in the cable housing. A gentler bend creates less internal friction on the cable. Another benefit is less stress on the ...


7

That is normal behaviour. You pushed the piston way out, so oil from behind it found a way out. General actions suitable for your case as well: remove wheel remove pads carefully push the lever a couple of times in order for the pistons to extend a couple of mms. if one is stuck, make sure you push the other one with a plastic tyre lever while pulling the ...


7

To prevent galvanic corrosion. When grease is appied, there is a thin film of grease that prevent direct contact between two different metal. To prevent water and contaminants, especially salt in the winter season, that would otherwise accelerates corrosion as discussed in (1) This will not work with plastic or carbon fiber (+epoxy as matrix) materials as ...


6

Trek Fuel ex8 - has hydraulic disc brakes. Hydraulic disc brakes do not require adjusting - they are self-adjusting. In that, as the pad wears - the distance between pad and disc is adjusted automatically. The squeaking and squealing of disc brakes is a common complaint. My first advice would be to - bed the pads in - make sure the discs and pads are clean ...


6

If you know the model and exact year Bicycle Blue Book is a good place to start. This is a link to all the models for Peugeot: http://www.bicyclebluebook.com/BicycleDatabase.aspx?make=718


5

According to BikeRadar, "The battery unit as well as the wiring for XTR Di2 are identical components to the ones used in Shimano's electronic road groups. The battery can be mounted on a bottle cage, in a seat tube, frame and can even be contained within the steerer unit of certain forks (via the use of PRO's new Tharsis components)."


5

You can use either the Sora or 105 shifters (all the cable pulls will match). Sora 9 speed has the proper ergonomics (instead of the silly button that it used to use on 8 speed), so its a good shifter. As for if you will notice any performance difference, both should shift fine (if the 105's are indeed in good condition) [if you're racing, maybe you'll ...


4

Couple of points:- Firstly, yes they are compatible. Yes they do shift better of standard cables, this is due to cable drag. Cable drag is basically the friction between the inner and the outer. This friction causes slower and less accurate shifting. The polymer on the inner decreases the coefficient of drag between the inner and outer, this increasing ...


4

I'm kind of confused here. You say you can only click 8 times. On a 9 speed bike, there would only be 8 clicks for shifting. Let's say you start on the largest gear, and we'll call that 1. Clicking 1 time with bring you to gear 2. Clicking 2 times will bring you to 3. Clicking 3 times with bring you to 4. Continuing on with the pattern will bring you on to ...


4

Shimano/SRAM 11 speed cassettes are wider than 8/9/10 speed ones. So yes, you need a new, wider freehub body, unless your old one was not very old and used a spacer to fit a 10-speed cassette. People with non-Shimano brand hubs are less likely to find replacement freehub bodies, it seems, leading to replacement of the whole hub, or even the whole wheel if ...


4

That bike is much older than 10 years. Probably somewhere in the '80s The bike pictured below is quite similar to yours, and was built in 1985. [Source: Peugeot 1985 product folder] Note however that these frames are generally of good quality, and if not terribly rusty can be used for many more years (and of course are very cool and retro looking). ...


4

You could: measure the chain stretch sight if the chainrings and cogs are worn out check the wear of the tires remove the seatpost and peak inside the frame for rust pull the brakes and inspect closely the cables for rust check the wheels for trueness measure the weight of the bike with an electronic scale rock the handlebars gently to check for drag in ...


3

I can't see how a flat inside ring with no pick-up points machined into it wouldn't be compatible, providing the bolt patterns match up (which they do, I think). The bolt patterns are compatible. There are two reasons why the chainrings still may be counted as non-compatible: Not all Shimano chainsets have identical fitting of the chainring, ...


3

You can find what you're looking for under names like "downtube shifter lever boss kit".. You should be able to find something at a bike shop (especially one which works on older bikes) or a frame builder. Another alternative is to use a clamp.


3

You are right to say that the compact crankset will give you smaller gears to help you get over hills. You can do a straight swap of the crankset, everything else will be compatible, although will need readjustment. If you currently have a 5600 crankset, then you are absolutely safe to swap for another 5600 (compact) crankset. Now, the compatibility ...


