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18

First up, I'd strongly recommend switching to clipless pedals. I had the same discomfort issues you're describing with normal shoes and toeclips and find clipless pedal so much more comfortable and secure (therefore safer). When comparing and evaluating clipless pedal systems, some of the more important attributes are: Float - This is the property where ...


14

I wear my MTB shoes with my road bike all the time. A number of the other guys in our group ride also do, nothing wrong with it at all. Road shoes are often stiffer than MTB shoes but not always. My SIDI's are just as stiff as the road version.


10

I wear a pair of Austin Pedal shoes by Keen to work at my government office every day. They're a fine shoe—they look decent and accept SPD's. They aren't anything special. There is no gore-tex liner (I think it'd be overkill for my commute most days). There is no reflective tab, though that would be nice. There is no carbon-reinforced toe-box—also ...


10

I've been using Shimano A530 pedals for that purpose. Mountain SPD-compatible clip on one side, with a nice wide flat platform on the other. I've also used the old Shimano M324 pedals, but prefer the slightly lighter weight and lower profile of the A530s. Note that other foot retention systems, such as PowerGrips and the like, will work with all shoes ...


10

First off, i question why anyone thinks the calf muscle is not suited for endurance. Its a very active component of running, biking, jumping and so on. The ball of your foot can take hours of running, biking and other activity with high pressure. The arch of your foot is soft, and where tendons stretch across. A cleat in your arch would cause massive pain ...


10

From a theoretical point of view, there are some possible methods to take water out of a fabric object, such as a shoe: "Replacing" the water for another, faster drying liquid and letting it evaporate; Squeezing the water out directly by compression and twisting (not usually adviseable); "Force field" like gravity and centrifugation; Capilary action (which ...


9

No! Treat yourself to some basic Shimano SPD shoes. Consider getting the pedals too. A popular entry model shoe is the M087 model, shown here with a basic SPD pedal: The Shimano shoes are reasonably wide, the sizes are as per your trainer size, available in EU size increments. The M087 has a ratchet mechanism for doing them up, you can adjust this whilst ...


9

I own a pair of these shoes, and while they are good for "barefoot" style running. I wouldn't want to bike with them except in an emergency. They are very flexible, with a thin sole that you can feel everything through. As such, I would say that they are definitely not fit for touring.


9

Sidi make a wide fitting version of their shoes. I have a pair of Sidi's and they have been the best fitting, most comfortable shoes I've ever found. From their website: Mega sizes are cut with more material throughout, and a larger-volume heelcup. Mega sizes roughly correspond to a EE/EEE width on the Brannock sizing scale. Possibly still not wide ...


9

I assume those shoes don't have cleats of any sort. Do you currently ride without toe clips? Adding toe clips might let you maintain a steadier foot position on the pedals. But many regular commuters go in for cleated shoes of some sort, very often the "mountain bike"/touring style with SPD cleats/pedals because they're "walkable". Whatever, you want a ...


9

My preference is for SPD clipless pedals and "walkable" clipless shoes. But I still have a pair of lightweight "tennis shoes" in my gear for campsite, days off, etc. Another option, if you can still find them, is the old-fashioned "touring" shoes and regular toe straps. "Touring" shoes are (or were) quite walkable, and it's reasonable to walk miles in ...


8

Flat pedal specific shoes usually have a special rubber compound, such as Five Ten's sticky rubber or Shimano (and others) Vibram sole (used in hiking shoes as well). The goal of these special rubber compounds is to better stick to the pins of the pedals and are therefore usually softer so as to get a good grip on them. My personal experience with skate ...


7

While I many many respects the anti-clipless guy around here, I do recognize that a lot or people love clipless shoes. While this question is not about clipless pedals or cleats, the stiff sole of a bike shoe is exactly what you want when cycling. However, they're not for everybody; I dislike the idea of having to bring extra shoes along on a tour. I ...


7

Toe overlap due to feet being further forward is only an issue at low speeds - you don't corner by turning the bars, you lean. It's not that the calf muscle is not suited to endurance, the issue is that it is contributing very little actual power during the pedal stroke (it's just stabilising) and yet it is using up energy that would be better saved for the ...


