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12

Note: this calculation makes many assumptions, so it's only useful in an 'average use case', not some sort of exact measurement. If you find better information, please post it and I'll update the answer. How many pumps you would need to fill up a tire depends on many variables. First, the volume of your inner tube, which can be approximated as a torus ...


7

Schrader valves are stronger, for one. Breaking a weaker, smaller valve that has a (perhaps just in my experience) frustrating attachment mechanism for pumps on a $1,000+ fork would be unacceptable. Road Bicycles Schrader valves have at least one valid disadvantage on a road bicycle: their larger diameter is a deterrent for use because it reduces the ...


5

You're mixing up two different concepts. The damper, which is what slows things down. The spring, which is what holds the weight and absorbs shocks. The damper is usually hydraulic, oil being forced through a small hole. The spring is either a coil or pressurised air. Without a damper, you'll have a very bouncy ride and without a spring, you'll have a ...


5

A shock pump is designed to fill a very small volume of space with very high air pressures. A tire pump is designed to fill a large volume of air, to relatively low pressures, pretty quickly. You can technically fill a schrader valve tube using a shock pump, but because the volume of air for each repetition of the pump will be so low, it might take a week ...


4

Yes, very nearly all, if not all shock pumps certainly do use a schrader valve.


4

From my understanding, one of the major features for bicycle suspension is vertical travel. This is to increase pedal efficiency and rear wheel feel. This is why you see engineers jump through hoops when designing rear suspension for bicycles. For example, take a look at the Pivot Mach 429. If I count correctly, this bike has 5 points of rotation to ...


4

What's above the rear wheel for vertical shocks to mount to? It's pretty clear from the provided picture that the fulcrum for the rear wheel is near the bottom bracket. An upward force against the rear wheel will cause it to lift, reducing the distance between it and the mount point of the shock, allowing the shock to resist that movement.


3

Any shock with an eye to eye length of 20.0 cm (7.9 in) and 5.0cm (2.0in) stroke will fit as a direct replacement for your shock. All the shocks available as OEM options on the 2005 Prohphet used these dimensions. Any different eye to eye length will alter the geometry of your bike. Any different stroke length will either reduce travel, or if risk damaging ...


2

The fender or "mud guard" is so high because if it was much lower the tire would be banging into it whenever the shock compressed.


2

See my answer to this question for a similar answer: Does ProPedal on FOX RP2 rear shock wear out when on during downhill? Basically, you could cause damage to the shock by supplying pressure to either the oil or a part that wasn't meant to handle that much force. Now, do I think it'll break after 10 bunnyhops? Probably not, but it could cause much faster ...


2

The guy from the "maintenance" company is kinda right, kinda not. Talking to an expert (like PUSH) would be where to go to find out what changes work with your particular bike.


2

After a little Google research of this bike, you can see that the fork is assembled correctly. What's going on is that the crown (the part the stanchions attach to) is bent/twisted or the steer tube (the tube that runs through to the handlebars) is bent. Either way, you're going to need some mechanic work or a new fork. On a side note, you can probably ...


2

The usual way to do this is to use the sag as a guide. The geometry of your frame will affect the load on the shock and the pressure you need. To do this, put a zip-tie around the shaft of your shock*, or use the little rubber band if it has one and push it down against the seal. Next get dressed for riding and gently sit on your bike. When you get off ...


1

It looks like this bike has been run into the read of a stopped car. It may be cracked at the top of the form blades, at the crown. REPLACE!


1

The threshold setup of your shock should have a negligible if not non-existent bearing on its longevity. Run it how you like it. To give you an idea of what you're concerned about breaking, watch this video that describes how Brain shocks work. About 2/3rds of the way through you will get to see the internals of a Brain shock's inertia valve. They are not ...


1

It might not be possible to give you a 100% answer without opening the shock, but it certainly needs service. 6 months of use isn't a great determining factor for service intervals, hours of riding and type of riding (how big, how dirty) are much more important. Have you rebuilt your air can yet? Do you know how many hours you have on the shock? You can ...


1

I would not worry about it. I run my shocks with ProPedal on most of the time, and something else has always broken well before the rear shock gave out. You're not going to do any extra harm to the shock just because you ran it down a descent with ProPedal on. You should be more worried about bottoming the shock out or not keeping it properly serviced.


1

While shocks are certainly meant to be locked out and ridden, even over semi-rough terrain, there are probably some limits to the design. I'm not a fork/shock mechanic, but what I know about fluid dynamics tells me that you shouldn't do this too often! When you lock out your fork/shock it limits that compression of the fluids inside or prevents compression ...


1

First step: clear the confusion. As other answer states, the spring and the damper are complementary systems that work together in order to provide the desired ride characteristics. As for bike suspenssion regards, there are two main kinds of suspension components, based on the type of spring: Coil and Air. Most suspensions have hydraulic dampers regardless ...


1

The rear wheel is attached to stays that connect to a pivot point. As long as when the rear wheel moves upwards, the wheel and stays all rotate around the pivot to compress (or stretch, depending on shock type) the shock, then the rear suspension should work fine. Take a look at this bike, the shock is vertical. But, unlike the picture you showed, there are ...


1

You will also need to make sure the eye-to-eye length is same as your current shock (that's the distance from the centre of the pivot hole in one end to the pivot centre in the other), and that the stroke length is the same. If either of these is wrong, it will change your bikes geometry and possibly even cause the rear tyre to bottom out against the seat ...



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