3

In addition to the points noted in other answers, there is a significant technical difference: bearings. Traditionally, Dura-Ace equipment with bearings has had much better quality bearings/races/cups/seals/etc. That appears to be true here as well. Look at the parts breakdown documents from shimano and you'll see a significant difference in the ...


3

As you're not clear on road vs mtb, there's two answers. For 11 spd road drivetrains Shimano uses a 1.85mm wider hub with the drive side flange closer to the centerline to compensate for the additional width. Using a spacer allows the wheel to be backwards compatible to fit a 10 spd cassette. You can't fit a 11spd freehub in place of a 10spd freehub unless ...


3

The term for preparing the bottom bracket shell in this manner is called facing, and yes, it is necessary for all outboard bearing bottom brackets for proper function. To understand why this is, lets compare a hollowtech type system to a square taper cartridge. In the square taper, all the bearings and rotating portions are contained into a rigid metal ...


3

If your fork is a post mount, and your rotor is 160mm, you will not need additional adapters or spacers to fit a Shimano brake. The image from the manual you posted is correct.


3

Yes, and Yes. Brifters will work fine and the cassettes will work fine. You can use any 9 speed Shimano road components in the drivetrain (crankset+chainrings with appropriate bb, chain, cassette, derailleurs) and the rear derailleur can be a <10 speed mountain derailleur as well. The chain can be made by KMC/SRAM/Shimano/etc. and the cassette can be ...


3

If you want to go from Shimano 10 speed road to 11 speed road, you'll need a new cassette, new shifters, a new chain and a new rear derailleur, since the cable pull ratios have changed (again). Zinn also notes that 10 speed FD might not shift as nicely as 10 speed FD with the 11 speed shifters, so may as well throw one of those in. So, in the drive train, ...


3

I managed to fix this, but I'm not completely certain why it started working. I believe the fix was a combination of three things. Repulling the cable and being firm about pulling it horizontally through the lever. I don't believe I got it deep enough into the lever before putting the hood back into place for extra pressure on the cable helped it engage ...


3

As I said in a comment, there are 25+ years of 105 and Ultegra (well, ultegra was called something else back then, but the line has been around for quite a while), so you need to find the right 105/Ultegra you're talking about. You can find the Product Info at this link. In 11 speed: The Ultegra RD-6800-SS and 105 RD-5800 SS both have a 28t max. Thus, ...


3

Here is how I found the answer (30-45 N-m): Followed the link in the first comment on the question (or I could have done a search for something like "shimano alfine hub service pdf"). The link Gordon provided was led to several Shimano products identified only by part number, so I did another search for "shimano alfine 11 hub" and found a listing on Amazon ...


3

The pictures I've found of the FD-TY18 look like the pin across the rear of the cage is riveted in place. So, you probably can't remove it without a bit of work – through if the derailleur is damaged beyond repair it probably won't be too hard to either pry it apart (try holding with a screwdriver and twisting one side with pliers) or to cut it (and do ...


2

Parts need a break in time to stretch, flex, and do what they do before they kind of settle in. When I worked at a bikeshop, we told our customers to come in after a month or 2 so that we could go through and get everything tuned up to where it should be after the break in period. Not only is your situation normal, most bike shops WANT you to bring it back ...


2

Streuth, you are right! I just tried tightening my Shimano SR215s and now I can't get my shoes off! I thought you must have very thin feet, but I do not and this position is not all that tight. I have never tightened them up this much before simply because the ratchet straps are old and difficult to tighten. When I get some replacement straps, this is going ...


2

If it screws on then it is a freewheel not a cassette. They are not the same. There is a link in my comment. Your spacer kit with one sprocket was probably for cassette / freehub. It is not going to work. I suspect you can find a freewheel single speed conversion. You need a single speed freewheel - not a sprocket and a lockring.


2

To expand on Batman's answer, here is a good picture of an ispec-ready shifter attach to the brake lever's clamp. Here is a traditional shifter using its own clamp (SL-M591) taken from my potato camera



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