7

Seems that is the Look Memory Eyelet, where you can attach some kind of tab to help get replacement cleats in the same position. This Keo page seems to have a video on the subject, but I can't view it immediately ...


7

I just leave a pair of shoes at the office and change shoes when I get there so I don't have to take them back and forth. It's amazing how much space shoes take up in a backpack/pannier. I think that even the "walkable" shoes aren't that comfortable to be in all day. And any cycling shoes that you did want to walk around in all day would lose a lot of the ...


7

Unless you're using clipless pedals, you really don't need much in terms of special shoes for cycling. However, there are plenty of advantages to using clipless pedals, so many people choose to use them. The big categories of clipless shoes are: Road shoes tend to have the cleat exposed and you walk on it any time you step. This is really bad for ...


7

I used to ride with skate shoes for a year and it was not good. I didn't know it. Generally skate shoes: bend more than MTB shoes so they'll not transfer all of your energy on the pedals do not have sticky soles so riding on rough trails may be harder and more dangerous due to the feet constantly changing position on the pedals Regarding non racing ...


7

This is a mindfulness technique rather than a product, but when riding on flat pedals I consciously focus on keeping the balls of my feet over the pedal spindles. (I also resist the temptation, every time I see someone pushing flat pedals with their heels, to yell out "You're doing it wrong!")


7

It is a machine used for heating the shoes so that they can be formed to your feet. the shoes are heated. You then put them on your feet and they use a vacuum bag around the shoe to compress it against your foot so it gets the proper shape. Here's an article that explains it. I've had something similar done for hockey skates, although without the vacuum, and ...


6

I always use my MTB shoes on my road bike using SPD pedals: I don't have to buy extra shoes There are MTB shoes for cold and wet weather, road shoes are nearly always designed for summer. You don't have to be a member of the ministry of silly walks to walk on using MTB shoes


6

I go through 3 different types of shoes as the seasons change: Hot (80F+): sandals Variable (30-80F): indoor soccer shoes (eg adidas sambas) Cold (30F-): light hiking boots/trail running shoes For cold weather, you not only need to be comfortable while pedaling on your bike, but also confident off your bike. Lightweight hiking boots, with windproofing, ...


6

These guys make some nice shoes with SPD pedals (MTB style) : http://www.alwaysriding.co.uk/footwear-148/cycling-shoes-218/ An example :


6

Exustar road pedals are compatible with Look cleats, so you need to make sure any new shoes you consider are also compatible with Look cleats. Luckily, shoes w/ Look compatibility are very common, but you will want to check specifically when downselecting which ones you want to buy. Generally, when you buy new shoes, you should buy new cleats; old cleats ...


6

The "neutral" position places the ball of your foot over the pedal spindle, which I assume is where you're at. Conventional wisdom has it that sprinters and high-cadence riders will want the cleat positioned a little forward of that, LSD riders a little aft of that. But as with most positioning questions, the right answer is "whatever works for you."


6

You pedal with the ball of your foot and this should placed directly above the pedal axle. However, because you move your foot in a ~170mm radius circle altering the angle of your foot, 'directly above' moves back and fore through the pedal stroke. Getting the ball of the foot behind the axle is not desirable as you are then using the toes rather than the ...


6

For what I know from personal experience, experience from friends, and from discussion on forums and sites like this one, the shoes are one of the many things about bike equipment about what the answer to the question is "whatever suits you best". It is very common for riders to use a lot of very different shoes: sandals for grocery, regular shoes for ...


6

A cobbler (i.e. a shoe repairman) can glue a new layer of sole (e.g a non-slip rubber sole that's suitable for winter) onto a pair of shoes' existing soles: so perhaps ask a cobbler.


6

If odor is your main concern, I can highly recommend the so-called boot bananas. You put them in your shoes whenever you are not using them, and it slowly kills all odors. I have a pair of boot-bananas for a year now, and I am very enthousiastic about it, all odors are gone since I use them. It did not use them for my cycling shoes though (they don't smell ...


5

I've never had a pair of MTB shoes that are waterproof though I wouldn't doubt if they exist. Even if they were you'd still have water coming of your shin and into the shoe (this is what makes even waterproof shoe covers a bit wet inside). I just tough it out. I have a set of neoprene shoe covers that keep my feet warm and maybe even dry depending on how ...



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